Teak Decking Systems - any experience with use for replacement of a wh

Soho

Member
419
7
Bermuda..
Does anybody have any direct experience with replacing a teak deck with Teak Decking Systems product ? Looking for input on quality, ease of overall process, cost etc Reference case would be a 42 foot CR type boat and would be a complete replacement

 

Soho

Member
419
7
Bermuda..
Thanks, interesting effort. I think my decks are past being able to recaulk, which might be a good thing trolling through your postings on your project. Did you track total hours by any chance ?

 

crashdog

Anarchist
542
182
I haven't used the product you have mentioned. But I did a teak deck using the Gougeon Brother's approach. We laid 4mm teak veneers straight fore/aft. We epoxied them to the original plywood deck and filled the joints with carbon and epoxy. It was a pretty quick job, about the same as laying click/lock flooring in your basement. It was on a mostly flush decked boat 43'. The hardest part of the job was r'n'r on the deck gear. It was about 25% of the cost of a full on teak rebuild.

Another detail - the boat had that horrid alu toerail, You know, the old slotted black one. We chose the thickness of the veneer to match the 1/8" inboard profile, This allowed for a relatively clean finish that essentially butted against the toerail.

 

eliboat

Super Anarchist
2,225
611
FWIW, most builders that I have dealt with, actually all but a couple use TDS for their own decks. It's not that any of these builders aren't capable of designing and installing a complete teak deck, it's just TDS makes it so much easier, especially with a tight build schedule. I think that that is endorsement enough. Remember, what they give you is pretty dependent on the information you provide them (accurate drawings) of your deck and hardware.

 

Soho

Member
419
7
Bermuda..
Thanks for the input, I had heard that many builders, including Hinckley and Morris, were doing this, going to have to at least speak to them and get a quote to ballpark it.

 

Not My Real Name

Not Actually Me
43,037
2,823
Thanks, interesting effort. I think my decks are past being able to recaulk, which might be a good thing trolling through your postings on your project. Did you track total hours by any chance ?
No. I think knowing how much time was into that may have made me suicidal somewhere around the halfway point.

 

Soho

Member
419
7
Bermuda..
Sea-Lution - thanks for the offer, I think I have enough information to go with TDS at some point in the next 18 months when I can get the old decks ripped up and prepped myself and get them to come and measure them etc. Based on research to date it seems the obvious way to go these days if you decide you must have teak decks. Of course any input you have is welcome.

 

Sea-lution

New member
47
0
95W 29.5N
The current issue of Professional Boatbuilder has an extensive article about TDS, I am very impressed and think you made a good choice. Funny, I bought a lot of teak from them when I lived in FL during the time I removed the teak decks on my boat. As far as removing your deck, I can answer questions, and (unless your boat has a liner) have or can figure out a solution for any problem. What is the make of your vessel?

 

Soho

Member
419
7
Bermuda..
Thanks, I have that article from PB as well, influenced my commitment to go TDS route. As mentioned, I am a little ways away from the project. I will PM you on it, interested to learn what you might have learned. It is an Albin Nimbus 42.

 

Sea-lution

New member
47
0
95W 29.5N
Ah, bluewater performance cruiser (thank goodness she is not a Swan). Sadly, teak is The Best nonskid ... and that's all the support you'll get from me about teak decks. Our boats have a lot in common so (assuming you like your boat, do your own work, and go offshore) some or more of my experience and knowledge will be helpful.

You asked about time, I didn't specifically keep track of time and my goal was Get Rid Of The Teak Deck, but I did count the screws: 1806 (bolts into the hundreds?) my boat only had teak on the side decks.

Intended use is everything; poke around your deck and its fittings before delving into the TDS, and consider your long-term plans: keep the boat forever? are you putting on new teak decks in hope of retaining classic resale value? will the boat spend any significant time in the tropics? ...

Another detail - the boat had that horrid alu toerail, You know, the old slotted black one.
+10 on what crashdog says. My toerail looked fine ... until I pulled a bolt and discovered the bolt holes were severely corroded. Yours probably are too, being in Bermuda it might be difficult to (affordably) source new Al toe rails, which initially was my plan, but I couldn't find any toerail that matched the bolt hole pattern of the old ones ... then I pulled the decks off and discovered that mounting a new Al toerail would require more work than making my own. Can't use a snatch block on my teak toerails, but since I singlehand I don't feel safe using the asym so I'm selling it. Haven't had a chance to try my new drifter offshore yet, but if I find it requires snatch blocks I'll mount conveniently-located U-bolts for them.

A nearby sistership recently had her teak decks removed and asked the yard leave the toe-rail - they cut the teak under the toerail at 45 degrees to the fiberglass deck and painted it along with the deck. Looks surprisingly nice, but now water can't drain off the deck. :p She's not going out to sea so it doesn't matter that her toerail and its bolts are no longer serviceable. I visit her occasionally to see if the paint is peeling off that teak yet. :D

Thanks, interesting effort. I think my decks are past being able to recaulk, which might be a good thing trolling through your postings on your project. Did you track total hours by any chance ?
No. I think knowing how much time was into that may have made me suicidal somewhere around the halfway point.
Suicide By Teak Deck - hahaha! My neighbors are currently chiseling off their teak decks - they put the teak on themselves with (drumroll) 5200. I just love other people's problems. :D I didn't specifically keep track of time but estimated it few years ago - about 2500 hours. Which is a meaningless number for you/most people since I can't resist doing outstanding work and did not replace the teak; those hours include research, prepping the deck for paint, making my own (teak) toerails, stanchion bases, rebuilding the windlass locker doors, etc.

My boat was the epitome of Leaky Teaky, there were quite a few years I wanted to name him Louis Leaky (of course I would have named the dinghy Lucy :) ) (humor for the archaeologically informed). If I could I would have recored the decks so add that to the hours, but each block of the balsa is encapsulated with resin so there is no (easy, cost palatable way of) removing the fiberglass decking. Years ago I removed the headliner and drilled holes to drain the water, but being that the balsa is saturated with saltwater it will never dry. Not great, but I'm not circumnavigating so it doesn't matter. If you get PB you are also a Marine Industry Professional - do you have (access to) a moisture meter? Have you checked your decks from the underside?

Thanks for the heads-up about a PM, I had some time to waste while waiting for boat parts to arrive, which will be tomorrow. My life does not revolve around the i-net so I'll try to remember to regularly check my e-mail account linked to this forum for your PM.

 

Moonduster

Super Anarchist
4,823
230
2500 hours - did you grow the teak from seeds? That's 50 hours a week for a year. I'm guessing your deck is glued with bullshit, no?

 

Passport111

Member
269
12
Check out Boatworks Today on You Tube. He has done some work with TDS and has a review from a year ago or so. Also, he just started the teak deck replacement on a 40 footer using TDS and will be posting videos on it throughout the winter.

 

Baldur

Super Anarchist
I know it is not what your asking, but I had to throw it out there.

After redoing a horrible deck on a classic wood motor yacht (86ft) that was literally a process of years. More recently helping with the Mid80's Beneteau my friend owns, I will never go thru that again. (admitting I am no expert, yet not 100% ignorant)

I have read several articles on synthetic teak in practical sailor, good old boat etc. and looked personally at at least 4 owner projects. I'm sold. If ever in that position I will go with one of these products.

Time, effort, $$$'s, results - its all there for me. Advantages in the categories of weight, longevity and maintenance.

http://www.nuteak.com/

http://www.flexiteek.com/

http://www.teakforboats.com

http://www.ameriteakmarine.com/IMAGE-GALLERY

http://www.nuteak.com/synthetic-marine-teak-decking

 

BlackBart

New member
[SIZE=10.5pt]I did some research on caulking, on a very amateur level before I replaced my own caulking. TDS seems to be one of the best products. Unless you can work indoor I recommend you to check their requirements regarding humidity and moisture. [/SIZE]

[SIZE=10.5pt]I was planning to use TDS but ended up using another product because I had to work outdoors (tarp tent) and would not be able to get the air humidity down to get the surrounding wood to have less than 12% moisture content that is required for TDS SIS 440. [/SIZE]

[SIZE=10.5pt]There are some nice videos on youtube of this guy using TDS, 8 parts in total[/SIZE]


 

Paul Koch

Member
254
383
HCMC Vietnam
Flexiteek 2G is the worst product that I has used in 40 years of building boats , and their back up service is nothing short of pathetic . It is impossible to keep clean and gets moldy at the first hint of moisture . The whole supply chain from head office in Sweden , distributor in the UK , to the supplier in Asia refuse to take responsibility for any of the issues we had with their product .

 




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