Texas Abortion ban comes into effect.

ShortForBob

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https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-09-01/texas-law-banning-abortion-after-six-weeks-comes-into-effect/100426890

Abortion ban after 6 weeks

Ability to sue providers

And they're going after the morning after pill too just to make sure we women stop giving you blokes sex. <_<

Signed by Republican Governor Greg Abbott in May and becoming law from September 1, it prohibits abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected — usually around six weeks — and before most women even know they are pregnant.

Thanks Trump.


 

 
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ShortForBob

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Not on this deal. Bet Trump is all for abortions. This is Baptists and Catholics.
SCOTUS.

A Texas law banning most abortions in the state has taken effect, but the US Supreme Court has yet to act on an emergency appeal to put the law on hold.


 



If allowed to remain in force, the law would signal the most dramatic restriction on abortion rights in the United States since the high court's landmark Roe v Wade decision legalised abortion across the country in 1973. 

 

ShortForBob

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It's a sneaky approach to get around Roe V Wade

But among those restrictions, the Texas bill stands out for the novel approach it takes in curtailing the procedure.


 


Rather than imposing a criminal or regulatory punishment for those who conduct abortions after the point in the pregnancy, the state law created a so-called "private right of action" to enforce the restriction. Essentially, the legislature deputized private citizens to bring civil litigation -- with the threat of $10,000 or more in damages -- against providers or even anyone who helped a woman access an abortion after six weeks.

"The way the bill is structured incentivizes vigilante lawsuits that will harass abortion providers and those who support providing abortions in Texas," Adriana Piñon, an attorney at the Texas chapter of ACLU, told CNN.
The approach was aimed at insulating the law from the sort of federal legal challenges that would prevent it from going into effect. One such lawsuit -- brought by several clinics represented by the ACLU and other groups -- is now mired in a complicated procedural dispute that has prompted the clinics to ask for a Supreme Court intervention, which didn't come as of 1:30 a.m. ET Wednesday.
The upshot is that while the legal fight plays out, providers in Texas may have to decide whether they want to risk costly litigation brought by private plaintiffs who seek damages under the state law.
Anti-abortion activists are already preparing to bring lawsuits if clinics violate the six-week ban.
"This whole mechanism only works if there is a credible threat of lawsuits being brought against an industry if they decide to ignore the law," said John Seago, the legislative director for Texas Right to Life, which advocated prominently for the abortion ban. "So, we have been working to make sure that all those pieces are in place, that if we do have reports, that we do see evidence that they're violating the law, then we can actually enforce the law ourselves."
(After Seago spoke to CNN, a state court on Tuesday issued temporary orders blocking Seago and his organization from bringing a private enforcement action against two attorneys and an organization that assists women in accessing the procedure.)
Seago told CNN that the push for the law was motivated in party by a letter rolled out in October by a coalition of state and local prosecutors from across the country who vowed to not enforce anti-abortion laws, even if Roe was overturned.
Though previous proposals from the anti-abortion movement included civil liabilities, the Texas ban is unique in that it is structured entirely around that threat. How it expands who can sue under the measure -- "any person," besides a government official, according to the text -- is novel in the context of abortion as well, he said.
"One of the great benefits, and one of the things that's most exciting for the pro-life movement, is that they have a role in enforcing this law," Seago said.
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/08/31/politics/texas-six-week-abortion-ban-supreme-court-explainer/index.html







 






 

saxdog

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Not on this deal. Bet Trump is all for abortions. This is Baptists and Catholics.
Trump and the GOP are for anything that foments division and titilates the culture warriors . Moral compunction has nothing to do with it.

 

benwynn

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A rough example that I heard:  If you are an Uber driver in Texas, giving someone a ride to a clinic for abortion services, you can be sued by someone in Kansas.  And if the suit is successful, the guy in Kansas gets paid $10,000 by the State of Texas.

 

Ease the sheet.

ignoring stupid people is easy
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A rough example that I heard:  If you are an Uber driver in Texas, giving someone a ride to a clinic for abortion services, you can be sued by someone in Kansas.  And if the suit is successful, the guy in Kansas gets paid $10,000 by the State of Texas.
Interesting way to redistribute money.......

 

benwynn

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Interesting way to redistribute money.......
It's a really creative end run.  It turns private citizens into enforcers and bounty hunters.  It's flat out weird.  And apparently there are provisions that allow frivolous suits. So, basically people can just randomly sue a clinic and effectively put an owner out of business just with the legal costs.

This is shit I heard in an interview NPR over the weekend while working on the boat, so no cites.

Look forward to our resident consul's legal take on this stuff. 

 

Sol Rosenberg

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2F126E75-6CE1-43C8-8EA0-F356D37C710E.jpeg

 

Mike G

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the funniest part of this attack on women's rights is the fact that these Texan cunts are screaming, 'my body, my choice' at anti vax anti mask rallies.
Yeah, "don't make my kid wear a mask while they do active shooter drills, because it's traumatic for them. Plus, the bulletproof backpacks are too heavy to carry while wearing a mask."

"my body my choice" turns into "your body, uber drivers choice"

 

benwynn

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Venom said:
Apples and oranges, dipshit. 
In a way, yes.

OK: Forcing a woman who has been raped to carry her attacker's child to term.

NOT OK: Having to put a piece of cloth on your face.

 
A

Amati

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A rough example that I heard:  If you are an Uber driver in Texas, giving someone a ride to a clinic for abortion services, you can be sued by someone in Kansas.  And if the suit is successful, the guy in Kansas gets paid $10,000 by the State of Texas.
Can non Texans be sued by Texans?

Can any facility releasing industrial effluent teratogens be sued?  Freight companies hauling teratogenic chemicals? People who won’t move away from facilities releasing teratogens?  People who move to he same  areas? Politicians who pass/ don’t pass laws and regulations that result in any abortions- laws
that that restrict access of poor pregnant women to adequate health care, proper nutrition, and rest? Companies that won’t provide such help?  Traffic accidents resulting in spontaneous abortions?  Spousal abuse?  I can see this might be a new source of revenue nationwide for plaintiff lawyers, (and environmental groups).  I can see the ads now…. :lol:   Will the Texan court system be glutted with cases? A golden era of radical environmentalism, social welfare, and personal safety in Texas!

 
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