That's a trailer sailer!

bmiller

Super Anarchist
6,122
1,426
Buena Vista, Colorado
Many people think I'm nuts for wanting another largish boat on a trailer. But in my seemingly never ending search I've run across some remarkably large boats sitting on road trailers.

For example, a 37.5 hunter in North dakota. https://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/80204

31C49372-812B-4F7C-AB35-51A4A8F12549.jpg


A little more reasonable but still big, 30' S2. 

7245301_20191023065816271_1_LARGE.jpg


And of course my old boat, 27' ComPac.

zsdf%20(13)-L.jpg


 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,999
3,285
Edgewater, MD
An S2 would be a good choice.  I know I'll get flamed for this, but have you considered a C&C Mega 30? It's specifically built for trailering.

 

bmiller

Super Anarchist
6,122
1,426
Buena Vista, Colorado

2airishuman

The Loyal Opposition
1,012
487
Minneapolis area
In most jurisdictions, it is easy and cheap to get oversize permits for moving your own boat up to a 12'6" beam.  In Minnesota you can get a permit for up to 14' beam and 14' vertical clearance for a nominal annual fee. 

The two main limitations that limit the size of trailerable boats are, as I see it:

- Most people aren't comfortable driving a truck with a trailer that large, let alone backing it

- Tow vehicle weight handling capacity

- Trailer purchase price

The 37.5' Hunter in the photo is 20,000 including trailer which is beyond what anything can tow other than a dual rear wheel diesel pickup specifically set up at the factory for high-capacity towing.

Most 3/4 ton pickups can only tow 10,000-12,000 pounds.

I tow my Hunter 26; it's at the upper end of what can be unstepped/landed and launched/stepped without a crane and travellift.

I haven't been able to figure out a use case for towing a 37' boat that isn't cheaper when I pay someone else by the mile to do the hauling.

I recently saw a Pacific Seacraft Orion for sale (30') that came with a trailer.  Good, seaworthy boat for that size range.

 
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bmiller

Super Anarchist
6,122
1,426
Buena Vista, Colorado
In most jurisdictions, it is easy and cheap to get oversize permits for moving your own boat up to a 12'6" beam.  In Minnesota you can get a permit for up to 14' beam and 14' vertical clearance for a nominal annual fee. 

The two main limitations that limit the size of trailerable boats are, as I see it:

- Most people aren't comfortable driving a truck with a trailer that large, let alone backing it

- Tow vehicle weight handling capacity

- Trailer purchase price

The 37.5' Hunter in the photo is 20,000 including trailer which is beyond what anything can tow other than a dual rear wheel diesel pickup specifically set up at the factory for high-capacity towing.

Most 3/4 ton pickups can only tow 10,000-12,000 pounds.

I tow my Hunter 26; it's at the upper end of what can be unstepped/landed and launched/stepped without a crane and travellift.

I haven't been able to figure out a use case for towing a 37' boat that isn't cheaper when I pay someone else by the mile to do the hauling.

I recently saw a Pacific Seacraft Orion for sale (30') that came with a trailer.  Good, seaworthy boat for that size range.
As you can tell in the last photo above I'm very comfortable hauling, backing, maintaining and storing a relatively large boat.

Where did you see the Orion?

 

TwoLegged

Super Anarchist
5,893
2,259
I tow my Hunter 26; it's at the upper end of what can be unstepped/landed and launched/stepped without a crane and travellift.

I haven't been able to figure out a use case for towing a 37' boat that isn't cheaper when I pay someone else by the mile to do the hauling.
If all you want to do is bring the boat home for the winter, so that you can work on it whenever you have  a spare 5 minutes (because travel time to the boat is zero), then a trailer makes a lot of sense.  Borrowing or renting a tow vehicle twice a year will be much cheaper than than the cost of yard storage, so if you are buying the trailer at used prices it will pay for itself quickly.

OTOH, if you want to use the boat like a massive trailer-sailer, towing her off cross-country for a weekend splash, then you will need your own monster tow vehicle.

I once saw a Dragon which was used a bit like that.  It was an immaculate varnished Borreson job which went around the regatta circuit, with no expense spared. Instead of a trailer, it had its own mid-sized flatbed truck (also immaculate), with huge built-in storage boxes for all the gear and the squillions of new sails.  Very clearly a please-notice-that-this-is-a-money-no-object exercise.

 
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toddster

Super Anarchist
4,465
1,147
The Gorge
There is a fellow on the Ericson forums who has (one of) his E29(s) tricked out as a trailer-sailor.  Apparently there are a couple of lakes he frequents with veeery long ramps, and he's got a tabernacle + gin-pole rig to step the mast.

 I tow mine every few years for haul-out work and it comes in just a feather or two under the 25,000 lb GCVW that it's legal to haul without a class A CDL.  ...if all the gear is stripped out of it, the tanks are empty, and the dog takes a leak first.  Actually, I think the GCVW isn't the issue, it's that a bit too much of it ends up on the trailer.  

 

SeattleEngineer

New member
30
11
This J/110 is still for sale, on a lovely Triad gooseneck. 

I have a trailer for my Ranger 29, and would love to check out the Great Lakes, New England, or the Bahamas.  I just haven't had the time to leave the PNW, yet. 

 
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bmiller

Super Anarchist
6,122
1,426
Buena Vista, Colorado
This J/110 is still for sale, on a lovely Triad gooseneck. 

I have a trailer for my Ranger 29, and would love to check out the Great Lakes, New England, or the Bahamas.  I just haven't had the time to leave the PNW, yet. 
That's pretty cool. The shipping cost to get the trailer back from PR might make it a wee bit expensive.

 
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Panope

Super Anarchist
1,645
804
Port Townsend, WA
If all you want to do is bring the boat home for the winter, so that you can work on it whenever you have  a spare 5 minutes (because travel time to the boat is zero), then a trailer makes a lot of sense.  Borrowing or renting a tow vehicle twice a year will be much cheaper than than the cost of yard storage, so if you are buying the trailer at used prices it will pay for itself quickly.
That's how I play it.  Home made trailer.  Shed is a bonus.

For years I did the "Borrow or Rent" thing for the tow vehicle.  Eventually, that got old, so last year I bought a nearly free "cab and chassis" (pick-up truck with no bed) at an auction.

This season, the plan is to provision the boat while still in the shed.  We will depart for our trip directly from the travel-lift slings.

VE3viDT.jpg


 

TwoLegged

Super Anarchist
5,893
2,259
This season, the plan is to provision the boat while still in the shed.  We will depart for our trip directly from the travel-lift slings.
I love that idea.

Its how I thought I would use my campervan.  Since it was parked beside the house, I could pack and provision at my leisure, and then set off with everything sorted.  In practice, there has always been something to fix or reorganise in the runup to a trip, so I end up having to unload all my careful packing, then throw everything in any old way at the last minute, and sort it out in some remote field.  Somehow a boat in the harbour is easier for me to organise more sanely.

Hope your plan works out. Maybe you are having a better-organised incarnation.

BTW, the have your own truck wouldn't work over here.  Since you're not using it for trade purposes, it gets taxed as a private car.  And since it falls into the top bracket for rad tax (over 225g CO2),  the road tax is €2,350/year.  And the insurance will be another grand.  So you'l have standing costs of about €4k/yr before you even move the truck.

 
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AnotherSailor

Super Anarchist
1,276
403
SF Bay
7 hours ago, Marcjsmith said:


Oh man! Have I been doing it all wrong?

Hilarious how there is actually a second person on the boat who pops up after the "launch."

I guess if you do not care about your boat or trailer, it is fine.

 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,465
1,147
The Gorge
I love that idea.

Its how I thought I would use my campervan.  Since it was parked beside the house, I could pack and provision at my leisure, and then set off with everything sorted.  In practice, there has always been something to fix or reorganise in the runup to a trip, so I end up having to unload all my careful packing, then throw everything in any old way at the last minute, and sort it out in some remote field.  Somehow a boat in the harbour is easier for me to organise more sanely.

Hope your plan works out. Maybe you are having a better-organised incarnation.

BTW, the have your own truck wouldn't work over here.  Since you're not using it for trade purposes, it gets taxed as a private car.  And since it falls into the top bracket for rad tax (over 225g CO2),  the road tax is €2,350/year.  And the insurance will be another grand.  So you'l have standing costs of about €4k/yr before you even move the truck.
We have some farm vehicles that only get used seasonally (plus to tow the boat.) Cool thing is that as farm equipment, we can choose to only license and insure them during the quarter(s) that they actually get used.  However, the state does conduct inquiries from time to time, to be sure that we're actually farming with them.  

One down side is that after the truck sits behind the barn for six months, it takes a day to evict all the mouse nests, and repair whatever they've chewed through.  :angry:

 
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