The 2021 Aviation thread

Liquid

NFLTG
4,624
807
Over there
I left a sales career 6ish years ago and transitioned to trying to build stuff. Initially, I spent a few years in Annapolis, MD learning residential renovation with a friend.

Whilst there, I did a few renos for some ex Navy pilots (old guys like me). They all had a similar vibe.... extremely humble, even the A6 Intruder (or A4?) pilot that back in the day 'wing manned(?)' fighters in the landing pattern, to the deck, at night, in bad weather, who then lands on the same deck, in the same conditions, last... No more fuel for you!

I thought and expressed badass level of human to the owner: Him - "meh, I was young and just doing the job I was trained and loved to do"... 

My youtube algo found me this channel recently... Now I know what RIO stands for!:
 




 
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chum said:
Speaking of VW’s...
Here is a VW powered aircraft.  2180CC, 80 HP.

outside 1.jpg

 
I've only seen 2180's in hot rodded Beetles and they were hand grenades with a lifespan of hours.

How have they made them durable enough to power an aircraft?
It's not really hot rodded.  Mild cam, and with a direct drive prop the 80 HP rating is at 3400 RPM.  Redline is 4000 but you will never see it. Continuous rating is 60 HP.

 

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,915
3,470
chum said:
That reminds me of a funny story in Flying Magazine years ago.

Two Air Force pilots were over the Med somewhere in a 172 on a leisure flight. For some reason, they had a monkey on board in a cage. Somehow it got out and started doing laps around the cockpit windows. It was chaotic for a minute or two. At some point it hit the latch on the door window and out it went, problem solved. 
I'll raise you this story...


ARTICLE






 


Cow falls from sky, sinks boat




 


 




 


In 1997, the crew of a Japanese fishing boat was pulled from the Sea of Japan after clinging to the boat's wreckage for several hours.  They were immediately arrested, however, after authorities interrogated them about the boat's fate.  To a man, they claimed a cow had fallen from the sky, apparently coming from nowhere, and struck the boat amidships, resulting in a huge hole and its rapid sinking.

The crew remained in prison for several weeks until Japanese authorities were contacted by several highly embarrassed Russian air force officials.  It turned out that the crew of a Russian cargo plane had stolen a cow that wandered near their Siberian airfield and forced it onto their plane before they took off for a flight home.  Once airborne, the cow apparently panicked and starting rampaging through the cargo hold, causing the crew also to panic because it was affecting the plane's stability.  They solved the problem by shoving the cow out of the hold while crossing the Sea of Japan at 30,000 feet.

Unfortunately, following Rules 5 (Look-out), and 7 (Risk of collision) won't keep you out of trouble when the danger is airborne! 

Source: Australian Financial Review, 16 May 2000




 
chum said:
Someone should fry:
If there was no wire and they knew that ahead of time, then I think it was cool.  Otherwise pretty sketchy - either having the wire there or not having done recon ahead of time.

There is no military flyover rule in 14 CFR part 91.  Altitude rules for helicopters are looser than fixed wings and it doesn't apply to military at all.

 

herbie verstinx

Anarchist
517
267
so. cal.
If there was no wire and they knew that ahead of time, then I think it was cool.  Otherwise pretty sketchy - either having the wire there or not having done recon ahead of time.

There is no military flyover rule in 14 CFR part 91.  Altitude rules for helicopters are looser than fixed wings and it doesn't apply to military at all.
Camera wires most likely.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
68,786
12,411
Great Wet North
I'll raise you this story...


ARTICLE






 


Cow falls from sky, sinks boat




 


 




 


In 1997, the crew of a Japanese fishing boat was pulled from the Sea of Japan after clinging to the boat's wreckage for several hours.  They were immediately arrested, however, after authorities interrogated them about the boat's fate.  To a man, they claimed a cow had fallen from the sky, apparently coming from nowhere, and struck the boat amidships, resulting in a huge hole and its rapid sinking.

The crew remained in prison for several weeks until Japanese authorities were contacted by several highly embarrassed Russian air force officials.  It turned out that the crew of a Russian cargo plane had stolen a cow that wandered near their Siberian airfield and forced it onto their plane before they took off for a flight home.  Once airborne, the cow apparently panicked and starting rampaging through the cargo hold, causing the crew also to panic because it was affecting the plane's stability.  They solved the problem by shoving the cow out of the hold while crossing the Sea of Japan at 30,000 feet.

Unfortunately, following Rules 5 (Look-out), and 7 (Risk of collision) won't keep you out of trouble when the danger is airborne! 

Source: Australian Financial Review, 16 May 2000
One of the funniest episodes of Hill Street Blues had something similar - a ghetto rustler had a cow on the top floor of a tenement where he planned to butcher it.

They couldn't get the cow to go down again - "They ain't got no down genes" (apparently that's true - they will go up but not down stairs).

Renko figured to get the cow up on the roof and pick it up in a sling under the police chopper.

All worked fine until the sling broke and dropped the beast of the hood of a passing car. :lol:

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
68,786
12,411
Great Wet North
I hadn't seen it since it was current but earlier this year I got to binge it on Roku - it was as good as I remembered but curiously, Joyce Davenport was not as otherworldly beautiful as I remembered.

 

Ventucky Red

Super Anarchist
11,430
1,220
chum said:
I know the FAA has no jurisdiction inside MOAs, but what about elsewhere?
Okay... the way I got this a while back while attending an FAA Wings Seminar - it was about operating in or near an MOA, which we have a lot of around here.

Military pilots do not have FAA licenses nor are the aircraft subject to airworthiness or maintenance standards, therefore they are not governed by the FAA.  However, the military regs and standards in many cases may be far more stringent than the FAA. Also, the pilots will follow FAA regs when flying in the national airspace but they are not tied to them. 

The speaker summed it up with " can they blast around at treetop level over your neighborhood and not catch any flak from the FAA, yes, but, the FAA can register a complaint, they have a commanding officer to answer to, and unless that person's name is Bull Meechum rest assured there going to be some explaining to be done and some consequences to be had."

 

Swaying

New member
35
7
DC, USA
Military ... not governed by the FAA
Not true. Military pilots are subject to FAR in federal airspace unless there is a written exemption. I'm way rusty on that stuff, 10 yrs plus 3 days since my last flight actually, but every military pilot knows that unless the got winged in the 1940s. Funny comment about MOA's though because my understanding back then was that civil pilots could and did ignore them completely and blast right through, the advisory call from ATC that " x MOA is active" was purely advisory.  Could ignore them as a mil pilot too if we were passing through the area, not participating.  Re flying over a stadium, I vaguely recall a prohibition against flying over crowds (sports, festival, beach etc.) below some elevation within some distance, but that obviously gets waived when the whole point of the flight is to go over a stadium full of people.  I've heard of someone getting called on the carpet for flying over a ski resort in season, though that was because high ranking officer was a witness and tracked down the aircraft. Not from an FAA flight violation investigation.

Re the flyover video. There's a saying something like the only thing you can do in a helo to impress someone is crash. Problem is there are 60,000 people in the stadium, you're trying to impress them by nature of the event, what can a helo pilot do?  Fly low. Or too low, in this case. Definitely should have briefed any obstacles and had a minimum altitude not to break. Don't know anything about this except the video above, don't even know if this is recent or from years ago so I'm only speculating. If there was a cable across the top of the stadium they got lucky they missed it, and I have to believe there's no way they would have tried to fly under it intentionally.

 

Swaying

New member
35
7
DC, USA
Guess I'm waffling here, but just watched the cockpit view again and on the other hand it doesn't look all that bad from there.  If you're used to flying low and close to obstacles like the 101st does all the time, I could see why the pilots would feel going between the light towers wasn't that big a deal.  They land in LZ's at night with a lot less clearance than that, and seemed like they were going fairly slow.  But perception counts so they may find out the reward didn't justify the risk even if they didn't think it was risky.  That mystery cable in the cell phone video is the thing that really bothers me though so I'm leaning towards the optical illusion explanation.  From the video that's level with them, it does not look like any of them were low enough to go under a cable spanning the stadium. But I'm only speculating based on limited evidence, and I'm often wrong.

 




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