The AC 37 has started, news and rumours

Sailbydate

Super Anarchist
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Kohimarama
In case of 1-1 event, I'd ask Max sirena (and Patrizio), to spend one year in New Zealand of DAILY racings against vs American Magic so that both teams can improve and experiment modifications on existing boats
Old school approach. Use the proven technology. It's much faster and way less expensive, once developed.

 

KiwiJoker

Super Anarchist
3,734
324
Auckland, NZ
FWIW, this is a copy of the Commodore's letter.  Not as dramatic as hopped-up Granny Herald would have it but certainly a thumbs down on a one-on-one match in Cowes. Interestingly enough, a thumbs-up on the AC 75 Class.












March 20, 2021, for immediate release. 
 
New York Yacht Club Congratulates Emirates Team
New Zealand on Winning the 36th America's Cup

On behalf of the membership of the New York Yacht Club, I want to congratulate the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron and Emirates Team New Zealand for winning the 36th America’s Cup. It was a memorable competition, sailed in the remarkable AC75 yachts, and it reinforced why the America’s Cup remains a singular trophy in the world of sport. I also want to thank the people of New Zealand, led by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, for successfully hosting this competition during such a challenging time. I was privileged to be in New Zealand to witness it in person.
 
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Among the most unique aspects of the America’s Cup is that the competition is reborn after every victory, when the newly minted Defender and the Challenger of Record form a partnership to craft the rules, known as the Protocol, for the next match. It’s a tremendous responsibility to represent all potential challengers. The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron and the Royal Yacht Squadron hold the future of our sport’s premier trophy in the palm of their collective hands.

As part of the New York Yacht Club's return to this great competition after two decades away, we spent significant time developing a draft Protocol that would blend the history, tradition and idiosyncrasies that makes the America's Cup so special with the commercial tools and non-partisan governance required to succeed in the world of modern sport. When our challenger, New York Yacht Club American Magic, was eliminated from the competition, we shared this Protocol with every competitor in the 36th America's Cup and a number of key Cup stakeholders. It was very well received by nearly everyone who read it. We are encouraged to see that, according to the press release from Emirates Team New Zealand, the Protocol for the 37th America's Cup will incorporate at least some of the tenets of our vision, including stronger nationality rules, a commitment to multiple cycles in the same boat, a more powerful event authority and cost-reduction measures.

However, a Deed of Gift match off the Isle of Wight, as reported by the New Zealand Herald to be under consideration, would be a huge step in the wrong direction. The two previous Deed of Gift matches, in 1988 and 2010, were distinct low points in the history of the America's Cup. Regardless of the conditions, the New York Yacht Club will not support a Deed of Gift match or an America's Cup competition that, due to the schedule and rules for competition, is effectively open to only the Defender and Challenger of Record.

The AC75 is a remarkable boat that will only produce closer and more exciting competition in future cycles. As the world emerges from the COVID-19 pandemic, there will be a thirst for the fusion of competition, tradition and social interaction that the America's Cup can provide like no other sporting event. With the right schedule and match conditions, there is every expectation we would see a competition to rival Perth in 1987, Auckland in 2003 and Valencia in 2007. Each of those America's Cup cycles drew 10 or more teams to compete for the Auld Mug and the significant commercial interest necessary to support such a grand event. To waste this confluence of opportunity on a two-team event, to potentially once again plunge the competition into the New York State Courts, is not in the best interests of the America's Cup or the sport of sailing.

Our passion and commitment to the America’s Cup are as much a part of the New York Yacht Club now as a century ago. We can't thank enough the Principals of American Magic—Hap Fauth, Doug DeVos and Roger Penske—and the more than 500 members of the Club who contributed to the campaign for the opportunity to re-engage with the competition our Club founded more than 150 years ago and successfully defended 25 times. We are hopeful that the rules for the next Match will allow the Club to compete once again, and will put the competition on the road toward regaining its place alongside the Olympics and the World Cup of Football as one of the world’s most popular and successful sporting events.

Sincerely,
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Christopher J. Culver, Commodore
New York Yacht Club 
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JALhazmat

Super Anarchist
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Southampton
I'm confident you can find the answer on you own.
So can you, stop going on about how unfair it all is? 
 

they had a choice, continue the break down in relations with GD during AC36 or put out an olive branch fix the issues and be COR again. 
 

they didn’t and are potentially worse off for it.

 

Dave S

Member
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132
That would be quite amusing. A few teams setting up camp in NZL training and developing, learning the conditions better and filling the fuck out of the NZL media whilst the 378's are off playing catch my checkbook.
There's an interesting point here:

It seems likely that future editions run by ETNZ would continue to apply the "no two boat testing" rule - it's a reasonable way of controlling costs, and seems to have worked this time round.

*If* there were a 1-on-1 AC37 followed by a multi-challenger AC38, the protocol for AC38 doesn't apply until AC37 is over. So the teams not involved in AC37 can line up against each other and two-boat-test to their heart's content, whilst the teams involved in AC37 only have the event itself to get some real racing experience.

We've seen how quickly the teams/boats improve when they actually get to race against each other. What's going to get you to AC38 with the fastest package? Racing in AC37, or sitting it out and learning how to go fast, with only your budget dictating how much kit you can build and test?

Edit: I'm rapidly going off the 2-boat AC37 idea - I suspect AC37, whenever it takes place, will end up being a multiple-challenger event - but it's interesting to explore the implications if it did take place, and one of those is that the boats taking part might disadvantage their position in AC38 by doing so. The flipside to this is that the teams sitting it out only have it on trust that AC38 will actually be in AC75s, so maybe they can't take advantage of the opportunity...

 
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The Advocate

Super Anarchist
There's an interesting point here:

It seems likely that future editions run by ETNZ would continue to apply the "no two boat testing" rule - it's a reasonable way of controlling costs, and seems to have worked this time round.

*If* there were a 1-on-1 AC37 followed by a multi-challenger AC38, the protocol for AC38 doesn't apply until AC37 is over. So the teams not involved in AC37 can line up against each other and two-boat-test to their heart's content, whilst the teams involved in AC37 only have the event itself to get some real racing experience.

We've seen how quickly the teams/boats improve when they actually get to race against each other. What's going to get you to AC38 with the fastest package? Racing in AC37, or sitting it out and learning how to go fast, with only your budget dictating how much kit you can build and test?
There was some seriousness to my point. I agree. I noted earlier that there is nothing stopping a non 378 team from testing as much as they want.

 

Dolphin65

Member
197
64
Italy
Anyway, we have to make a promise to our selves; if the AC38 is held in New Zealand we shall assist the event together on Kiwis waters! I'll get a 2 months gap from my job

 

JALhazmat

Super Anarchist
4,055
1,558
Southampton
There's an interesting point here:

It seems likely that future editions run by ETNZ would continue to apply the "no two boat testing" rule - it's a reasonable way of controlling costs, and seems to have worked this time round.

*If* there were a 1-on-1 AC37 followed by a multi-challenger AC38, the protocol for AC38 doesn't apply until AC37 is over. So the teams not involved in AC37 can line up against each other and two-boat-test to their heart's content, whilst the teams involved in AC37 only have the event itself to get some real racing experience.

We've seen how quickly the teams/boats improve when they actually get to race against each other. What's going to get you to AC38 with the fastest package? Racing in AC37, or sitting it out and learning how to go fast, with only your budget dictating how much kit you can build and test?
That’s fine as long as the rules and spec for aC38 are defined exactly prior to AC37 or you are just sailing your boats around with no idea of the criteria that will apply to them other than being a 75ft foiling mono hull. 
 

plus if you are doing this is shoots a hole in the argument to reject the two cup cycle proposal, if you hated the idea of being dictated too so much you wouldn’t be two boat testing 

 

strider470

Super Anarchist
So can you, stop going on about how unfair it all is? 
 

they had a choice, continue the break down in relations with GD during AC36 or put out an olive branch fix the issues and be COR again. 
 

they didn’t and are potentially worse off for it.
I'm still convinced that a 1 - 1 Match, in the contest of modern era AC, is totally unfair and against sportmanship and the good of the America's Cup itself. And if Prada had made such a proposal to ETNZ after AC35 (they had the means to do that if wanted) I would have been disgusted as well.

This could be a precedent that could bring more 1 - 1 matches in the future. It's perfectly legal, but is not good at all, in my opinion.

 

Sailbydate

Super Anarchist
11,174
2,960
Kohimarama
There's an interesting point here:

It seems likely that future editions run by ETNZ would continue to apply the "no two boat testing" rule - it's a reasonable way of controlling costs, and seems to have worked this time round.

*If* there were a 1-on-1 AC37 followed by a multi-challenger AC38, the protocol for AC38 doesn't apply until AC37 is over. So the teams not involved in AC37 can line up against each other and two-boat-test to their heart's content, whilst the teams involved in AC37 only have the event itself to get some real racing experience.

We've seen how quickly the teams/boats improve when they actually get to race against each other. What's going to get you to AC38 with the fastest package? Racing in AC37, or sitting it out and learning how to go fast, with only your budget dictating how much kit you can build and test?
Training camps work well for the, French. One of the reasons why they're world leading ocean racers.

But it's not the smart way to design development. Two boat testing is old school. Simulators, AI and Bots are now where it's at. Much cheaper and quicker, once the software is developed. 

 

dogwatch

Super Anarchist
16,171
1,225
South Coast, UK
*If* there were a 1-on-1 AC37 followed by a multi-challenger AC38, the protocol for AC38 doesn't apply until AC37 is over. So the teams not involved in AC37 can line up against each other and two-boat-test to their heart's content, whilst the teams involved in AC37 only have the event itself to get some real racing experience.
True but if and only if there are other teams out there with the considerable funding needed to do that.  Unclear that is true.

As a thought, can they in fact stay put in Auckland? Who owns/controls the team bases and what agenda might they have?

 

The Advocate

Super Anarchist
That’s fine as long as the rules and spec for aC38 are defined exactly prior to AC37 or you are just sailing your boats around with no idea of the criteria that will apply to them other than being a 75ft foiling mono hull. 
 

plus if you are doing this is shoots a hole in the argument to reject the two cup cycle proposal, if you hated the idea of being dictated too so much you wouldn’t be two boat testing 
Too many logical fallacies to deal with here.

 
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