The debate over assault weapons

Pertinacious Tom

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Shootist Jeff said:
This is probably an example of an extraordinary .22 in the hands of a teenager.  But she's less likely to be able to shoot up a skool with it than even tom's ordinary one.  

How many people are shooting that gun anyway? Her left arm appears to go down in front of her body then this other arm wearing clothes that don't match is coming up from the bottom?

Or maybe I should ask: Where were pretty girls with three arms and the ability to afford a ridiculous gun like that one when I was a kid?

I can't tell what's going on with that stock but it looks like it might be one with adjustable length. People usually want that so that they can conceal their .22 and go shoot up a school. Why do target shooters want it?

 

sail611

Member
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Shootist Jeff said:
This is probably an example of an extraordinary .22 in the hands of a teenager.  But she's less likely to be able to shoot up a skool with it than even tom's ordinary one.  

And why is she less able to shoot up a school with this gun as opposed to other guns???? (serious question, btw)

 

Nice!

Super Anarchist
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Step 1) Look at countries that have fewer gun deaths

Step 2) Copy their gun laws

Step 3) Enjoy fewer murdered children

And yes,  it really *is* that simple.

 

sail611

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Nice, I agree, but I think in the US we need to look at the other things they do as well.  IE universal healthcare (including mental health care), living wages, maternity leave, etc, etc, etc, etc.  but we can't (won't) because.....profits and stuff.

 

mikewof

mikewof
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It depends upon who's definition you use.  The point that y'all have lost the bubble on after Tom's incessant, but accurate rambling is that attempting to define the legality of a thing based upon aesthetic and unimportant factors is a fool's errand.   

"Corvettes are race cars - cars that can do 200MPH shouldn't be allowed on the streets, that's not safe".   I agree - going 200MPH on the streets ISN'T safe, but, we don't outlaw 'Vettes 'cause they can do it. 
Good point. And yet, Audis, Corvettes and such have different kinds of safety limits, interlocks and speed limiters in those vehicles to prevent them from hitting those speeds without a prepared driver. Why? Because these automakers have been successfully sued when their machines didn't prevent a sufficient safety barrier. The firearms industry is largely immune from such lawsuits.

 

Nice!

Super Anarchist
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Victoria, BC
Good point. And yet, Audis, Corvettes and such have different kinds of safety limits, interlocks and speed limiters in those vehicles to prevent them from hitting those speeds without a prepared driver. Why? Because these automakers have been successfully sued when their machines didn't prevent a sufficient safety barrier. The firearms industry is largely immune from such lawsuits.
Not to mention, operation of a motor vehicle requires a license that requires significant training and state-operated testing to prove competency. It also requires mandatory insurance with prescribed minimal coverage.. Plus each vehicle is tracked in a database by serial number (VIN) to track ownership and reduce nefarious usage.

Maybe guns should have all those things.

 

mikewof

mikewof
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Shootist Jeff said:
This is probably an example of an extraordinary .22 in the hands of a teenager.  But she's less likely to be able to shoot up a skool with it than even tom's ordinary one.  

That photo is a little odd, the manufacturer of the sport rifle, Anschutz, is the same name of the medical school in which the Aurora theater shooter developed his psychopathy, and which they refused to release his medical report.

 

mikewof

mikewof
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Not to mention, operation of a motor vehicle requires a license that requires significant training and state-operated testing to prove competency. It also requires mandatory insurance with prescribed minimal coverage.. Plus each vehicle is tracked in a database by serial number (VIN) to track ownership and reduce nefarious usage.

Maybe guns should have all those things.
True. When I was a kid, we could have our learner's permit for all of one day, and apply for our license the day we turned 16. No mandatory classes, nothing more than a pass on the little driver's test.

Times have changed in this state ... now the teenager has to pass a series of written tests before they get the learner's permit, then they have to keep the learner's permit for a full year, log at least a hundred driving hours, then take a behind-the-wheel course, and pass two more tests before they are allowed to drive without an adult. Then for the next several months they can't drive alone past midnight, and they aren't allowed to have friends in the car with them. 

You're right, if that level of oversight was required with firearms, it might be a different kind of landscape in the homicides column.

 

bpm57

Super Anarchist
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New Jersey
That photo is a little odd, the manufacturer of the sport rifle, Anschutz, is the same name of the medical school in which the Aurora theater shooter developed his psychopathy, and which they refused to release his medical report.
You find it odd that a name might be found elsewhere in the world? The german company JG Anschutz has been around since 1856 building firearms.  I doubt they have anything to do with a US medical school.

 

mikewof

mikewof
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You find it odd that a name might be found elsewhere in the world? The german company JG Anschutz has been around since 1856 building firearms.  I doubt they have anything to do with a US medical school.
Yeah, it's just an odd thing to notice is all.

The Colorado Anschutz family seems to have nothing in common with the German rifle maker, they've been in the USA for since about the late 1800s, they came here about the same time my Grandad came down from Canada. Kind of an interesting guy, he's one of those super Christians, the very conservative kind, but he owns a good bit of U.S. Pro Soccer, and he gives hundreds of millions (literally) to good causes like the medical center. Though, he's a billionaire, so hundreds of millions is still probably what he needs to donate to not lose it to the IRS. He has an older sister who still owns a very pretty ranch near my great uncles old land on the Western Slope. They're a good family.

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
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I’m sure you’re going to post a picture soon. 
Actually, I was going to wait until I own one and then show it.

But I can go ahead and put a pic of some marketing material on it for you.

DiFiScreenshotTruth.jpg


 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
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Punta Gorda FL
On 5/23/2018 at 6:29 AM, Uncooperative Tom said:

I first learned about the Intratec TEC 22 in marketing material found here.

Never heard of it before, but now that I know it's a naughty assault weapon, I kind of want one.

So I went to gunbroker.

That raised more questions than it answered. They seem to range from a couple hundred to about $600. Several of the ads tout "pre-ban" weapons.

I don't know which ban they're talking about but I'm Uncooperative enough to want to go around it by default.

I see that some have threaded barrels and someone is selling a "vented barrel shroud" which I think is a kind of shoulder thing that goes up.



 
G

Guest

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Good point. And yet, Audis, Corvettes and such have different kinds of safety limits, interlocks and speed limiters in those vehicles to prevent them from hitting those speeds without a prepared driver. Why? Because these automakers have been successfully sued when their machines didn't prevent a sufficient safety barrier. The firearms industry is largely immune from such lawsuits.
They do????  I am not aware of that feature.  How does the car know when there is a pro driver vs a poorly trained driver at the wheel so it knows when to unlock the fun gear?

 

mikewof

mikewof
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They do????  I am not aware of that feature.  How does the car know when there is a pro driver vs a poorly trained driver at the wheel so it knows when to unlock the fun gear?
You have to unlock it in the Tesla. I guess it's done via the computer. In the Audi s-series it just cuts your speed when you hit some limit, around 130 or 140, because the car's tires and aerodynamics aren't built to safely go faster than that, even though I assume those rockets will go much faster. The Nissan Skyline's system is way more advanced. The internal GPS limits the vehicle to 110 or 120 mph, but when when it sees you're on one of the pre-approved tracks, the speed limiter circuit is turned off and you can drive her like a raped ape. I think with some of them though, accessing the unsafe speeds requires a chip change.

 
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