The Discarded- Rescuing a Tartan 33

stickboy

Super Anarchist
1,217
3
Maine
I can't stand on a soapbox and scream 'Composter!" but you'd be doing yourself a disservice if you don't consider it. PM me if you want. Mine's been in a couple weeks so I'm no expert but a few people I consider extremely persnickety sing the praises.

 

steele

Super Anarchist
1,703
219
Land of the locks
The prior owner on my boat installed Ray i70 displays and they have been good for our use. On Defender they are priced about midway between the i50 single use version and the tri-data. They are fully configurable and can display up to 6 or 8 diferent data fields, analog images, AIS targets graphs etc. Becasue they are so flexible you could start with one and switch between big numbers or use the smaller fields, then add more as buget allows. At three years they work without problems.

IMG_1433_zpshwwqugof.jpg


 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
42,538
8,710
Eastern NC
As you can see, it's all nickel-and-dime stuff, nothing major and nothing that keeps me from sailing. The mainsail is really pretty decent. The jibs don't have any UV covers sewn on them though, so I'll need to do something about that or I'll be bagging the jibs everytime which kind of defeats the purpose of upgrading to roller furling.
Depending on how many jibs you have and how often you think you'll change them, a single sleeve could be an option as opposed to having UV covers on all of them.
+1

Sleeve will protect the jib from wind storms, too.

FB- Doug

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
61,593
1,743
Punta Gorda FL
+1 on the radio. The phone part is nice, you can hear when a call is coming in. But the real good part is having Pandora or RNR playing on those long days when you're doing some work on the boat, or when you're anchored somewhere. Music makes life nicer. I am not sure if it is ESSENTIAL but it is essential.

On the lightning strikes... A friend has a Catalina 30 she keeps up in the north part of the bay. A couple years ago, it got hit by lightning in the marina, scorched part of the boat, killed all the electronics, and blew a bunch of the metal bits apart. The insurance company totaled it, so she took the check, went through the boat completely herself on the rebuild, fixed everything, and went sailing on it again. The fixes took several months but the boat was better than new and appraised out that way, and at a higher value since she installed a few upgrades while fixing the lightning damage.

Fast forward two years. Lightning again hit the boat, frying everything and setting it on fire in the marina. It was as salvageable as it had been previously. The new insurance company surveyed it, totaled the boat, and cut her a check.

Which she used as the down payment on a new Beneteau. The first time was luck, the second time was a message.
The boat I was on has since been struck again a couple of times. What are the odds? After the first strike, they upgraded the grounding system in the boat quite a bit.

There are people to whom lightning seems unnaturally attracted too.

 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,183
965
The Gorge
We could start another whole separate set of threads over these instruments. But just for the record, adding the Shipmodul mux gives you two (or five) separate command stations with ST40 and NMEA 0183 stuff. Laptop on USB at the nav station, and tablets and phones galore all over the boat via wifi. (I'm still not sure if there's a way to lock out GIlligan's phone from changing waypoints...)

Of course, I would totally dump all that and get all the newest stuff, if it wouldn't cost more than my boat.

 

HFC Hunter

Super Anarchist
Anyone informed know why instruments still cost so much?

In these days of kids using apps, some std tablet or phone hardware and some basic transducers or senders to function as satellites or control drones or perve on the girl next door, the whole gauge thing on yachts feels more and more of an arse-tear. Reading a few different numbers by pushing a button? Oooohhhh - how 21st century?!

Marine environ blah blah... So it needs a bead of 3M and better sealed connections - but 5 figures gets a lot of "better" built in?

And they don't cook French Toast yet.

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,614
2,907
Edgewater, MD
I agree, the stuff is pricey. These guys may put themselves out of business.

As for a UV sleeve for all my jibs, that's a no-go. Chesapeake PHRF requires a UV cover sewn onto the jibs.

 

Crash

Super Anarchist
5,024
971
SoCal
Only if taking the RF credit. Also means no changing jibs during a race or regatta. So were you ever to do a two day regatta (think Screwpile or SBRW) and it was light air on one day and heavy the next, you would not be able to change Genoa for a jib...

 
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Ishmael

Yes, we have no bananas
50,948
11,248
Fuctifino
I know mine are sewn, I just had a few seams re-sewn. Replacing the sacrificial cloth every few years is necessary, it would be close to impossible if it was glued on.

Of course, there are some people who just buy a new one...

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,614
2,907
Edgewater, MD
Only if taking the RF credit. Also means no changing jibs during a race or regatta. So were you ever to do a two day regatta (think Screwpile or SBRW) and it was light air on one day and heavy the next, you would not be able to change Genoa for a jib...
I've never done a multi-day W/L sausage fest and I'm not ever likely to. I have no crew. My racing is limited to distance races and sometimes, Wednesday nights around the cans, though thanks to the asshole behavior at PCRC, I'm not likely to race in their Wednesday night series again.

According to what I'm reading in the Ches PHRF rules, it's true that you can't change sails during a race, but it's less clear that you can't change them between days on a regatta.

Where are you seeing that part?

 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
42,538
8,710
Eastern NC
I agree, the stuff is pricey. These guys may put themselves out of business.

As for a UV sleeve for all my jibs, that's a no-go. Chesapeake PHRF requires a UV cover sewn onto the jibs.
No, they don't. THey just hand you a penalty if you don't play by their stupid set of desired behaviors.

Ultraconformist pea-brains form the majority on any rating committee. Many many examples, most of whom have a very fixed set of ideas about what a "racing sailboat" should be like. Instead of producing fair racing, they want to encourag everyone to get the kind of boat they like. You don't have to play that game. Set up your boat so it is practical and sails well, join in races if you like (and tell 'em what fuckin' pinheads they are... tactfully of course).

FB- Doug

 

Crash

Super Anarchist
5,024
971
SoCal
Only if taking the RF credit. Also means no changing jibs during a race or regatta. So were you ever to do a two day regatta (think Screwpile or SBRW) and it was light air on one day and heavy the next, you would not be able to change Genoa for a jib...
I've never done a multi-day W/L sausage fest and I'm not ever likely to. I have no crew. My racing is limited to distance races and sometimes, Wednesday nights around the cans, though thanks to the asshole behavior at PCRC, I'm not likely to race in their Wednesday night series again.

According to what I'm reading in the Ches PHRF rules, it's true that you can't change sails during a race, but it's less clear that you can't change them between days on a regatta.

Where are you seeing that part?
It's in 17.c.

17. Requirements for Roller Furler (RF) Credit

A. The RF genoa/jib must be tacked above the RF drum and have the head (or pennant) secured to the bottom of the upper swivel at all times while racing except while changing the genoa/jib.

B. RF headsails may be constructed of any material, but laminated sails must be protected by continuous woven taffeta skins on both sides, and all RF sails must have a 4.0 oz minimum woven UV cover present on both the leech and foot.

C. The roller furling headsail, once hoisted, shall not be changed during a day, race, series, or regatta, unless conditions warrant use of heavy weather sail, as defined by section 4.26 of the special regulations for safety requirements. If conditions during a race have warranted the use of a heavy weather sail, as defined by section 4.26 of the special regulations for safety requirements, and during the course of the race these conditions have abated, it is permissible to hoist the standard RF headsail for that sailboat.

D. If second jib or genoa is flown, it need not conform to 17B, but shall never be flown without the roller furling jib or genoa also set.

E. The RF mainsail must be furled on a drum and spindle mechanism mounted within the mast or boom extrusion. RF mainsails with full-length battens that furl within the boom will receive a reduced credit. RF mizzen sails shall comply to the same requirements as the mainsail. RF mainsails equipped with air battens shall not have their pressure adjusted during the race.

F. No credit will be given for roller reefing booms, where the mainsail is rolled around the boom.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
67,250
11,604
Great Wet North
Anyone informed know why instruments still cost so much?

In these days of kids using apps, some std tablet or phone hardware and some basic transducers or senders to function as satellites or control drones or perve on the girl next door, the whole gauge thing on yachts feels more and more of an arse-tear. Reading a few different numbers by pushing a button? Oooohhhh - how 21st century?!

Marine environ blah blah... So it needs a bead of 3M and better sealed connections - but 5 figures gets a lot of "better" built in?

And they don't cook French Toast yet.
Mostly because their sales are measured in thousands, not 10's of millions like the phones & apps you compare them to.

Specialized stuff is always expensive, even when it's very similar to mass market stuff.

You can use a phone GPS app to navigate but a big, dedicated, sunlight viewable plotter is a hell of a lot better - and only 3 times the cost of an I-Phone.

 
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zedboy

Member
257
0
Eastern Med
But shouldn't I just write a web page that pulls data from the laptop running OpenCRM and display it on sunlight-visible e-paper nooks or kindles at <$99/ea. (Running over the wifi)?

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,614
2,907
Edgewater, MD
But shouldn't I just write a web page that pulls data from the laptop running OpenCRM and display it on sunlight-visible e-paper nooks or kindles at <$99/ea. (Running over the wifi)?
If you can make Nooks or Kindles that will tolerate the salt air corrosion on their charging ports and splash-proof them, sure!

Same goes for the laptop. Actually, laptops are rather quaint. It should be a stick computer running some thin version of windows or Android Marshmallow.

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,614
2,907
Edgewater, MD
Gusting to the 30's yesterday and my reefing lines aren't fully rigged yet so I spent the day cleaning and organizing.

Swapped in my own Manson Supreme and anchor rode from the "toy" racing anchor and rode. (Hey, I can always put it back for racing)

Removed 5 large, dead wasp nests the size of your palm. 2 of them were re-inhabited by a couple of wasps.

Simple Green'd and shop vac'd the bilge.

Spent a lot of time removing old gear and optimizing the storage of my gear. I like tools to be readily available and not buried under stuff but also not taking up prime real estate for other things.

I have a new SOS Danbuoy but the Lifesling that came with the boat is a rotted piece of junk. Oh- I found the Cunningham tackle. Just need to reeve a line and install it.

I got a Standard Horizon GX2200 VHF for my birthday. Looking forward to installing that. In a few months I'll get a DMK-11 yacht box to pump the AIS data to my iPad chartplotter. (Thanks, Illegal Smile!)

Still ever more cleaning to do. I might run a reefing line and go sailing after work. This ain't a museum restoration, ya know.

 

Crash

Super Anarchist
5,024
971
SoCal
Thread drift alert!

Talking museum restorations...Hawker Hurricane (WWII British Battle of Britain Fighter), aft section of fuselage was wood, and bolted together. Design called for WWII version of nylock nuts, so vibration wouldn't loosen the bolts holding the aft fuse together. Due to wartime shortages, not enough nuts, so instead, end of bolts were peened/mushroomed over so nuts couldn't loosen. This was what was done on Smithsonian's example. Smithsonian mandate is to use as many original pieces as possible. So volunteer restorers spent 100s of hours filing the ends of the bolts back to reverse the mushrooming, so fuse could be taken apart and restored. After wood sections were restored old nuts and bolts went back in, and were re-mushroomed. All this of course is not observable, as it is under the fabric skin of the aircraft...

That's the standard we expect Ajax!

 
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