The Discarded- Rescuing a Tartan 33

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,614
2,907
Edgewater, MD
I try to adhere to a high standard. I don't always make it, though.

Instead of sailing yesterday, I ended up doing more cleaning and repairs. The wind was still up a bit and I still didn't have a cunningham or reefing line run yet so I finally took care of those, but I had to waste time driving to town for some line. Now that these items are rigged, winds will be less than 10kts for the next 4 months. :rolleyes:

I de-installed and removed the wiring for the old, dead Davis "Weather Commander" wind instruments.

Replaced the dead, corroded Aqua Signal red/green nav light.

Removed the dead stereo and bought a cheap, drop-in replacement, on sale.

 

zedboy

Member
257
0
Eastern Med
But shouldn't I just write a web page that pulls data from the laptop running OpenCRM and display it on sunlight-visible e-paper nooks or kindles at <$99/ea. (Running over the wifi)?
If you can make Nooks or Kindles that will tolerate the salt air corrosion on their charging ports and splash-proof them, sure!

Same goes for the laptop. Actually, laptops are rather quaint. It should be a stick computer running some thin version of windows or Android Marshmallow.
Was going to put the nooks/kindles in some kind of totally sealed box (except for rubber-grommetted charging port). They are cheap enough and big enough I think I can skip buttons to switch the display.

I assumed everyone keeps a normal laptop below for OpenCPN and whatever other stuff.

Looking around at sub-$100 anemometers. Will keep the class up to date as this progresses. I already have a spare nook so planning for very low initial investment.

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,614
2,907
Edgewater, MD
Yep, keep us informed. I'm curious.

I tried to keep a laptop onboard, but one broke free and smashed itself and the other literally baked itself to death in the Chesapeake summer heat.

I'd need a Toughbook or something.

 

py26129

Super Anarchist
2,827
166
Montreal
Toughbooks are the way to go. I rescued one from the "to be discarded" heap where I used to work and it has been earning its living on the boat ever since. It seems to do fin in the heat and does not mind getting spashed it it's out in the cockpit on a rough day.

Re. anemometers: you can always do your own. Take 3 tablespoon measuring spoons, a cap form a rattle can, a bearing (e. from an old VCR) and a $10 Bike speedometer from Walmart. Cut some slots into the rattle can cap and hot glue the measuring spoon into the cap so the look like a set of anemometer cups. Glue the bearing into the center of the cap. Find a pole of suitable length (I used an old sawed off stanchion) and glue the cap & bearing to the top of that. Stick the magnet from the bike speedo into the cap and tie wrap the sensor from the speedo to the pole so it "sees the the magnet go by. Calibrate the until with your wife's hair dryer and a borrowed anemometer. Done, for $20 or less.

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Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,614
2,907
Edgewater, MD
That is incredibly "production" looking. Did you actually mount that on your masthead, or is it on the aft pulpit somewhere?

How long has yours been running? I feel like hot glue wouldn't last very long.

 

zedboy

Member
257
0
Eastern Med
Re. anemometers: you can always do your own. Take 3 tablespoon measuring spoons, a cap form a rattle can, a bearing (e. from an old VCR) and a $10 Bike speedometer from Walmart. Cut some slots into the rattle can cap and hot glue the measuring spoon into the cap so the look like a set of anemometer cups. Glue the bearing into the center of the cap. Find a pole of suitable length (I used an old sawed off stanchion) and glue the cap & bearing to the top of that. Stick the magnet from the bike speedo into the cap and tie wrap the sensor from the speedo to the pole so it "sees the the magnet go by. Calibrate the until with your wife's hair dryer and a borrowed anemometer. Done, for $20 or less.

attachicon.gif
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MADE MY DAY

+++++++++LOTS

Take that Raymarine.

Py if you come to Ottawa in the last week of August I will buy you a beer.

 

py26129

Super Anarchist
2,827
166
Montreal
Ajax, I did not mount it at the mast hear but at the aft end of the boat (I had a installed a small set of davits for the kayak) as high as I could. It worked great unless the wind was right on the nose when the dodger disturbed the wind too much. I had it running for three years without any issue other than replacing the battery in the bike speedo, once / year. The hot glue held up without an issue. What also surprised me was that the rattle can lid did not seem to be affected by the UV at all. When we bought the new boat it came with a mast head unit and McGyver job has lived in the basement ever since.

Zedder, a visit to Ottawa can be arranged. It;s a great excuse to drop by Lee Valley!

 

Rantifarian

Rantifarian
Yep, keep us informed. I'm curious.

I tried to keep a laptop onboard, but one broke free and smashed itself and the other literally baked itself to death in the Chesapeake summer heat.

I'd need a Toughbook or something.
A lot of manufacturers make education spec laptops too, which are designed for people actively trying to destroy a computer and avoid doing work. they tend to be cheaper, lower spec and longer battery than many other toughbooks
 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,614
2,907
Edgewater, MD
Ok, got some battens in the mainsail to replace the two that got flogged out in a strong breeze. I'll still need to sew the pockets shut. I noted that the velcro is quite worn on some of the pockets.

I also scrubbed out the stbd water tank (hooray for clean-out ports!) and recommissioned the pressure water system. It works!
I made a mess of the process though. The water heater tank valves were open, so I ended up pumping the water tank contents straight through the water heater and into the bilge before I figured out what the hell was going on. This also introduced a lot of air into the system which required me to run the pump for a long time to burp it all out.

The water heater has no electric connection and uses engine coolant for heat. I really have no intention of using the water heater so I shut the valves, drained the tank into the bilge and now it's a "dead head" as far as the pump is concerned. To test for leaks, I shut the system off for several minutes and then flipped the breaker back on and the pump did not run unless I opened a cold water faucet, so everything seems to be in order.

After 7 years of "camping" with hand pumps in the Coronado and then the Pearson, I did marvel open-mouthed at the water running from the faucets. I'm glad no one was around to witness. The thought of glorious, refreshing showers at anchor after a hot, sticky day on the Chesapeake makes me cheerful. Even a brief "submarine shower" will be better than what I had. The water pump is an old but very solid looking ITT Jabsco belt-driven diaphram pump. Looks like a 36660 or 36680, which is pricey but still available.

Filling the bilge with fresh water gave me the opportunity to test out the emergency manual pump in the cockpit. Works like a champ, dual-action, moves lots of water.

My new, 2000 gph Rule pump was another story. It pumps, but it seems kind of slow and output at the hull discharge was not what I expected. I'm going to have to investigate this and perhaps replace the hose. It seems to be pumping against something. The drain hose to the hull skin fitting is brand-new, so that's not the problem. It's got to be the run from the bilge to the engine compartment where it T's in with the manual pump.

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,614
2,907
Edgewater, MD
May I also suggest a solar shower? We used one last year cruusing to Baltimore around labor day and it was glorious.
For hot water? I have one.

Labor Day? Whew, the last thing I want on Labor Day weekend is a *hot* shower. During the transitional periods between warm and cool, sure they're great.

What's with people around here? Whenever I'd use the solar shower for a rinse in the cockpit, people in the anchorage stare in an obnoxious manner (and yes, I had a swimsuit on!)

 

Ishmael

Yes, we have no bananas
50,948
11,248
Fuctifino
May I also suggest a solar shower? We used one last year cruusing to Baltimore around labor day and it was glorious.
For hot water? I have one.

Labor Day? Whew, the last thing I want on Labor Day weekend is a *hot* shower. During the transitional periods between warm and cool, sure they're great.

What's with people around here? Whenever I'd use the solar shower for a rinse in the cockpit, people in the anchorage stare in an obnoxious manner (and yes, I had a swimsuit on!)
Were you shaving your back in public again?

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,614
2,907
Edgewater, MD
First, it's rusty inside. The nasty water that came out makes me think it's not long for this world.

B. It's not wired up electrically and heating it by running an unloaded diesel is hard on the engine and takes forever.

IV. I personally prefer cool showers when it's hot as hell out. The tank water is going to be around 80-85 degrees. That's not cold.

For washing up dishes I could see the utility but I can also use an electric kettle driven by an inverter.

It has been pointed out to me that the engine would effectively heat water while I'm motoring into an anchorage or the last leg towards a marina, while it's loaded vs. unloaded after I'm anchored.

 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
61,593
1,743
Punta Gorda FL
First, it's rusty inside. The nasty water that came out makes me think it's not long for this world.

B. It's not wired up electrically and heating it by running an unloaded diesel is hard on the engine and takes forever.

IV. I personally prefer cool showers when it's hot as hell out. The tank water is going to be around 80-85 degrees. That's not cold.

...
That's true, but close. 79 degrees is where cold starts.

I'm curious about a submarine shower. I figured modern ones have a bigass water maker and the crew could shower as long as they wanted. No?

 
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