The Ocean Race 2023 leg 3: Capetown to Itajaí, Brazil

bbl

Anarchist
737
6
Norway
Is "chinese gybe" considered insensitive nowadays? Like if my muscle memory kicked in and I said it on a US boat would I get weird looks?
In Norway, we call it "a Chinese" ("en kineser"). I always believed (but may be wrong) that the origin of the term is due to the fact that you end up facing down. Down being China from the misconception that China is on the other side of the globe, as in "if you dig far enough you'll end up in China", which from Norway is also wrong.

Anyway, it's not _meant_ as derogative towards the Chinese. Still, giving an unwanted incident the name of a country by way of random association might (rightfully) not be well received, so I think it should be avoided.
 

littlechay

Super Anarchist
1,205
657
Nelson
If there is unknown current (speed and direction) and leeway angle is unknown too, then the answer is no. But TWA, TWS and AWA already give you AWS if there is no leeway and no current. TWD is not useful at all, and SOG is only relevant for the case current and leeway are to be accounted for, and is not enough if both factors are fully unknown.
leeway and current are not used to calculate TWx. If you take those factors into account you are calculating Ground Wind. Counter intuitive but in sailing terms that's how it is.
 

Fabricensis

Member
92
107
Bit of an eeky question but I have noticed that all the French teams say "chinese gybe" all over their social media/interviews and so on without issue. I'm French, I was raised in France and learned to sail over there, and I also learned to say "chinese gybes".
However it seems like the other teams and SA people use "unintentional gybe" and so on. Again, I don't really know the situation here in the US sailing world though I've lived in Massachusetts for a number of years, which is why I'm asking.

Is "chinese gybe" considered insensitive nowadays? Like if my muscle memory kicked in and I said it on a US boat would I get weird looks?
In German it's called "Patenthalse" or license gybe. Every language has its own name but do we need to use the US or British terms just because they happen to be the ones speaking English?
 

mathystuff

Super Anarchist
1,248
878
In Norway, we call it "a Chinese" ("en kineser"). I always believed (but may be wrong) that the origin of the term is due to the fact that you end up facing down. Down being China from the misconception that China is on the other side of the globe, as in "if you dig far enough you'll end up in China", which from Norway is also wrong.

Anyway, it's not _meant_ as derogative towards the Chinese. Still, giving an unwanted incident the name of a country by way of random association might (rightfully) not be well received, so I think it should be avoided.
It's a patent gybe in german.

I support your motion to rename it to australian gybe, tho.
 

balticsea

German, Baltic Sea
1
4

LIVE FROM THE OCEAN RACE ITAJAÍ (looks like a habour cam now)​


Hi, all, up to minutes before i was reading only, i read interessing things, sometimes have a question, now, as i find these live channel i made my registration.​

German, from the baltic sea, sailing for decades​

 
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giegs

Super Anarchist
1,159
664
There's been several mentions of damaged sails being unavailable for future legs - is that because repair isn't allowed or because it's not possible to do a repair that will hold up within the rule restrictions? I only see an explicit mention of sail repair in reference to VO65 in the NOR, but it does seem allowed for IMOCA as well.
 

noaano

Anarchist
722
363
Leeway is definitely included in the TW calculations in any decent instrument system.

It could be or not, but would then AWA and TWA be angles of different reference frame?

That is the important part.

The question was calculating AWS.

If they are same frame, they form a wind triangle, whether referenced to COG, COW or HDG.
 
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There's been several mentions of damaged sails being unavailable for future legs - is that because repair isn't allowed or because it's not possible to do a repair that will hold up within the rule restrictions? I only see an explicit mention of sail repair in reference to VO65 in the NOR, but it does seem allowed for IMOCA as well.
"Sails are also expensive, which is why the IMOCA Class and The Ocean Race rules place a maximum limit on the number of sails permitted during the race.

"Thomas Jullien, IMOCA Class Measurer, explains the limits: “As per the IMOCA class rule, they are allowed to sail with a maximum of eight sails on board, one of which has to be the storm jib, which is mandatory. Then there is a rule specific to The Ocean Race, which is that each team is allowed to use a total of 11 sails plus the storm jib for the whole round the world race.”

There was a quote coming out of Cape Town in which one of the teams was glad that they recovered a damaged sail, because it COULD be repaired and didn't count against the cap. Can't remember which boat, may have been TM.

 

Chasm

Super Anarchist
2,671
523
There's been several mentions of damaged sails being unavailable for future legs - is that because repair isn't allowed or because it's not possible to do a repair that will hold up within the rule restrictions? I only see an explicit mention of sail repair in reference to VO65 in the NOR, but it does seem allowed for IMOCA as well.
Sails can be (and do get) repaired.
Replacement material is limited to 25% of the original area, so no Ship Sail of Theseus.
 

tiljim

Malizian
81
104
There was a quote coming out of Cape Town in which one of the teams was glad that they recovered a damaged sail, because it COULD be repaired and didn't count against the cap. Can't remember which boat, may have been TM.
That was Guyot who ripped their C0 in leg 2.
 


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