The reverse of what is expected (electronics)

scassani

Member
383
3
I want to connect a Sennheiser Bluetooth Audio Transmitter to a Yamaha A-S2100 Integrated Amplifier.  The transmitter accepts input through a 3.5mm plug.  The amp has a headphone jack that could be adapted to receive a 3.5 mm plug.  Sennheiser anticipates the transmitter will be connected in this way.

My need would be met better by connecting the transmitter to the twin speaker outputs on the amp.  In this way I could toggle between Speakers 1 and 2, with 2 going to the transmitter.  The amp shuts off the signal to the speakers automatically when a plug is in the phone jack.  The automatic shut-off requires that I unplug from the phone jack on the amp every time the Bluetooth transmitter is not in use.  I cannot simply leave a plug in the phone jack and switch the transmitter off.  I can avoid wear on the plug and amp by switching from Speaker 1 (ambient sound) to Speaker 2 (Bluetooth transmitted to headphones).

I need to connect the dual 6.35 mm outputs labeled "Speaker 2" on the amp to the analog 3.5 mm single input accepted by the Sennheiser.  Connecting the devices this way seems idiosyncratic; every cable I've found works in the opposite direction.  The signal from an I Phone or like device enters the 3.5 mm end and the cable splits the signal in two for output to a speaker.  I want the amplified signal to run from Speaker 2 (left and right outputs) to a single device, the Sennheiser Transmitter. 

My need cannot be met simply by running the signal in the direction that is opposite to the design of the cable.  The splitter function (one signal to two) does not work in reverse.

Any thoughts?    

 
Any thoughts?    
give up and smoke sum sum weed and go for sum sum summin visual 

901_1000.jpg


 
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Meat Wad

Super Anarchist
I want to connect a Sennheiser Bluetooth Audio Transmitter to a Yamaha A-S2100 Integrated Amplifier.  The transmitter accepts input through a 3.5mm plug.  The amp has a headphone jack that could be adapted to receive a 3.5 mm plug.  Sennheiser anticipates the transmitter will be connected in this way.

My need would be met better by connecting the transmitter to the twin speaker outputs on the amp.  In this way I could toggle between Speakers 1 and 2, with 2 going to the transmitter.  The amp shuts off the signal to the speakers automatically when a plug is in the phone jack.  The automatic shut-off requires that I unplug from the phone jack on the amp every time the Bluetooth transmitter is not in use.  I cannot simply leave a plug in the phone jack and switch the transmitter off.  I can avoid wear on the plug and amp by switching from Speaker 1 (ambient sound) to Speaker 2 (Bluetooth transmitted to headphones).

I need to connect the dual 6.35 mm outputs labeled "Speaker 2" on the amp to the analog 3.5 mm single input accepted by the Sennheiser.  Connecting the devices this way seems idiosyncratic; every cable I've found works in the opposite direction.  The signal from an I Phone or like device enters the 3.5 mm end and the cable splits the signal in two for output to a speaker.  I want the amplified signal to run from Speaker 2 (left and right outputs) to a single device, the Sennheiser Transmitter. 

My need cannot be met simply by running the signal in the direction that is opposite to the design of the cable.  The splitter function (one signal to two) does not work in reverse.

Any thoughts?    
AVS Forums is a good resource for  anything AV

https://www.avsforum.com/forums/

 

El Borracho

Sam’s friend
6,239
2,327
Pacific Rim
Expecting technology from 1877 to address a somewhat irrational and peevish issue in 2021? Okay, granted, you are using the latest upgrade to 3.5mm...from 1950....

Use the Tape Out or similar pre-amp taps? Probably via a RCA Plug from the 1930's. Or an iPhone and a Class D amp, boomer.

 

gptyk

Anarchist
570
321
California
Tape out. Center pins of the RCA to the tip and first ring of the 3.5mm. Last ring of the 3.5 mm goes to the shield (outer part) of the RCA. 

Trying to tie speaker outputs together can fry the amp. 

 
I checked online and those instructions are horrible.

Use any line level output from the source (usually tape out, in the dark ages). As gptyk says, don't use speaker or headphone outputs--you could well fry that BT transmitter. Line level outputs are much lower power than the speaker or headphone outputs and are not affected by the volume control. (The volume shouldn't be controlled at the amp, but at the receiver (whatever receives signal from the BT transmitter).)

 

scassani

Member
383
3
Thanks.  These replies are helpful.  I'm delaying any further attempt while I adjourn to the pool....

 

floating dutchman

Super Anarchist
The headphone jack has a little switch the opens when something is plugged into it, bypass that so the speakers don't shut off when the Bluetooth transmitter is plugged in.

Toggle the speakers off and on using the "speakers A" switch.

Might work.

 

warbird

Super Anarchist
16,471
1,233
lake michigan
I want to connect a Sennheiser Bluetooth Audio Transmitter to a Yamaha A-S2100 Integrated Amplifier.  The transmitter accepts input through a 3.5mm plug.  The amp has a headphone jack that could be adapted to receive a 3.5 mm plug.  Sennheiser anticipates the transmitter will be connected in this way.

My need would be met better by connecting the transmitter to the twin speaker outputs on the amp.  In this way I could toggle between Speakers 1 and 2, with 2 going to the transmitter.  The amp shuts off the signal to the speakers automatically when a plug is in the phone jack.  The automatic shut-off requires that I unplug from the phone jack on the amp every time the Bluetooth transmitter is not in use.  I cannot simply leave a plug in the phone jack and switch the transmitter off.  I can avoid wear on the plug and amp by switching from Speaker 1 (ambient sound) to Speaker 2 (Bluetooth transmitted to headphones).

I need to connect the dual 6.35 mm outputs labeled "Speaker 2" on the amp to the analog 3.5 mm single input accepted by the Sennheiser.  Connecting the devices this way seems idiosyncratic; every cable I've found works in the opposite direction.  The signal from an I Phone or like device enters the 3.5 mm end and the cable splits the signal in two for output to a speaker.  I want the amplified signal to run from Speaker 2 (left and right outputs) to a single device, the Sennheiser Transmitter. 

My need cannot be met simply by running the signal in the direction that is opposite to the design of the cable.  The splitter function (one signal to two) does not work in reverse.

Any thoughts?    
The transmitter transmits.  (No shit)  You need to get your bluetooth reciever hooked up to CD, Tape or Aux input.  If you are using the reciever as a bluetooth source you need to ask yourself 'why".

 

scassani

Member
383
3
Grande Mastere senses the outcome of me putting the question to Sennheiser:  The headphone jack is the sole means of connecting any amplifier that shares the vintage of my Yamaha A-S2100 to the Sennheiser Bluetooth Transmitter.  I purchased Bang & Olufson H4 wireless headphones to enjoy audible books on a Kindle.  As the devices are easily paired I went looking for a way to establish a similar connection with the Yamaha amp.  The sound from the headphones is excellent for speech; jazz should be heard as well and Bluetooth eliminates the need for a cable.  The route to making the connection has been circuitous in ways that should be obvious to me inasmuch as I begin with $4,000 technology from four years ago, or 1877.

This will work!  Thanks.  

 
Grande Mastere senses the outcome of me putting the question to Sennheiser:  The headphone jack is the sole means of connecting any amplifier that shares the vintage of my Yamaha A-S2100 to the Sennheiser Bluetooth Transmitter.  I purchased Bang & Olufson H4 wireless headphones to enjoy audible books on a Kindle.  As the devices are easily paired I went looking for a way to establish a similar connection with the Yamaha amp.  The sound from the headphones is excellent for speech; jazz should be heard as well and Bluetooth eliminates the need for a cable.  The route to making the connection has been circuitous in ways that should be obvious to me inasmuch as I begin with $4,000 technology from four years ago, or 1877.

This will work!  Thanks.  
i gave up and spent $400 on a nice sony amp that has all hdmi 2.1,  bluetooth,  wifi.  etc...  best thing ever..    

 

warbird

Super Anarchist
16,471
1,233
lake michigan
The transmitter transmits.  (No shit)  You need to get your bluetooth reciever hooked up to CD, Tape or Aux input.  If you are using the reciever as a bluetooth source you need to ask yourself 'why".
  If you are using the reciever AMP as a bluetooth source you need to ask yourself 'why".

 

LionessRacing

Super Anarchist
4,286
556
Myrtle Beach,
Find someone who understands "Impedance" to help you...

The input to most transmitters is expected to be line level and  usually in the 1 K ohm range and generally is a 2V peak signal

the Speakers that most people hook to amplifiers are in the 4-8 Ohm Range, depending on the power if the amplifier peak voltage is SQRT(Power*Impedance)

so for a 200 W peak output you have 40 V at 8 Ohm,

 

Mrleft8

Super Anarchist
24,577
3,062
Suwanee River
Get yerself a sansui 222 turn table, a technics 4 channel amp, a set of bose 301or 501 speakers, and go to a flea market and get a truckload of LPs for 25 bucks.

 

scassani

Member
383
3
I spoke with a technician at Sennheiser.  He advises hooking the Bluetooth Transmitter to the amplifier by way of the headphone jack.  Since this is an amplified signal the issue LionessRacing raises comes into play.  The mitigating step is to connect the amp with the transmitter, being careful to turn the volume on the amp to full silent.  Turn the transmitter on.  Turn the headphones on and wait for the phones to signal receipt of the Bluetooth signal.  That's a small red light on the B&Os.  Listen carefully while slowly increasing the volume on the amp.  Hold the volume when a signal is audible in the headphones.  Use the volume adjustment on the headphones to increase the heard volume to a desired level.

Sennheiser designs the componentry in the transmitter to withstand a signal of five ohms.  This falls at the low end of the range LionessRacing identifies as the usual thing when driving speakers.  I'm confident the steps I've described will allow me to hear jazz between my ears for a good while.

 

floating dutchman

Super Anarchist
that's what his turntable is hooked up to so he can get that audiophile sound..
Really?

Being an Audiophile is about getting the best from the equipment you can afford.  There are no barriers about quality, taste, budget or any other quirks that the owner desires.

Sound quality is achieved when the owner is happy with the result and can enjoy listening to the source, whatever that may be.

You don't have to like the end result.  The owner of the system does.

 

mikewof

mikewof
43,733
957
Really?

Being an Audiophile is about getting the best from the equipment you can afford.  There are no barriers about quality, taste, budget or any other quirks that the owner desires.

Sound quality is achieved when the owner is happy with the result and can enjoy listening to the source, whatever that may be.

You don't have to like the end result.  The owner of the system does.
I had a bunch of 78s from my grandmother's estate, pre-WWII stuff I think, not vinyl, much thicker and brittle than vinyl. I wanted to put them onto a CD for family. I had a couple of decent turntables, but none of them would play at 78 speed. I had a fake-Crosley, almost the same as in that photo from GMD's post, that had the 78 speed. But it didn't have the audio out, only a headphone plug. I spent a week fiddling with pre-amps, and impedences, I couldn't get the recording to sound right.

Then I found a brand-new Ion-brand USB record player for $30, it plugged into the computer USB. No 78 speed, but the freeware Audacity lets you change the speed from 45 to 78, and then clean up some of the dust noise, and equalize, then burn a CD. I fit about 25 lbs of pre-WWII 78s onto a single CD and they sounded better than originals. Computers have made some of this work a lot easier.

 
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