The thread for stuff that’s way outside the rules and can’t happen but let’s speculate anyway..

Mozzy Sails

Super Anarchist
1,354
1,288
United Kingdom
The use of electric, magnetic, sonic, thermal and chemical devices or patterned or textured finishes and devices that suck fluid from or blow fluid on to the surface of hull and or foils to reduce friction.
 

enigmatically2

Super Anarchist
4,249
2,227
Earth
The only way I can see that you even begin to get close to a super-cavitating foil within the rules is to use the rotation of the flap. So if the axis of rotation were a long way below the foil then when the red flap is "rotated" it would move from the left hand picture to the right. I think the rules on flexure would allow for the green to be those "flexures" (some of which are declared as part of the wing, and some part of the flap).
That would allow you to make the whole wing thicker at low speed and thinner at high speed, and also potentially bleed water from below to above the foil at the "joint". Whether this would work I doubt highly, and more importantly it would give very poor control.

1675778478358.png
 

Kiwing

Super Anarchist
3,707
666
Bay of Islands
The only way I can see that you even begin to get close to a super-cavitating foil within the rules is to use the rotation of the flap. So if the axis of rotation were a long way below the foil then when the red flap is "rotated" it would move from the left hand picture to the right. I think the rules on flexure would allow for the green to be those "flexures" (some of which are declared as part of the wing, and some part of the flap).
That would allow you to make the whole wing thicker at low speed and thinner at high speed, and also potentially bleed water from below to above the foil at the "joint". Whether this would work I doubt highly, and more importantly it would give very poor control.

View attachment 573198
I thought for super cavitating you needed thinner and shorter cord?
In the "morphing foil" thread I suggest a way to do that with oil pressure.
 

enigmatically2

Super Anarchist
4,249
2,227
Earth
I thought for super cavitating you needed thinner and shorter cord?
In the "morphing foil" thread I suggest a way to do that with oil pressure.
You need thinner - which is what that was trying to do. I think it can be longer cord (that lowers the pressure difference after all). But I don't claim to be an expert on super-cavitation so could be wrong.

Oil pressure is definitely banned by the rules, despite these being the out of rules thread i was aiming for some wild speculation that I don't think anyone will do, but might actually be legal
 

JALhazmat

Super Anarchist
4,568
1,751
Southampton
At the risk of making a sensible contribution, you need a thin and sharp leading edge, and a slightly curved wedge shape profile, with a completely squared off backend

you can’t have a halfway house or a blend of multiple profiles, and have a super cav foil

certainly in the case of the base ventilated version, it absolutely wouldn’t work as you need to be able to feed air directly down the trailing edge and establish a stable air pocket

Hence it worked for sail rocket

EC68BD61-690E-4A58-B382-10D71543C87E.jpeg
 

Varan

Super Anarchist
6,844
2,023
Hull morphing nanotechnology. Serious, a year or so ago, I posted an IEEE article about nanotubes that can be used to change the shape of carbon structures electronically. I'll look for that post...
 

Stingray~

Super Anarchist
13,129
3,630
PNW
Hull morphing nanotechnology. Serious, a year or so ago, I posted an IEEE article about nanotubes that can be used to change the shape of carbon structures electronically. I'll look for that post...
That could be fun and interesting for speculation too.

At a much more 'basic level,' if there is a compromise in your hull's lower shape between preventing windflow bleeding to lee (Iike what a deck seeping main does) by creating an endplate effect, versus the hull shape best for when you encounter swell (to improve its ability to skim or cut) then maybe that lower part of the hull could be slightly 'flexible.'
 

enigmatically2

Super Anarchist
4,249
2,227
Earth
That could be fun and interesting for speculation too.

At a much more 'basic level,' if there is a compromise in your hull's lower shape between preventing windflow bleeding to lee (Iike what a deck seeping main does) by creating an endplate effect, versus the hull shape best for when you encounter swell (to improve its ability to skim or cut) then maybe that lower part of the hull could be slightly 'flexible.'
It looks to me that all the teams with new hulls (LR, NZ and Ineos) have really improved on that compromise anyway. Their end plating (above and below deck) is much smoother, and are all getting less impacted by touching than they did next cycle. I'm sure the others will too when they launch new boats
 






Top