The US Anti-Democracy movement - i.e. the GOP

Burning Man

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I thought this was an interesting and informative, if not very chilling article, that landed in my newsfeed this am:

View in browser|nytimes.com

July 19, 2022​
Good morning. The anti-democracy movement in the U.S. started before 2020 and may endure for years.​
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Donald Trump at a rally in Memphis in June. Mark Peterson/Redux, for The New York Times​

Bigger than Trump​

On Feb. 24, 2016 — during Donald Trump’s Republican primary campaign and more than four years before he would falsely accuse Joe Biden of election fraud — somebody registered the website www.stopthesteal.org. It may have been Roger Stone, the Republican operative who was advising Trump’s 2016 campaign and appears to have coined the phrase “Stop the Steal.”​
At the time, the target of the phrase was not a Democrat. It was Ted Cruz, Trump’s closest competition for the Republican nomination. After Cruz won the Colorado caucuses in April 2016, hundreds of Trump supporters gathered at the State Capitol in Denver and chanted, “Stop the steal!” During this same period, the website posted baseless allegations claiming fraud in other states.​
This bit of history comes from Charles Homans’s latest revelatory story — which The Times Magazine has just published — about the anti-democracy movement within the Republican Party. The story’s central point is that this movement to create doubt about election results is older than many people realize and larger than Trump himself.​
“What is striking about the movement around the supposed theft of the 2020 election,” Charles writes, “is how much of it — the ideas, and rhetoric, and even the people involved in it — predated Trump’s presidency, and in some cases even his candidacy.” And as that movement continues today, it is based less on the narrow goal of restoring Trump to power and more on a missionary zeal to put right-wing candidates into office.​
The candidates running these campaigns this year, including the Republican nominee for governor in Pennsylvania and the nominees for secretary of state (the job overseeing elections) in several other states, do not talk about Trump very often. They instead cast themselves as part of a larger crusade to preserve traditional American, Christian and conservative values. As Charles explains, they “see themselves as an American people distinct from the American population — a people whose particular loyalties, identities and values designated them as the nation’s true inheritors, regardless of what the ballots might have said.”​
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Protesters in Washington the night before Jan. 6.Mark Peterson/Redux, for The New York Times​

White nationalism​

When Charles and I spoke yesterday, we spent some time mulling over why this anti-democratic movement has become a dominant force within the Republican Party now. Conspiracy theories have a long history in American politics, of course (including on the political left), but they have usually remained on the fringes. To take one example, the John Birch Society of the mid-20th century spread some similar ideas as today’s right-wing conspiracists do, but few Birchers won statewide or federal office.​
What has changed? There is no single answer, but there are a few plausible partial explanations.​
One is that many conservatives — especially white conservatives — feel more threatened than in past decades. They worry they are part of a fading minority. As Charles’s story documents, the Stop the Steal movement has strong roots in the Tea Party movement, which began early in Barack Obama’s presidency and frequently portrayed him as illegitimate and un-American.​
Obama’s election, as the first Black president, was a clear sign that the country had become more racially diverse and seemed destined to become even more so. It also happened as the country was questioning traditional ideas of gender and sexuality and becoming more secular, with religious observance declining.​
In his reporting, Charles interviewed a supporter of Doug Mastriano, the Republican nominee for governor in Pennsylvania, after a rally and asked her what she expected if Mastriano won. “I see him stepping in and going back to the Constitution — putting God back in things,” she said. “He’s about bringing everything back,” she explained. “Everything back.”​
Still, this racial and cultural reactionary response is almost certainly not the full story. After all, the U.S. has experienced more intense periods of debate over racial and gender issues — like the 1960s — without giving rise to a large anti-democracy movement. Today, several other factors also seem to play a role.​

Four more reasons​

One is the underlying level of frustration among Americans after decades of slow-growing living standards for most people. A financial crisis, which began shortly before Obama’s election, and the slow recovery from it exacerbated the dissatisfaction.​
Another factor, Charles believes, is a pandemic that has disrupted daily life and caused a further deterioration in many measures of physical and mental health, fostering a sense that society is coming apart.​
A third factor is modern media. On the internet, falsehoods can spread more quickly and be repeated more frequently than, say, the Birchers’ claim that Dwight Eisenhower was a secret communist. Fox News, meanwhile, broadcasts conspiracies to millions of viewers.​
Finally, while Trump’s role is sometimes exaggerated, it is still central. In the past, national leaders tended to reject the conspiracies; in 2008, John McCain famously corrected one of his own supporters who called Obama an Arab. Trump, by contrast, promoted lies as no other modern U.S. politician has, making them acceptable to people who otherwise might have rejected them. And once he became president, many other Republican politicians chose to echo him or at least refused to denounce him.​
That’s how the anti-democracy movement moved to the center of today’s Republican Party. For now, it still revolves around Trump. But it also has the potential to outlast him.​
 

Steam Flyer

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Thanks Jeff, worth reading.

I'm not surprised to see any of this stuff, a number of my circle of friends back then got sucked into the "Hate Clinton" movement and it transformed seamlessly into hating Democrats and hating democracy. In late 1990s I recall seeing a poll in our local paper which returned the result that ~25% of people would be in favor of a military dictatorship overthrowing the US gov't.

It all stems from the increased deluge of right-wing propaganda disguised as news and commentary. There have always been whackjobs mouthing off Bircher/conspriacist/far-right nutbaggery and apparently making a living at it, but Rush Limbaugh really opened the dam gates and then Fox News turned it into a Noah's Ark scale flood.
 

Sol Rosenberg

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If this country outlives Roger Stone, Steve Bannon and Alex Jones (and the billionaires who fund them) it will be a miracle.
 

Bugsy

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Something like 50% of Republicans believe the Big Lie (the election was stolen).

Can someone please explain how so many people can believe something so completely and demonstrably false?
 

Bus Driver

Bacon Quality Control Specialist
I believe they are angry about what life has dealt them (loss of job being the biggest factor) and they need someone to blame. The GOP honchos figured out it would be to their benefit to blame everything on those evil Democrats. Couple that with folks initially swallowing the lie being unable to admit they were duped.

If they were misled about that, what else have they been misled about? Can't allow that idea to take root.
 

MR.CLEAN

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Something like 50% of Republicans believe the Big Lie (the election was stolen).

Can someone please explain how so many people can believe something so completely and demonstrably false?
half the people you meet have an IQ below 100. The venn diagram between they and trump voters is a near circle.
 

d'ranger

Super Anarchist
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Sigh, beginning with the trickle down aka the War between the Haves and Havenots the GOP has successfully convinced the Joe the Plumbers that the decline of the working class is the Democrats fault - huge boost from all the right wing media. Last night there was an ad for NewsNation - unbiased, the way news should be etc. On our feed I saw it was WGN, so I cruised over and some guy was ranting about the Woke culture etc, later I surfed again and a different TH was ranting about liberals and crime killing small businesses.

From what I can tell its a series of people telling viewers what to think and who to be angry with. Like we really need more of this.
 

Voyageur

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Something like 50% of Republicans believe the Big Lie (the election was stolen).

Can someone please explain how so many people can believe something so completely and demonstrably false?
It is scary, yet that is still a small slice of the populace. The rest, who do not believe in false idols, need to make our voices heard, with our votes. Are republicans even 25% of the population? How the fuck do we have a SCOTUS stacked with people who are on the far right fringe of the Republican party? Has one party been stealing elections for decades?
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BeSafe

Super Anarchist
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One is the underlying level of frustration among Americans after decades of slow-growing living standards for most people. A financial crisis, which began shortly before Obama’s election, and the slow recovery from it exacerbated the dissatisfaction.

That is one of the most detached ways I could ever imagine describing the 2008 housing crash and its impact. I'm sorry, but he writes exactly as I'd imagine a 3rd generation New Yorker would describe "a brief history of 21st century America".
 




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