The watch of a yachtsman? Which one...

aloha27

Super Anarchist
casio.jpg

 
Wearing a 10K watch on a sailing boat or at the club is the sign of a poser / owner , sat on the boat doing nothing, not a yachtsman. It's too easy to get the watch ripped off by a rope and it goes for a swim.. (or ripped off by a mugger on shore..)

I wear the Casio equivalent of the Timex, one linked to the radio signal, the clubs use a radio linked clock for the count downs. So it's always correct, no need to mess around with start stop buttons, you just go by the appointed time.

There are half a dozen watches of mine keeping the fish awake down there..
Watches are indeed expensive fish fertilizer.  A very kind uncle bought this nascent Jacques Cousteau a Rolex Submariner when I graduated high school.  A few years later, on an oceanographic training cruise, we were letting out trawls.  I of course was wearing the Rolex.  It's made for tough marine use, right?

with the trawl just finished the deployment, a net mesh snagged the bracelet catch and, somehow without snagging or catching anything, the watch flew of my arm and overboard.   I REALLY thought about diving over and trying to grab it (in the opaque, winter water), but the net pulling behind us at 6 knots sunk into even my juvenile brain.  

The next year they added the backup catch to the Rolex bracelets.  I've apologized to my uncle a hundred times in the ensuing 45 or so years.  Guess I was too caught up in the image of the watch as a rugged go anywhere tool.

 

Sisu3360

Anarchist
610
198
I recently snagged this one off eBay. It's a Citizen C050, I think from the late 80s/early 90s. I like analog watches, this is my first "ani-digi."

It has a start timer with chimes at appropriate intervals, with options for rolling starts or countdown/countup. The only thing it's missing is a sync feature. The bezel is kind of interesting - I guess it's for keeping track of shifts but I don't know how useful it is.

I have a bad habit of leaving my Clearstart (the gigantic model, not the wrist-sized one) at home on race nights, so this is a neat watch with some history that I can wear to work and to the Tuesday night race after. We'll see how it goes.

unnamed (1).jpg

 

Wemedge

New member
34
16
Detroit
I recently snagged this one off eBay. It's a Citizen C050, I think from the late 80s/early 90s. I like analog watches, this is my first "ani-digi."

It has a start timer with chimes at appropriate intervals, with options for rolling starts or countdown/countup. The only thing it's missing is a sync feature. The bezel is kind of interesting - I guess it's for keeping track of shifts but I don't know how useful it is.

I have a bad habit of leaving my Clearstart (the gigantic model, not the wrist-sized one) at home on race nights, so this is a neat watch with some history that I can wear to work and to the Tuesday night race after. We'll see how it goes.

View attachment 413095
I am wearing the same watch and strap at the moment. There are a couple of manuals online that can be found with a quick google search that seem to explain the bezel function, I look forward to using mine on the racecourse next summer. 

 

JJK

New member
I am wearing the same watch and strap at the moment. There are a couple of manuals online that can be found with a quick google search that seem to explain the bezel function, I look forward to using mine on the racecourse next summer. 
I used to race J/24's with one of these back in the 90's. IIRC, you set the bezel at 3 and 9 o'clock to be the headings for the start line. Then 12 o'clock is the wind direction for a true line (in the picture above this would be 0 degrees). Anything other than 12 o'clock represents the favored end of the line. 

 

See Level

Working to overcome my inner peace
You can also set your compass heading to 12oclock and you'll see your tack and gybe headings.

Not that you couldn't figure it out anyway B)

 
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