This is why we can't have nice things....

Gigantasy

Front Row Himbo
64
47
Oakland
Coast Guard Sector Virginia says a good Samaritan reported around 2 a.m. Monday that the sailing vessel Irish Tango was “sailing erratically and impeding oncoming traffic” in Thimble Shoal Channel, two miles east of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel. The good Samaritan also said the sailboat was crossing back and forth across the bow of an approaching container ship.
Sounds like Irish Tango was doing the Irish tango.
 

Talchotali

Capt. Marvel's Wise Friend
498
253
Vancouverium BC
What a news day ! Sailboat trafficking in rocket fuel !

U.S. Navy seizes 70 tons of Iranian missile fuel from a sailboat to Yemen


Courtesy The Associated Press
Published November 15, 2022 at 9:42 AM CST
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — The U.S. Navy said Tuesday it found 70 tons of a missile fuel component hidden among bags of fertilizer aboard a sailing dhow that bound to Yemen from Iran, the first-such seizure in that country's years-long war as a cease-fire there has broken down.
The Navy said the amount of ammonium perchlorate discovered could fuel more than a dozen medium-range ballistic missiles, the same weapons Yemen's Iranian-backed Houthi rebels have used to target both forces allied to the country's internationally recognized government and the Saudi-led coalition that supports them.
The apparent rearming effort comes as Iran has threatened Saudi Arabia, the United States and other nations over the monthslong protests calling for the overthrow the Islamic Republic's theocracy. Tehran blames foreign powers — rather than its own frustrated population — for fomenting the protests, which have seen at least 344 people killed and 15,820 people arrested amid a widening crackdown on dissent there.
The Houthis and Iran's mission to the United Nations did not respond to requests for comment.
"This type of shipment and just the massive volume of explosive material is a serious concern because it is destabilizing," Cmdr. Timothy Hawkins, a spokesman for Navy's Mideast-based 5th Fleet, told The Associated Press. "The unlawful transport of weapons from Iran to Yemen leads to instability and violence."
The U.S. Coast Guard ship USCGC John Scheuerman and guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans stopped a traditional wooden sailing vessel known as a dhow in the Gulf of Oman on Nov. 8, the Navy said. During a weeklong search, sailors discovered bags of ammonium perchlorate hidden inside of what initially appeared to be a shipment of 100 tons of urea.
Sailors inventory urea and ammonium perchlorate found on a dhow intercepted in the Gulf of Oman. The U.S. Navy says it found 70 tons of a missile fuel component hidden among bags of fertilizer aboard a ship bound to Yemen from Iran.
Kevin Frus - U.S. Navy Via AP
Sailors inventory urea and ammonium perchlorate found on a dhow intercepted in the Gulf of Oman. The U.S. Navy says it found 70 tons of a missile fuel component hidden among bags of fertilizer aboard a ship bound to Yemen from Iran.
Urea, a fertilizer, also can be used to manufacture explosives.
The dhow was so weighted down by the shipment that it posed a hazard to nearby shipping in the Gulf of Oman, a route that leads from the Strait of Hormuz, the narrow mouth of the Persian Gulf, out to the Indian Ocean. The Navy ended up sinking the ship with much of the material still on board due to the danger, Hawkins said.
The Sullivans handed over the four Yemeni crew members to the country's internationally recognized government on Tuesday.
Asked how the Navy knew to stop the ship, Hawkins only said the Navy knew through "multiple means" that the vessel carried the fuel and that it came from Iran bound for Yemen. He declined to elaborate.
"Given the fact it was on a route usually used to smuggle illicit weapons and drugs from Iran to Yemen really tells you what you need to know," Hawkins said. "It clearly wasn't intended for good."
The Houthis seized Yemen's capital, Sanaa, in September 2014 and forced the internationally recognized government into exile. A Saudi-led coalition armed with U.S. weaponry and intelligence entered the war on the side of Yemen's exiled government in March 2015. Years of inconclusive fighting has pushed the Arab world's poorest nation to the brink of famine.
A United Nations arms embargo has prohibited weapons transfers to the Houthis since 2014. Despite that, Iran long has been transferring rifles, rocket-propelled grenades, missiles and other weaponry to the Houthis via dhow shipments. Though Iran denies arming the Houthis, independent experts, Western nations and U.N. experts have traced components seized abroad detained vessels back to Iran.
A six-month cease-fire in Yemen's war, the longest of the conflict, expired in October despite diplomatic efforts to renew it. That's led to fears the war could again escalate. More than 150,000 people have been killed in Yemen during the fighting, including over 14,500 civilians.
There have been sporadic attacks since the cease-fire expired. In late October, a Houthi drone attack targeted a Greek cargo ship near the port city of Mukalla, causing no damage to the vessel.
Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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It seems these day if you want to see the world, join the U.S. Coast Guard. Between policing, international fishing compliance, shipping security and PR duties, smaller, more nimble CG ships are being deployed in many theatres.

Because the CG have been granted policing responsibilities, they provide a convenient political buffer from involving a traditional military resources (the Navy) in international quasi-civilian policing.

What a fun time to be in the Coast Guard. Visit exotic ports of call on a ship crewed by less than 50 fellow sailors on Uncle Sam's dime. And the're paying a $50K signup bonus.

(P.S. they need cooks really bad).
 
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kinardly

Super Anarchist
CG is the real deal. I tried to get my son to consider applying, even went so far as to call the recruiter and ask if I could bring him down to an interview. I was politely told if he wasn’t motivated to ask for himself and come down on his own, the recruiters wouldn’t talk to him. They only want the ones who want in from the get go. Good for them.
 

P_Wop

Super Anarchist
7,155
4,346
Bay Area, CA
I can't believe there are still people who don't label the corners of their sails.
We had a complete numbnuts foisted on us by the owner many years ago. He said he was a sailor, but.... In desperation we gave him a sharpie and asked him to mark the corners of a couple of new sails. You got it. 'Corner', 'Corner' and 'Corner.'

You couldn't make this shit up. We got him to add 'Top', 'Back' and 'Front' and that's how we did a couple of seasons.
 

Talchotali

Capt. Marvel's Wise Friend
498
253
Vancouverium BC

"...People have a right to make bad decisions..."

Fire chief says boaters who stay on boats in hurricane put first-responders at risk​


by Al Pefley
Monday, November 21st 2022 (Courtesy CBS 12)

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The couple's sailboat was pinned under a bridge and the winds were howling when Hurricane Nicole hit on Nov. 9, 2022. (St. Lucie County Fire District)
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The couple's sailboat was pinned under a bridge and the winds were howling when Hurricane Nicole hit on Nov. 9, 2022. (St. Lucie County Fire District)

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FORT PIERCE, Fla. (CBS12) — We're hearing for the first time a 911 call for help from a sailboat during Hurricane Nicole.

When Hurricane Nicole was pounding the Treasure Coast with fierce winds and heavy rain on the night of November 9, most people were on dry land in their homes or in hurricane shelters or maybe they evacuated and left the area. But one couple chose to ride out the hurricane on their sailboat.

CBS12 News reporter Al Pefley has the 911 call when a couple realized Hurricane Nicole was stronger than they expected. (WPEC)


Dispatcher: "911. Do you need police, fire or ambulance?"

Boater: "Uh, I'm not sure. I'm on my boat and it broke loose and I'm banging against the north bridge."

It was almost midnight and David Snow and his wife were in trouble.

With hurricane winds hammering their 52 foot sailboat, he called 911 for help.

The couple's sailboat was pinned under a bridge and the winds were howling when Hurricane Nicole hit on Nov. 9, 2022. (St. Lucie County Fire District)

Boater: "I've lost my mast. I'm under, partially under the bridge on the west end. As you can hear, I'm getting bounced around pretty good."

Dispatcher: "Are you able to get off the boat? Is there anywhere safely you can get off the boat?

Boater: "I don't know if I can safely get out of the boat right now."

The couple's sailboat was pinned under a bridge and the winds were howling.

The sailboat's mast was broken off.

Boater: "We're right underneath the structure of the bridge and it's banging pretty hard!”

Firefighters responded with a ladder truck, to try to lift the boaters to safety.

That didn't work, and the sailboat — with the couple still on board — broke loose was swept into the churning waters in the Indian River Lagoon.

Two members of the St. Lucie County Fire District went out in a 14 foot small aluminum boat and rescued the sailboaters. The rescue took about 2 hours.

"Really proud of 'em. They took the operation one step at a time," said Fire Chief Nate Spera, St. Lucie County Fire District.

When a mandatory evacuation order is issued for people who live in low-lying areas, or on barrier islands, the Fire Chief says that doesn't apply to people who live on their boats.

Video here:


5774e535-a499-4749-a1e2-3abb1bf83f7c-medium16x9_Couplerescuedfromboatduringhurricane.jpg

The couple's sailboat was pinned under a bridge and the winds were howling when Hurricane Nicole hit on Nov. 9, 2022. (St. Lucie County Fire District)


"We have no way really to force them off the craft or force them onto dry land. It puts us in a predicament every time there's a significant storm. There are a lot of liveaboards that stay on their units," Chief Spera said.

"When the people stay on their boats, does that put your first responders in jeopardy sometimes?" we asked.

"Yeah if we're having to respond out there. Absolutely," Chief Spera said.

"Do you think the legislature needs to look at that, then, that it would require boaters to get off their boats?" we asked.

"It's something to consider but the reality is, you know, people have the right to make bad decisions," he said.



4ac5415b-23e1-47e2-9719-25797c942ac8-medium16x9_Couplerescuedfromboatduringhurricane3.jpg

The couple's sailboat was pinned under a bridge and the winds were howling when Hurricane Nicole hit on Nov. 9, 2022. (St. Lucie County Fire District)


"What do you mean?" we asked.

"That's the type of thing where I don't know that you can legislate it," Chief Spera said.

He says in this particular case, the Coast Guard had no rescue boats available and elected not to respond to the situation.

Chief Spera says if firefighter-paramedics ever have to rescue boaters again in a hurricane, the St. Lucie Co. Fire District is in the process of getting a bigger boat — probably in 2024 — that will make it safer to carry out these kinds of perilous rescue operations.
 
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