Those pesky Orca's are back, and they seem to be learning...

tallyho

Member
217
87
Norway
They're baaack... a couple of things.. For one, I was surprised by the volume of "incidents" in 2021 alone. (map below) It seems these are becoming so common that they are not even newsworthy.

And secondly, from some friends doing a delivery to France who just lost their rudder on the 24th April. Their boat, and another got attacked in quick succession. The other boat was towed first, from the rescuers...

"...when they started to tow the other boat. The orcas were still around and 2 of them tried to bite over the rope – two times!. They got the rope in their mouths, but were not able to cut it, but they dived, and you could see the sailboat bow moving downwards..."  

Smart buggers. how long before this goes really bad?

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toddster

Super Anarchist
4,264
998
The Gorge
The data sheets don't appear to mention whether depth sounders were active or not.  Just idle speculation that might have something to do with irritating or attracting the beasts.

It did occur to me to think about considering one of these days installing an off switch for the depth sounder.  Right now it's just "instruments on/off."  In MFD-driven systems one can select "sonar on/off" or "ping on/off" from a menu.  

 

tallyho

Member
217
87
Norway
This part of the site is really Interesting, among other information it describes types of boats attacked and the damage different types of rudders suffer:

https://www.orcaiberica.org/characteristics-of-the-interacting-ships
They were towed by SAR into Barbate. From the feedback there were many more "incidents" (we are not allowed to call them attacks!) than reported on the website. If you are travelling through that area it seems almost more "when" then "if" you have an encounter.

 

Student_Driver

Super Anarchist
1,764
155
Darien
We did not see any in December on the passage from Gib to Las Palmas. Did not hear anything on the vhf either.  Did hear about a few missing boats though.  

 

Diarmuid

Super Anarchist
3,567
1,579
Laramie, WY, USA
Not smart enough to realise that yacht rudders aren't really edible though.
Nearly all of this aggro behavior (biting rudders, killing giant sharks, attacking blue whales) is the work of young male orcas, typically two or more of them. Mammalian bachelor groups are capable of damned near any rotten and violent behavior, as they vie for their places in the social hierarchy. Young males are far less concerned with impressing females than with impressing other males, b/c that's where the social traction comes. Stupid pointless stunts, or a bit of the old ultraviolence ... you'll see it at any skate park or shopping mall. Or milk bar.

1656879746179.png
 

MiddayGun

Super Anarchist
1,179
442
Yorkshire
Nearly all of this aggro behavior (biting rudders, killing giant sharks, attacking blue whales) is the work of young male orcas, typically two or more of them. Mammalian bachelor groups are capable of damned near any rotten and violent behavior, as they vie for their places in the social hierarchy. Young males are far less concerned with impressing females than with impressing other males, b/c that's where the social traction comes. Stupid pointless stunts, or a bit of the old ultraviolence ... you'll see it at any skate park or shopping mall. Or milk bar.

View attachment 526594

Must rewatch that film, its been years.
I hadn't realised it was for fun, I assumed they thought it was either some sort of potential prey or something along those lines.
 




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