Too much headsail up, sheet outboard ?

Soho

Member
419
7
Bermuda..
A while back we were caught with too much headsail up and no option to change down. Was using a #2 in 22-24 knots and needed the #3 which would normally go up @ 18 kts. From a driving perspective I tried to feather when I could to keep the boat upright etc. Jib was trimmed tight. Would another option have been to sheet it outboard a bit to open the slot and sailed to it that way. Boat is 83 vintage C/R @ 42 feet and 27000 #'s disp. Not inherently a stiff boat to start with. Really just interested in others experience with doing this with an overpowered jib up, is it an effective strategy under the circumstances.

 

ease hike trim

Super Anarchist
1,580
16
Not if you need to get to a windward mark. Better to scallop and not carry the top batten and make the change on the run.

 
First depower the main, twist it off. On the headsail I would move the lead aft, to flatten it and twist the top of the sail open and depower it. Move the windward side first, tack over and check it. I carried a big no. 2 jib (~135%) in 30+ kts, with a deep reefed main and a lot of twist. The traveler was all the way to leeward. I had a twin groove luff so changing wasn't hard (inside set and tack) but the water was really rough, big waves. We had already gone down from the big genoa and the boat was staying on its feet so I left it alone.

On my old IOR boat (Ranger 32), which had a HUGE headsail, I use the outboard lead (Baber hauler) on a reach to allow me to sheet out and prevent the sail from twisting and losing power.

 

Soho

Member
419
7
Bermuda..
Thank you for the input. I think we did move the lead back and the main was another matter entirely. My focus here was the impact of moving the jib lead outboard as a means to depower the sail. When reaching we immediately move to an outboard lead to close the leech as much as needed.

 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
6,750
1,123
San Diego
Lead aft is the simplest method of de-powering. It eases the top of the sail, so has big effect of heel. Pointing remains the same, just steer off lower telltales. You can lead aft until the top of sail flaps. Combined with feathering, twisting/luffing main top, should work for short windward leg.

 

Soho

Member
419
7
Bermuda..
Point taken, did not give it that much thought to be honest, but a glance at the Sailing Anarchy thread list indicates some pretty random thread titles so not sure it is a slam dunk to fit in there. Not sure it hurts anything to be here.... Maybe we need a Sailing Techniques Anarchy Forum...

 
R

Rob Zabukovec

Guest
Lead aft is the simplest method of de-powering. It eases the top of the sail, so has big effect of heel. Pointing remains the same, just steer off lower telltales. You can lead aft until the top of sail flaps. Combined with feathering, twisting/luffing main top, should work for short windward leg.
+1

And it allows you to feather the top of the mainsail more without detrimental back winding.

 

CCruiser

Super Anarchist
1,510
13
Thank you for the input. I think we did move the lead back and the main was another matter entirely. My focus here was the impact of moving the jib lead outboard as a means to depower the sail. When reaching we immediately move to an outboard lead to close the leech as much as needed.
Moving the lead outboard will not depower the headsail, as others have said to do that you need to bring the leads aft and sheet in to flatten the sail. If you can easily move the lead outboard and aft then do both. But only if you are going to drop the mainsail down. With the lead outboard you can let the main out farther, and as others have said twist off the top.

 
R

Rob Zabukovec

Guest
If moving the lead aft is insufficient, then moving it outboard as well is the next step. You won't point as high, but if the boat is overpowered and staggering, you are not pointing anyhow.

 

Soho

Member
419
7
Bermuda..
Thanks everyone, I got what I was hoping for from the on the water experience of my fellow Anarchists....

 




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