'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

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Emancipation festivities are going on here. We went to the parade yesterday afternoon and enjoyed the scene along with a good serving of 'Goat water soup' chased down by a Mount Gay tonic, 'easy on the tonic'. Having lived here for nearly 30 years there were plenty of familiar faces to greet, it's a family affair before darkness sets in and the volume really cranks up. My son Ryan is back on island having graduated with a first degree honours B.Eng in Renewable Energy Engineering (proud Dad) ...but he sure didn't know what the 'fungi' band were on about when they were shouting out 'when last you taste some salt fish??' I had to tell him because he is staying here for a while and it might come up.

Good progress on and off the boat. Chris has glassed in all the plywood hatch frames and even wrapped around the openings to seal the job for life. Belt and braces stuff. He also had the unpleasant task of grinding off all the sharps from the internal sponson ring frames he has tabbed in place. I joined him on Sunday and literally attacked the mast. Midweek I was chatting to Bob Phillips of Doyle Sails BVI. I have asked him before but decided to ask him again, we are all getting old, 'have you got any Antal HS24 track'. I was thinking he may have some 'keeper' sections that would work as gates. Incredibly he said 'I think I have 5x 3m sections in the loft, you are welcome to them'. Well, knock me down with a feather, that was too good to be true. As previously blogged, we have plenty of HS24 Antal carriages, a headboard, intermediates...we were just missing the track. Well, now we have it. Thank you Bob!
So, Sunday saw me out with some hardwood wedges and every flat blade screwdriver and chisel I own. Off with the old HS22 track. It was glued and screwed on with quadruple machine screws at high load points. None of the screws would come out, they turned out to be corroded into the track itself. I simply levered the lot off, it was actually remarkably easy. Flush with that success I focused on the gooseneck fitting that has to be re-located about 8" lower. That didn't put up much of a struggle either but there was a bit of minor laminate tearing going on that will need repair, mostly in the fitting, not the mast. Next up was cutting the mast down to size. I have already measured this 5 times but it was a while ago. Should I do it again? Nope, out with the 'Liberator' and the Makita with a 4.5" metal cutting disc. The cut was in the midst of the 'Spartite' collar. That stuff became wierdish candy floss when brutalized with the cutting disc. In the end I won and a 4' chunk of mast fell to the ground. Job done.

History?
Here's the third link from Frank and another dismasting during the 1984 Ostar.

1984 the Ostar observer single handed transatlantic,Triple Jack had to be renamed “Marsden” just for that race due to the sponsorship. The dismasting was caused by fatigue of the starboard s/s fitting connected to the mast rigging,,due I guess from the small whale I sailed over stopping the boat almost dead in the water pulling out the forward dagger board the speed was in the order of 8 to 9 knots…(The race of (Triple Jack) “marsden” was published in 1985 by Adlard coles ltd. And the book is called Rogue Waves.) The mast came down gently and was not damaged, lashed on deck and later reused.I will send you the transcript what happened after the dismasting .



https://rwyc.org/club-history/ostar-history/ostar-1984/

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Holiday over for Paul Jnr. and Steve! Aye, they are back after 2 months away from the project. Neither could believe quite how far things had progressed, with so many dreaded GRP jobs ticked off. Indeed, Paul Jnr had the pleasure of fitting what Leo of 'Tally Ho' fame would call 'the Whisky plank'. That was the closing panel adjacent to the port chainplate. Hey ho, no sooner was Triple Jack fully closed and for the first time in my memory 'leak free', it was time to cut large chunks out of the deck for hatches. What is the most important feature of any yacht in the Caribbean? Ventilation. We now have it in spades, 2 overhead hatches in the main salon with 2 smaller hatches ram feeding air into the salon pilot berths. Next up is a small hatch in the head and a brand new hatch over the fwd 'double work bench'. And yes, to allow all this air to escape aft (and more) will be 'Emma's window'. All hatches are very un-Cape Horn forward opening but they all have rotational symmetry of at least 1, so that can change if need be. Along with the air comes light, it is now airy and pleasant below decks.

The Antal track we scored turns out to be 26mm wide, not the HS24 I assumed. There's nothing quite like getting out a ruler now and then. It is old(er) Antal 50 stock. Fortunately all the cars we have are old Antal 50 too, so happy days. Full respect to Siebe Noordzy of Euro Marine Trading for spotting that. The mast is now on its back ready for old glue removal and new track fitting. We have decided to paint the mast and boom white. We have paint on the way courtesy of Alexseal and why have anything black in the hot sun?? Makes no sense!

We got the mainsail out for inspection after being rolled up in a loft for 5 years. Unfortunately there is some delamination at the tack and head. We see that as a good excuse to use the hell out of it before it dies. One side has a taffeta coating, wish we had asked for that both sides...Time melts for Snowman, laminated sails die all by themselves, it's nothing new.

History??
Anyone have the book 'Rouge Waves' by Nicole Swengley?

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Only seven Sundays to go until our intended launch to race the 'Virgin's Cup'.
What a thing!
On the bright side, with the paint having arrived today, all the essential pieces of the puzzle are in hand and paid for.
The topsides will be painted on September 21st with us hosting an 'Alexseal Seminar', all local painters and paint vendors will be invited.
After that it is 'just' deck paint, step the freshly painted mast, attach the freshly painted modified boom and sprinkle a few winches around the deck. Add to that a rudder or two and it's job done.
Who knows what the weather will serve up? We are a week away from the peak of hurricane season!
GFS models are quite bullish on developing tropical waves as they spill off the African coast...but so far, the good old Sahara dust is doing a number on them.
There's nothing like a deadline, that's all I can say for now.

Sunday saw plenty of paint come out. Heavily thinned down Sea Hawk epoxy barrier coat went into the two sponsons between the new bulkheads. That was only after Chris had spent days preparing with DA's and a grinder. The result is fantastic, inside the sponsons has always been a bit of dark, dank dungeon. 40 years worth of moisture seeping into the pores of the original unfinished laminates. Bleach, pine soap, grinder, vacuum and an acetone wipe before the paint went on. Now it is a useable space, happy days!

Steve got busy with the salon hatches. The frames were a bit bent so he sorted that. One of the small berth side hatches needed an epoxy fill to seat the frame, the other 3 salon hatches will all go in with sealant. The sponson and bow hatch frames are ready for fitting too, just 'Emma's Window' after that.

Since I cut the mast there has been a lively discussion on where the gooseneck should go. Last Sunday I placed it in my calculated spot and Steve casually remarked 'that looks a bit low'. OMG, I actually agreed with him and started doubting my/our measurements. To recap we set up a long track to mimic the boom level with the boat but clearing the top of the doghouse by 2". From that point we measured down to the deck. That was added to the luff of the main, the thickness of the boom and we came up with the cut point. I failed to modify that point to allow for the new thicker boom, silly me. Fortunately I had 12" to spare at the head to allow for the headboard car and stretch of the sail. To cut a long story short we appear to be in good shape and have come up with a cunning plan. Instead of epoxying the gooseneck in place according to the measurement above or Miles' navel or Belinda's breasts, (all have been considered) we will use small ratchet straps to hold the gooseneck against the mast. Then we use a threaded rod fixed at the lower vang fitting going up through the gooseneck. We hoist the sail to our full hoist and then crank the gooseneck down on the threaded rod until the perfect spot is found. Then we glue it in place. Crackerjack! What could possibly go wrong?

History?
With the paint arriving today it had to be Steve, with hair, mixing up a killer blend of 'Military Grey and Hospital Fire Retardant White'. This was sourced from 'Wood's Military Surplus' in Crediton, Devon. Excellent paint it was too, maybe a bit too dark, should have gone 1:2.
The year? 1989?

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I'm getting genuinely excited! The transformation has been epic.

Regarding nipple height, we've been measuring the size of our foal based on GF Ali's breasts - either she's sagging quickly or the foal is growing fast, both are alarming!
 
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Ha ha, so they are.
I too follow the progress of Bristol Boy Leo and his fellow expert wood butchers restoring the Tally Ho.
We started about the same time in 2017 but I think we are going to beat him by a country mile!
He seems to be very anti epoxy but I bet he's gobbed it in 'here and there' off camera!
 
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No doubt they're expert but you'll have the last laugh as your 'newfangled' plywood and glue screeches past them!
Well, as it happens Leo in his next video came up with 'epoxy tips' as he was sealing marine ply for the engine bay surrounds and battery shelves! Now remember that Triple Jack is an airex cored hull that has precious little marine ply but now sports plenty of epoxy repairs. I'm not a fan of most modern 'marine plywoods', they just do not hold up unless completely encased in epoxy laminates. Even then, just a small ingress through bolt holes or bare end grains leads to rot. Douglas fir exterior 'red' plywood holds up well 'in the wet', that is available locally now and then. If I'm doing a RIB transom or floor it is Coosa all the way. When you come across an old Swan floorboard from the 80's that stuff seems to be indestructible. I think the Dutch call it 'blackwood', the glue is dark, the laminates are fine and it lasts forever.

We got some hatches in and set up the rudders with their new 3.9mm walled shafts. With those new shafts glued in place there is no going back, we are not digging a 6' deep hole to check they fit. Trust the measurements and hope for the best. The new 430 profurl race furler is here, full respect to Isaac at Wickham's Cay Rigging for cutting us a great deal on that. Cheaper than buying the parts we needed for our various potential furlers we had in hand.

Today TS Earl tracked slowly just North of the BVI. Close enough for some hefty weather with gale force SW winds and heavy squalls. Just like a regular weekend in Devon! I spent an hour this morning cutting away two of the tents that were not up to the fight. Fortunately the system was heavily sheared and encountered dry Saharan air on it's way over the pond. Long live shear and dust! Mind you seeing Earl fight and blossom this weekend reminds us that we are in the peak of hurricane season. Tuesday will be the 5th anniversary of catastrophic Hurricane Irma.

Believe it or not the biggest decision over the next two weeks will be what to paint blue and what to paint white. The 'Alexseal' Triple Jack painting seminar is fixed for Wednesday September 21st. If it all goes well we will have a blue and white boat by the end of play. Deck paint will go on after that, but we will likely leave that until the bulk of fitting out is done and the mast is up. There's nothing like a boatyard to mess up your deck. I said goodbye to Chris yesterday, he's off to S.Africa to catch up with his family and tend his farm. His final project was to add some 'material' to the mid bilge to deal with the large puddle. Adding the saildrive base had stopped the run of the bilge reaching the lowest point just ahead of the engine. Filling that puddle was the only way to deal with it. He also epoxied in some plywood boards to cap off 3 sections in the main berth, one of them supporting the double berth base boards. Dare I say that it is ready for paint down there!

History will once again be a couple of Irma shots. One taken as we tied her up on the mooring 3 days before and one after.
Thanks Irma, what a good excuse for a big refit!

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Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,894
3,453
Well, as it happens Leo in his next video came up with 'epoxy tips' as he was sealing marine ply for the engine bay surrounds and battery shelves! Now remember that Triple Jack is an airex cored hull that has precious little marine ply but now sports plenty of epoxy repairs. I'm not a fan of most modern 'marine plywoods', they just do not hold up unless completely encased in epoxy laminates. Even then, just a small ingress through bolt holes or bare end grains leads to rot. Douglas fir exterior 'red' plywood holds up well 'in the wet', that is available locally now and then. If I'm doing a RIB transom or floor it is Coosa all the way. When you come across an old Swan floorboard from the 80's that stuff seems to be indestructible. I think the Dutch call it 'blackwood', the glue is dark, the laminates are fine and it lasts forever.

We got some hatches in and set up the rudders with their new 3.9mm walled shafts. With those new shafts glued in place there is no going back, we are not digging a 6' deep hole to check they fit. Trust the measurements and hope for the best. The new 430 profurl race furler is here, full respect to Isaac at Wickham's Cay Rigging for cutting us a great deal on that. Cheaper than buying the parts we needed for our various potential furlers we had in hand.

Today TS Earl tracked slowly just North of the BVI. Close enough for some hefty weather with gale force SW winds and heavy squalls. Just like a regular weekend in Devon! I spent an hour this morning cutting away two of the tents that were not up to the fight. Fortunately the system was heavily sheared and encountered dry Saharan air on it's way over the pond. Long live shear and dust! Mind you seeing Earl fight and blossom this weekend reminds us that we are in the peak of hurricane season. Tuesday will be the 5th anniversary of catastrophic Hurricane Irma.

Believe it or not the biggest decision over the next two weeks will be what to paint blue and what to paint white. The 'Alexseal' Triple Jack painting seminar is fixed for Wednesday September 21st. If it all goes well we will have a blue and white boat by the end of play. Deck paint will go on after that, but we will likely leave that until the bulk of fitting out is done and the mast is up. There's nothing like a boatyard to mess up your deck. I said goodbye to Chris yesterday, he's off to S.Africa to catch up with his family and tend his farm. His final project was to add some 'material' to the mid bilge to deal with the large puddle. Adding the saildrive base had stopped the run of the bilge reaching the lowest point just ahead of the engine. Filling that puddle was the only way to deal with it. He also epoxied in some plywood boards to cap off 3 sections in the main berth, one of them supporting the double berth base boards. Dare I say that it is ready for paint down there!

History will once again be a couple of Irma shots. One taken as we tied her up on the mooring 3 days before and one after.
Thanks Irma, what a good excuse for a big refit!

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That is an exceptional shot! Really puts into perspective the task you have undertaken. Good you you all.
 
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Good evening listeners, we have been slightly battered but are not fried to a crisp.
TS Fiona packed quite the punch, especially in locations looking at an Easterly fetch.
After Irma I suppose we have been 'case hardened', in reality Fiona was a merely a strong gale, something that happens most weekends back in Devon around school holiday time. We did have to strip the site of all canvas, to be honest it all needed attention anyhow. It's all back in place now and we are ready to plough on.
Unfortunately the Alexseal painting seminar for the 21st had to be cancelled. Fiona just caused too much disruption with ferries and airports shutting down and not enough prep time for us. On the bright side we can now paint when it suits us, this weekend looks good!

So, not much work to report on, the mast track is more than halfway fitted thanks to our good mate and TJ stalwart, Miles Fossey. He came up from STT for the weekend with his work clothes but without his glasses. Only joking, Mum's the word! The rudders are mostly extended, we could not resist one last grind into the stbd fwd beam fairing where a fill had taken place before all the tabbing had been done. Sadly but inevitably, it is still possible to mix up what you think is way too much low density filler, only to find it all finds a home around the roughly 10,000 cubic feet of Triple Jack!

History is for no special reason, an ancient shot of post launch cider drinking in the old Exmouth Docks. 'A bottle of Natch down the hatch'.
It all looks very different there now.

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As a avid follower and with all the rights that an Armchair Admiral of the good ship Internet Forum bestows, I hereby demand the re-instatement of the 70's Triple Jack artwork;

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Nothing less is acceptable to me.
 
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As a avid follower and with all the rights that an Armchair Admiral of the good ship Internet Forum bestows, I hereby demand the re-instatement of the 70's Triple Jack artwork;

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Nothing less is acceptable to me.
Sorry Ballistic, it's a fresh look.

Our sponsor Miles SP, the Managing Director of Nanny Cay Resort and Marina recons we will look like Ben Ainslie's Sail GP 50 with the blue, red and white. He has just written off around $81,000 in comped storage charges so he gets the vote.

If we went back to the 80's look it would be more like Benny Hill!
 
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A busy week.
It took 3 of us an entire day just to get the tarps back up. Then there was endless sanding, priming and sanding again. Remember the whole boat had been salt blasted by Fiona. Seeing a weather window to spray at the weekend I simply took the week off work off to get her ready.
The devil is in the detail eh? As the week went on various troublesome spots were shown the short stick. I'm not ashamed to say that some quality bondo came into play here and there. By Friday it was done and masking had started. That continued into Saturday with more help and the gun loaded at 2pm. 'Jomo' took the stage. He sprays 'day in day out'. I have done my fair share of refinishing but felt my role was orchestrating rather than being behind the gun. The weather was perfect, early showers had cleared away and the wind stayed light out of the East. So long as the fetch to Virgin Gorda stayed clear we would be in good shape. Trouble brews when it goes North and you can smell chickens at Nanny Cay. More often than not, along comes an unwelcome shower off the hills.

The 'Alexseal' Fisherman blue leapt out of the gun and the new look was revealed. It is not a common colour but it was an instant hit. A bit more character than 'Ethereal Blue' but not dark enough to overheat the cored hulls. I think it will look even better once it has the extensive logos planted all over it. Sunday saw more masking followed by the Alexseal 'Off White' that will be used for deck paint as well. Once again the weather behaved itself for the duration. Finally the hulls look finished, just the relatively easy task of deck painting coming up soon.

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HotCarNut

Member
57
16
Denver, CO
Seems amazing it’s been 5 years, but then the amount of work you all have done is unbelievable. Really curious to hear how she sails after all of the repairs!
 




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