Turnbuckle Cover Anarchy

Wright Way

Member
426
213
Not going to be able to do a photo for quiet a while but try picture this. 

Clew goes inside shroud but outside diagonal, fractional rig. I've sailed a few boats that have done it. Not sure what's so impossible about it?

Next time you crank the genoa hard around the shroud have a look at how much triangle fits inside it before you hit the spreader. 

Shroud base and track sort of have to be in right alignment but not that unusual I thought. 

 

Bull City

A fine fellow
7,058
2,668
North Carolina
All good points, but I did not want, and did not, touch the turnbuckles, the clevis pins or the cotter pins.


I don’t want to mess w the shrouds too much, but I might be able to put a slot in a nylon washer and slip it in position when the shroud is on the leeward side and unloaded.
Gabe, I am detecting a profound, and perhaps abnormal reluctance on your part to loosen the shrouds so that you can insert a full nylon washer around the clevis pin. This may be a phobia. I went through the same thing with my last boat. I really did not want to loosen the turn buckles because I would then have to tighten them, and when it came to the rig and tuning it, I was a lost sheep.

Just remember, we are here for you.  :p

 

Gabe_nyc

Member
270
22
Bayside
Gabe, I am detecting a profound, and perhaps abnormal reluctance on your part to loosen the shrouds so that you can insert a full nylon washer around the clevis pin. This may be a phobia. I went through the same thing with my last boat. I really did not want to loosen the turn buckles because I would then have to tighten them, and when it came to the rig and tuning it, I was a lost sheep.

Just remember, we are here for you.  :p
I appreciate the willingness to help. 

1 - this season had a very late season start

2 - I had a few other bigger projects before splashing

3 - I am a bit of COVID refugee and temporarily much further from the boat than previous

4 - if you look at the screws holding the plates to the deck you will see that they are somewhat mismatched and not 100% square.

————

So here is my decidedly non-phobic summing up of all relevant factors:

I’ve done my share of crawling in the bilge etc for this season (see some of my other threads). If I can avoid doing something until after haul-out, I will do so. 

I will not be doing too much sailing from now through the end of the season. Just like work/life balance is a thing, sail/work balance is a thing too :)-)

There is internal evidence of past leaks around the chainplates. They are dry right now, but the sloppy screw heads warn me that a proverbial can of worms may well  await there.

I am profoundly envious off all those who have never had “a small thing” turn into “a big thing” at a time and place that was ... ahem ... inopportune. Alas, I have not been as fortunate, and because of that, I have learned to (sometimes) exercise discretion before plunging along with minor-but-optional jobs.

 

xyzzy

Anarchist
833
34
4 - if you look at the screws holding the plates to the deck you will see that they are somewhat mismatched and not 100% square.
Not sure why that matters?  The deck plate just covers the hole by which the chainplates pass through the deck.  It has zero function as standing rigging.  You can take your shrouds off without touching those screws or the plates.  If the stress of having the shrouds loosened breaks some seal, then the stress of sailing would have long since done it already.

It's a 10 minute job to get the turnbuckle removed and put back on.  The only way it's going to stop you from sailing is if you discover something about the toggle or chainplate that you'll be glad you discovered at the dock and not while sailing.

 

El Borracho

Verified User
6,665
2,643
Pacific Rim
Not going to be able to do a photo for quiet a while but try picture this. 

Clew goes inside shroud but outside diagonal, fractional rig. I've sailed a few boats that have done it. Not sure what's so impossible about it?

Next time you crank the genoa hard around the shroud have a look at how much triangle fits inside it before you hit the spreader. 

Shroud base and track sort of have to be in right alignment but not that unusual I thought. 
Lowest spreader near the hounds? That is an odd rig... No way does a 135% genoa trim under a spreader on any production rig. Geometry.

”Pics or it didn’t happen.”

 

Gabe_nyc

Member
270
22
Bayside
If the stress of having the shrouds loosened breaks some seal, then the stress of sailing would have long since done it already.
That is a valid point. 

Nonetheless, I am pretty sure that my current solution will last at least until the end of the season, and I just do not see what there is to be gained at this point by buying all new unslotted washers and getting them installed in the limited time left.

Re my “reluctance” to mess with stuff, a couple of years ago I wanted to take off the deck-stepped mast on my previous boat (28-ft).

My yard does not have a crane so I made my own gin-pole to unstep / step the mast and it worked great even though I had found no instructions etc for making one.

Here is a picture of me and a few friends bringing it down (I am the good-looking one) :)-)

E44BDE41-368E-4C39-9490-BAE1AC98149C.png

 
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jbatstl

New member
No need to run the sheets inside the turnbuckles - that would be even more trouble.

Here is a shot down the length of the deck.

What I did the day first posted is to wrap 2 of those goofy covers horizontally and hold them in place with tie-wraps.

It worked but it was pretty silly-looking and that’s why I asked about a better solution from the hive mind.

View attachment 387582

View attachment 387583
I see white tape that looks like it probably covers the ends of the safety wire on these turnbuckles. What are you using for tape in this spot? I need to do this on my Helms. 

 

Gabe_nyc

Member
270
22
Bayside
I see white tape that looks like it probably covers the ends of the safety wire on these turnbuckles. What are you using for tape in this spot? I need to do this on my Helms. 
Sorry, that was there from the previous owner.

I don’t know what he used and I haven’t had to use any myself.

On the other hand, the rubbery tape that bonds to itself when you stretch it would work pretty well there.

 

Gouvernail

Lottsa people don’t know I’m famous
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The Genoa goes beyond the shrouds. The problem is the sheets catch when you tack. 
 

So.when you are on a starboard tack the port shrouds aren’t really doing anything but waiting to catch the sheet when you finally tack.

so... pull the port clevis pins and duct tape the shrouds  to the mast base.

When  you tack the sheet won't hang up

you are welcome 

 

jbatstl

New member
Sorry, that was there from the previous owner.

I don’t know what he used and I haven’t had to use any myself.

On the other hand, the rubbery tape that bonds to itself when you stretch it would work pretty well there.
Thanks. I should be able to find some good tape for this. 

 

jbatstl

New member
The Genoa goes beyond the shrouds. The problem is the sheets catch when you tack. 
 

So.when you are on a starboard tack the port shrouds aren’t really doing anything but waiting to catch the sheet when you finally tack.

so... pull the port clevis pins and duct tape the shrouds  to the mast base.

When  you tack the sheet won't hang up

you are welcome 
Thanks!

 

Gabe_nyc

Member
270
22
Bayside
So when you are on a starboard tack the port shrouds aren’t really doing anything but waiting to catch the sheet when you finally tack.

so... pull the port clevis pins and duct tape the shrouds  to the mast base.

When  you tack the sheet won't hang up

you are welcome 
My mast is keel-stepped. 

If I reinforce it with some of the miraculous duct tape you speak of, don’t you think I might be able to dispense with these bothersome shrouds altogether?

At that point, in order not to over-stress the duct tape, it might behoove me to preferentially sail only on days with following winds, but that’s pretty much every day in Long Island Sound, so no biggie :)-)

 
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Gouvernail

Lottsa people don’t know I’m famous
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Austin Texas
More seriously ... I really liked the plastic fender washers idea. 
in fact . 
Why  not take that a bit further.

and cheap! 
 

you could get one of those toll up plastic cutting boards and cut  a small piece. Drill a couple holes and stick the thing between the clevis pin heads and the forks. 
 

here is the finest piece of napkin mechanical drawing you may ever see!!! 

C57D9345-2417-4B81-8C3A-CA1FE86BA7F0.jpeg

 

Soho

Member
419
7
Bermuda..
Okay,  I had same sort of issue issue,  and just put in some washers on the inside of the pin to keep the head close,  worked pretty well  but still could get caught when the Gods were frowning on me or we REALLY needed a perfect tack.  However, I did also have a Plan B,  which while a little off the wall,  worked as well. Hear me out...  I made a piece of shock cord with clips on it that I attached to the shroud above the turnbuckle and stretched out to my toe rail, which has opening in it like yours,  the shock cord keeps the sheet from falling down there and causing hangup, I just take the shock off after racing.  Now,  yes, your 4 deck man might catch his foot on it and I think at time something else might catch that shock cord,  but the usual result is it just breaks and away you go.   Hey,  it worked at the time.  I don't do it anymore and I don't get that many catches, usually as I have a crew helping the sail around and it just works.    At some point I will fabricate something to fit in there to occupy the offending space.  The shock cord was just an idea and it worked pretty well.     

 

European Bloke

Super Anarchist
3,407
826
So as soon as you crack off a bit, unless you rerun the sheet, then the sail is chafing on the shroud?

 
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