Ukraine and Only Ukraine. If it isn't about Ukraine then fuck off

Ishmael

Super Antichrist
58,305
16,213
Fuctifino
Saw this yesterday - Wagner PMC to withdraw from Bakmut. Haven't seen any confirmation as yet though. (Did that work?)

<iframe width="885" height="498" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MKdhCb1cGWs" title="4 MINUTES AGO! Red Alert in the Kremlin! Wagner Group Exits Ukrainian Territory!" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share" allowfullscreen></iframe>
No, that didn't work.

 
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3to1

Super Anarchist
Lukashenko will have nightmares if anyone touches the red button. It won't be him, for sure.

On the other hand, it might take years before the transfer happens.
but why the sudden change in policy when the petro-mutts prided themselves on not stationing nuclear weapons outside russkie border?
this latest invasion (among other things) shows they're good for next-level atrocities. I can actually see these dirty cunts bypassing 'conventional reason' and hurling some nukes.

hopefully, I'm underestimating the mutts.
 
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Goodvibes

under the southern cross I stand ...
2,283
785
Are you referring to the first intervention, before we ran away? Or the second, before Trump ordered the withdrawal? Or the third that Biden quietly did? Somalia is still a mess.

I wonder why the US is so interested in Somalia?

"Moreover, Coastline hopes to discover multiple offshore oil fields, estimating that approximately 100,000 barrels of oil a day will flow from each discovered field. The U.S. player has invested over $50 million in Somalia, underlining its long-term commitment to developing the country’s offshore energy industry."
 

Rain Man

Super Anarchist
7,739
2,481
Wet coast.
but why the sudden change in policy when the petro-mutts prided themselves on not stationing nuclear weapons outside russkie border?
this latest invasion (among other things) shows they're good for next-level atrocities. I can actually see these dirty cunts bypassing 'conventional reason' and hurling some nukes.

hopefully, I'm underestimating the mutts.
The plan is to try to get Belarus to take the heat for flinging a couple tactical nukes at Kyiv, which Putin may do when he is losing badly.
 

LeoV

Super Anarchist
13,885
4,718
The Netherlands
With Russia bringing in old tanks to the front, I have seen video's of some very old trucks on trains. I wonder if Russia still has WWII Lend-Lease material in stock...and when will it show up in Ukraine...
 

Bristol-Cruiser

Super Anarchist
5,143
1,678
Great Lakes
Back to the China-Russia relationship for a bit. I have always thought that the possibility of China providing any meaningful aid to Russia was remote. China is definitely not in the charity business, it is all about what is best for #1. A book I have recently read reinforces my thoughts. It was just published and describes the relationship as of perhaps 18 months ago. Most people in the West do not know much about the Amur (it has different names upstream) but it is the tenth longest river in the world. Its valley has long been the place where the Russian and Chinese worlds meet.

If you think about it, eastern Siberia is a lot closer to Beijing than to Moscow so China's interests here are not at surprising. Hence Chinese influence has been strong in what has nominally been Russian territory. For the Russians, eastern Siberia was most useful as a place far away to send your political prisoners and to get furs and gold. In 1689, early in the Qing Dynasty when it was very strong and China was threatening to cut off Russia from the Pacific, the countries signed the Treaty of Nerchinsk which gave China control of the Amur valley and including lands further north. Understandably, a significant population of Chinese moved to their new territory. By the middle of the nineteenth century, the Qing Dynasty was a shadow of its former self and foreign countries moved in like vultures - think the two Opium Wars, foreign concessions in Shanghai and elsewhere, Hong Kong. The Russians were able to force the Treaty of Aigun on the Chinese in 1858. Most of the Chinese population stayed in the newly Russian territory and typically controlled the economy and were richer than their Russian neighbours. In 1902, a Cossack mob drove more than 13,000 Chinese, men, women, and children to and into the Amur River and told them to swim to China. Something like 150 people made it across the mighty river, the rest drowned. In 1937, Stalin decided that the remaining Chinese people in the region were Japanese agents (remember that Japan had invaded China by then). Thousands were killed or put into concentration camps. The Chinese have long memories and remember these terrible events. Not hard to imagine Xi wanting to return these lands to Chinese control. A much weakened Russia is good for China in many ways.

Today, Thurbron writes of the situation along the river. The Chinese cities next to the river are modern with tall buildings; the Russian towns on the other side are generally decrepit, run-down places with vodka-sodden Russians and busy Chinese traders running most of the businesses and restaurants. An aside, on our circumnavigation we found Chinese expats running stores and restaurants in every place we visited other than Pitcairn Island.



41vJzCkHDDL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
 

Lark

Supper Anarchist
10,041
2,053
Ohio
“China is definately not in the charity business.“ Russia is in the land acquisition business and unlikely to give up rights to major ports, as multiple other countries have. China is unlikely to trust Putin or his successor to honor such an agreement. It wouldn’t export weapons it may someday fight to retain control of those ports. That pretty much leaves the sale of oil and other resources. Extraction and transportation require labor, often from military age individuals.

China could export weapons by the trainload and gear up quickly. The US had to go to China for new industrial equipment when we decided to marginally increase production of artillery shells. We are fortunate Emperor Xi will only provide modest aid to Czar Putin.
 

hobie1616

Super Anarchist
5,965
2,769
West Maui

 

Lark

Supper Anarchist
10,041
2,053
Ohio

Interesting rabbit hole. The things were considered second rate by the 1970s, but produced up to 1981. This was partially for export, but likely means the relics are less old and may have had replacement engines. I’d love to see a procedure sheet on reactivating these, as well as the shortcuts taken by drunk Russian workers.

They have tons of steel armor (not composite or reactive). Some had lead lining, so the crew could live long enough to attack through nuclear barrages. Lack of electronics was obviously a plus against electromagnetic pulse. I doubt there’s much bread board or plastic in those things. They ought to be a scrappers dream, when left behind after the war.
 

Rain Man

Super Anarchist
7,739
2,481
Wet coast.
Russia seems to be going with the theory that if they can get enough weapons pointed in the right direction they can change the outcome of the war. Once again ignoring logistics, which is what really wins wars.
 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
63,952
2,202
Punta Gorda FL
In 1902, a Cossack mob drove more than 13,000 Chinese, men, women, and children to and into the Amur River and told them to swim to China. Something like 150 people made it across the mighty river, the rest drowned

This isn't exactly Ukraine-related, but I have already fucked off, so....

I looked and found what I think you're talking about, but the years and numbers don't quite match.

The Blagoveshchensk massacre of July 1900


In mid July 1900, while the Boxers in Beijing laid siege to the foreign embassies, Chinese troops from the small settlement of Sakhalien shelled the city of Blagoveshchensk located across the Amur River. Although subsequent reports confirmed that there were no casualties on the Russian side, in the panic following the incident the inhabitants of Blagoveshchensk turned against the Chinese population of the city, who at the time numbered 5-6,000 people. On July 16, Chinese residents were rounded up and taken down to the river in order to be transported across to the other side. When no boats were found, they were driven at bayonet point into the river and told to swim to the other side. Nearly all of these people drowned and only less than a hundred of them were able to reach the other bank. The number of those drowned in the Amur was never conclusively established — estimates ranged between 3-5,000. Although news of the tragic events did not appear in the Russian press at the time, later on they were extensively discussed both in Russia and abroad. While opinions differed as to who was responsible for this incident and to what degree, most sources agreed that the tragedy was triggered by the panic that followed the Chinese attack.

Because of the disturbances in China, most of the local troops had been mobilized and sent to the region of Harbin, leaving Blagoveshchensk practically unprotected. When the Chinese opened fire on Russian steamers on the Amur and forbade any further navigation on the river, the level of tension in the city reached its peak.

Pretty similar to how the USA reacted to Americans of Japanese ancestry after Pearl Harbor was attacked.
 


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