Ukraine

Fiji Bitter

I love Fiji Bitter
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In the wild.
Mostly gas, apparently.

For those blessed with Ignoray"s absence, the question was, by @Stingray

What do most German homes use for winter heating, electricity?

The Google answer took 10-30 seconds, depending on which answer you like:

What does Germany use for heating?

natural gas

Most customers switch to natural gas

In doing so, most of them opted for natural gas. Of Germany's 40.6 million homes, almost 575,000 more than in 2019 are currently heated with natural gas.

Note:
This is a free Q&A service provided by the Fijian Society for the Mentaly Handicapped
 
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Stingray~

Super Anarchist
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They need to take the railway bridge too, if they can. Hitting their supplies, especially ammo, is key since the less ammo being fired the safer everyone is.
 

Stingray~

Super Anarchist
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As I am sure you know well, it is the rail bridge that is the most strategically important, and unfortunately, the hardest to get a solid hit on (because of its structural design).

On a different topic - I thought everyone had put the idea of A10's to Ukr away, for being quite vulnerable to modern AA espically without complete air supremacy, and for logistical issues. But I have heard it again several places recently. I guess the thinking is that in order to make an effective counter-attack Ukr would greatly benefit from some close air support capability and people are searching around for a way to provide that - what do you think would be the most effective way (without starting ww3) to provide that capability (or do you not think it is a priority)?


I personally think the current (apparently) decision to withhold ATACMS is poorly reasoned and that they should be provided. I am usually in the 'wiser heads are somewhat conservative' camp, but the logic of this particular decision to withhold seems ill thought out. I would suggest essentially send them all (or at least half) the US has (which is not vast quantities but certainly enough to make a significant difference far into the Russia rear logistics) and the US military should use just a small part of their extremely huge military budget to get production started of the (already approved but not yet in production) replacement/improved generation going asap.

Ukr has shown excellent targeting using the shorter range version; and while I think we can trust they will not attack targets we forbid (like in Russia proper), I am not sure why we don't consider those possibly valid targets (eg command centers, rail switching points, and ammo dumps within range in Russia) for Ukr. I can imagine not wanting Ukr to hit targets in say Belarus, as that gets more complicated, although in US wars we have quite often 'covertly' (eg everyone on the ground knew we were doing but it was not acknowledged) it hit targets in 3rd party countries like that when we thought it useful. But Russia is the direct enemy invading country and military assets on their soil would seem to me to be perfectly valid targets. I would just want them to be given our best targeting intel (which they seem to be doing) and to be even more careful than the US military typically is to hit exclusively military targets.
Welcome to the club..

There have been arguments recently about how RU bombed the Port of Odessa, arguments about if what they hit were grain related or not and if that broke the agreement signed less than 24 hrs before.

That whole argument is complete BS. RU has no right to bomb anything in UKR, the idea that some targets are getting 'legitimized' is beyond crazy. Yes, UKR should be bombing RU targets no matter where they are. Yes, including in the Black Sea.

Am no military-equipment expert but a bunch of those A10 Warthogs are based near me, have seen them above sailing waters on occasion up in the San Juan Islands. They are killing machines, absolutely brutal. I hope that with air defense cover they get deployed soon for close range operations.
 
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Ex Machina

Super Anarchist
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This bugger is very close to the UKR border , wonder what they are monitoring ?

48CBD0D0-F3E3-491C-A0A0-213D3C2CEF9E.jpeg
 

dogwatch

Super Anarchist
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1,777
South Coast, UK
And in a change from posts from the Spectator, here is one from its left-wing counterpart.


Not much in it that anyone interested enough to read here would not already know, except I found this interesting.

In the US, which provides the overwhelming majority of military aid to Ukraine, the Pentagon has expressed concerns that its own arsenals of certain weapons are being depleted, which could affect America’s combat-readiness. A Rasmussen poll in early July found that 63 per cent of American voters thought Ukraine should keep fighting until Russia ended its invasion, but that was down nine points from April. Among Republicans – who are likely to regain control of Congress in the midterm elections in November – the figure was 60 per cent. Zelensky’s own ratings among the American public have also fallen: 67 per cent said they had a favourable impression of Zelensky, down from 79 per cent in April.
 

barfy

Super Anarchist
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Interesting...RU must have known it was coming. Even I did. just 3 or 4 precision strikes. How to prepare?

Edit: 3 or 4 and then you have the show GPS zeroed.
 

LeoV

Super Anarchist
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4,000
The Netherlands
Very interesting read;

With all promised and ordered military stuff coming to Ukraine in the coming years, including modern air planes, I think that Russia must feel it is now or never. And keeping enough stuff around for the future.
 

Mark_K

Super Anarchist
Hmmmm . . . . but as far as I know the Antonovsky Railway Bridge is still all fine (unhit) - right?

So, the supply line may have gotten a little narrower, but rail is where it is at for the Russians.
If they can accurately pelt that bridge they can accurately pelt a train on that side of the river. Can't hide it, can't load heavy equipment in a hurry either. It's likely the Russians will be forced to pull back to the southern side of the river at some point. Then what?
 

Stingray~

Super Anarchist
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PNW
Seems they'd want to leave an escape route via the (damaged, but still passable for light stuff) road bridge, for if UKR really are able to move close to Kherson. The more RU troops that retreat, the easier to take control. The railroad bridge is key to stopping RU supplies but taking it down even with HIMARS must be difficult, given how you'd have to hit such precise structural points from so far away.

Am hoping RU retreats in this eventuality because if not then Kherson could get demolished in the fight - and more importantly along with heavy civilian casualties.

Ending RU's push to create a land bridge to Crimea would represent a very big turning point.
 

Stingray~

Super Anarchist
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They have a ferry running, after their pontoon bridge attempt failed for unknown reasons. They use now a couple of pontoons as barges.
Nobody has damaged the dam, right? (yikes) And is the dam usable for transporting heavy things across the river?
 

enigmatically2

Super Anarchist
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Earth
The road across the dam is damaged, the dam is not.

And I have seen reports that the rail bridge is ok for light stuff and the Russians have put wood over the rails for that purpose. But either they are alternating that with rail (which seems unlikely) or its not strong enough for rail
 




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