USS Midway hit again?

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John W. Trimmer
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How to Avoid Huge Ships Paperback – March 1, 1993

by John W. Trimmer  (Author)



[SIZE=inherit]3.6 out of 5 stars[/SIZE]    1,414 customer reviews








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Great White

Super Anarchist
3,338
102
Bremerton, WA USA
I remember when the Midway was home ported in Yokusuka, Japan as the carrier for the 7th fleet, late '80s.  She sailed out for a cruise one time, and not far from Tokyo Bay, a steam line exploded in a small space.  As I recall at least a couple of sailors were killed and several injured.   I am pretty sure when she left Japan, she was retired, she was old even back then.  The USS Kitty Hawk replaced the Midway.
Yes, the Midway was decomisioned when she left Yokosuka and spent a number of years in the inactive fleet at Bremerton. Then moved to San Diego as a museum ship. The USS Independence replaced the Midway in Yokosuka and in the later 90,s the Kitty Hawk replaced the Indy. Kitty Hawk is still moored at Bremerton awaiting disposal.

 

Jackdaw

Super Anarchist
You were too slow....


Ah. Missed that. Well then to actually add some value I'll stay that I've chartered from Harbor recently and their seem to be a pretty good operation. The boat was in solid shape, and the skipper's briefing by the dock master was solid. Bet the Midway not is a no-fly zone now.

 

Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
19,718
5,338
Poland
Yes, the Midway was decomisioned when she left Yokosuka and spent a number of years in the inactive fleet at Bremerton. Then moved to San Diego as a museum ship. The USS Independence replaced the Midway in Yokosuka and in the later 90,s the Kitty Hawk replaced the Indy. Kitty Hawk is still moored at Bremerton awaiting disposal.
I must have been confused.  I remember when the Independence was at Yokosuka, I was at the nearby Camp Zama Army post.  I was actually on board the Indy just before a deployment.  I might have heard that the Kitty Hawk was in town in '92, when she was in the area.  I was gone from Japan by the time she was based there.

 

d'ranger

Super Anarchist
29,475
4,543
Rental fleets are madly installing new ACIS* systems currently.  Included with the equipment is a large book with pictures.

Aircraft Carrier Identification System

 
Hey!

Although you do have a point, Army ships are rarely involved in collisions...........

-DSK
LOL.  The Army has arguably as many ships as the Navy does, and a lot more small vessels, called "boats," which are not actually nukluar* powered, nukular* weaponed, or even submersible, unless the crew screws up and leaves out the drain plugs at the ramp.  

Oddly enough, a lot of the Army's ships are built for ramming things, mostly pushing bridge parts floating docks, driving pilings, moving dirt or for banging up onto shore to offload gear.  The Army also has more boats than pretty much anybody other than the South Georgia largemouth bass fishing fleet.  Lotta paradoxes within DoD...

The Navy wants us to save the Army's Navy...


*If Nukular is good enough a word for a lot of the sub guys I've known and for the nukular cannon cockers, and for some of the civilian powerplant guys, it's good enough for me. 

 
The pointy things on the bow are bridle catchers, or at least they were for the 200 or so cats and traps I did on the Midway.  Bridles were wire harnesses used to attach older style aircraft like A-4s and F-4s to the catapult.  The stern featured a 4 degree glideslope.

When I was on her in the late '80s, the patch of honor was one for being on board for her infamous 26 degree roll in a typhoon.  Especially notable since the Naval Architects had calculated her LPOS as 24 degrees.

We called her the USS Underway because she deployed so often.

 

socalrider

Super Anarchist
1,421
780
San Diego CA
The pointy things on the bow are bridle catchers, or at least they were for the 200 or so cats and traps I did on the Midway.  Bridles were wire harnesses used to attach older style aircraft like A-4s and F-4s to the catapult.  The stern featured a 4 degree glideslope.

When I was on her in the late '80s, the patch of honor was one for being on board for her infamous 26 degree roll in a typhoon.  Especially notable since the Naval Architects had calculated her LPOS as 24 degrees.

We called her the USS Underway because she deployed so often.
Thanks!  

Great to see her still destroying vessels after all these years!

 

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