USS Midway hit again?

THanks

I never heard about the roll incident. I was on tin cans, 26 degrees would not be remarkable

I was a BT and took several rate exams on carrier catapults (and elevators) but never worked on them. For the BT1 exam I went over to the one then in Mayport (IIRC the Sara) and went over them for most of a day including crawling over the water brake (the brake cylinder itself is not in there but there's some kind of piping for it that I don't recall too clearly) and fwd spring retainer for the retractor.... in other words, INSIDE that funny-shaped thing sticking out the front.

Bridle+Catcher+Closeup.jpg


Bu you can clearly see the bridle-caching function here!

( from http://thanlont.blogspot.com/2011/01/catapult-innovations.html )

We should probably hush up this kind of stuff since the Chinese are busy trying to figure out to run their own carrier and no doubt scouring the internet for hints!

FB- Doug (ex-BT1sw)
I guess we could just rename them Beneteau catchers and move on.

 

Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
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As part of my job, I traveled to Yokosuka for all three. Once for Midway in 1983 (?), several times for Indy and many for Kitty Hawk including a couple three month assignments as shipyard rep during availabilities. 
For an Army guy, I spent a bit at time at Yokosuka.  I had a few knee surgeries there and my daughter was born there.  I also was a friend of an enlisted psych tech there as I worked in mental health and we sent psych patients to the hospital there when necessary.   Yokota Air Base which also had a hospital was also nearby but we had a better relationship with the Navy folks.

Camp Zama was a pretty nice assignment.  Our aviation battalion used to fly medical patients to routine appointments at the hospital at Yokosuka if the weather was good.  It was a win-win, the rotor heads got in their required flight time and 20 minutes in a helicopter was better than 1-2 hours on a bus for the patients. Between that and occasionally flying on medevac flights, I got in a bit of flight time.  Mt. Fuji from one view, Tokyo from another and the Pacific ocean always.  Very cool.

 

ButtRumpus

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My wife and I went out for a sail Saturday evening to take advantage of a rare sunny day, and we came across poor Denyse on our way out. Once we figured out that none of the stays or shrouds looked damaged and the mast was raked back pretty far, we figured they hit something, but neither of us could believe another boat would've hit the Midway. I feel bad for the folks at Harbor because at least the dock crew I've met are cool, and their renters haven't caused me any problems (yet). It was a comically calm afternoon for that level of carnage. 

IMG_0203.JPG

 
apparently Iran went after a reaper in yemen but missed, so range of expensive US hardware at risk in that part of town...kind makes you ask what National interest is served in places like Yemen
Because the Iranians could shut down 30% plus of the world oil supply by blockading the Straits of Hormuz, and hamper 100% of the world's shipping if their proxy Shia militias get control of Yemen, and the Bab al Mandab Strait that controls entry and exit to the Southern end of the Suez Canal. 

You must be a front of the boat guy that doesn't look at maps much.   Related:  why isn't the U.S. and west harder on the Saudis, and why are there U.S., French, Chinese and Japanese military bases in Djibouti? 

 

KC375

Super Anarchist
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Because the Iranians could shut down 30% plus of the world oil supply by blockading the Straits of Hormuz, and hamper 100% of the world's shipping if their proxy Shia militias get control of Yemen, and the Bab al Mandab Strait that controls entry and exit to the Southern end of the Suez Canal. 

You must be a front of the boat guy that doesn't look at maps much.   Related:  why isn't the U.S. and west harder on the Saudis, and why are there U.S., French, Chinese and Japanese military bases in Djibouti? 
I’m reasonably familiar with geography having worked on and employed people on 4 continents.

Said mostly flippantly, US national interest might be best served by an Iranian disruption in the Straight of Hormuz. After all the US is now a net exporter of oil. Given North American production costs are on the high end an increase in oil prices offers more leverage to US energy interests than to Saudi interests.

As to the impact of Houthi control of the Bab al-Mandab Strait, yes that would be a significant effect on international shipping – that the US might or might not care about. How much of what goes through the Suez canal originates or ends up in the US? Still it would be disruptive to the world economy so that’s worth considering.

Since you a geographically astute genius from the after guard of the boat, I’m sure its clear to you that If the US is concerned about Yemen being populated by allies, then providing support to the Saudi massacre of civilians using hardware that leaves behind detritus marked “made in the USA” might not be the most strategic approach. That’s likely to be as effective as “operation Iraqi freedom”. Before the invasion Iraq was led by a really bad guy who was no particular friend of the US but certainly not of Iran. After the invasion the average Iraqi is probably worse off, blames the US for their circumstances, and Iraq has fallen under the influence of Iran...how’d that would out for you uncle Sam?

As for strategic actions, I’m sure you are familiar with Mossadegh and Kermit Roosevelt / Operation Ajax. Clear evidence of US belief in democracy – the overthrow of a democratically elected secular leader of Iran....a pretty straight line leads from that treachery to the anti US theocracy leading Iran. In wading into the complexity of Persian / Arab, Sunni / Shia rivalry, US actions put Iran on the opposite side from it. If you could go back to 1953 and pick a secularly led democratic Iran as an ally rather than a absolute Monarchy of Saudi Arabia...well you might do it differently if you had a do over. US intervention in the region has repeatedly got it wrong. That’s not to suggest that some American’s don’t get it, but they are often ignored. I knew someone in the State department who understood the dynamics in Iraq leading up to 2003. Because she wasn’t towing the party line from the Whitehouse she was fired (later picked up by the Pentagon to help with the mess post invasion). Sometimes just staying home is the wiser choice.

 
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spankoka

Super Anarchist
Camp Zama was a pretty nice assignment.  Our aviation battalion used to fly medical patients to routine appointments at the hospital at Yokosuka if the weather was good.  It was a win-win, the rotor heads got in their required flight time and 20 minutes in a helicopter was better than 1-2 hours on a bus for the patients. Between that and occasionally flying on medevac flights, I got in a bit of flight time.  Mt. Fuji from one view, Tokyo from another and the Pacific ocean always.  Very cool.
Camp Zama to Yokosuka by helicopter is really giving the patients the VIP treatment! I suppose the pilots needed to get their time in anyways. I will never forget a meeting I once attended in Ayase. The window panes were constantly rattling because of carrier aircraft doing touch and goes at Atsugi. 

 
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I’m reasonably familiar with geography having worked on and employed people on 4 continents.

Said mostly flippantly, US national interest might be best served by an Iranian disruption in the Straight of Hormuz. After all the US is now a net exporter of oil. Given North American production costs are on the high end an increase in oil prices offers more leverage to US energy interests than to Saudi interests.

As to the impact of Houthi control of the Bab al-Mandab Strait, yes that would be a significant effect on international shipping – that the US might or might not care about. How much of what goes through the Suez canal originates or ends up in the US? Still it would be disruptive to the world economy so that’s worth considering.

Since you a geographically astute genius from the after guard of the boat, I’m sure its clear to you that If the US is concerned about Yemen being populated by allies, then providing support to the Saudi massacre of civilians using hardware that leaves behind detritus marked “made in the USA” might not be the most strategic approach. That’s likely to be as effective as “operation Iraqi freedom”. Before the invasion Iraq was led by a really bad guy who was no particular friend of the US but certainly not of Iran. After the invasion the average Iraqi is probably worse off, blames the US for their circumstances, and Iraq has fallen under the influence of Iran...how’d that would out for you uncle Sam?

As for strategic actions, I’m sure you are familiar with Mossadegh and Kermit Roosevelt / Operation Ajax. Clear evidence of US belief in democracy – the overthrow of a democratically elected secular leader of Iran....a pretty straight line leads from that treachery to the anti US theocracy leading Iran. In wading into the complexity of Persian / Arab, Sunni / Shia rivalry, US actions put Iran on the opposite side from it. If you could go back to 1953 and pick a secularly led democratic Iran as an ally rather than a absolute Monarchy of Saudi Arabia...well you might do it differently if you had a do over. US intervention in the region has repeatedly got it wrong. That’s not to suggest that some American’s don’t get it, but they are often ignored. I knew someone in the State department who understood the dynamics in Iraq leading up to 2003. Because she wasn’t towing the party line from the Whitehouse she was fired (later picked up by the Pentagon to help with the mess post invasion). Sometimes just staying home is the wiser choice.
Yeah, I'm sure the world would be a lot better off without all the US interference and I'm also sure I don't have a clue on how to disengage without making it into a lot more treacherous environment, and I can't see how we'd be better off letting the Iranians take control of one side of the Strait of Hormuz and Bab al Mandab, and letting AQ in the Maghreb or some Somali warlord take control of the other side of Bab al Mandab.  Maybe the Germans could send their brigade and their new boat, if it's finally working, to secure the sea lane...

As for Iraq in 2003... I was there in '91 in the fighting and then for months afterwards dealing with refugees in Southern Iraq, working with torture victims, victims of mass casualty attacks by the secret police, and investigating some amazingly systematic and brutal large scale war crimes.  May have been the wrong war at the wrong time in 2003, but I have trouble condemning it outright.  Saw some evil shit.  That regime had to go. We were 15 years too late by 2003.  I have a healthy respect for stability and international norms but can't fetishize them after seeing that up close. 

YMMV.
 

 

KC375

Super Anarchist
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Yeah, I'm sure the world would be a lot better off without all the US interference and I'm also sure I don't have a clue on how to disengage without making it into a lot more treacherous environment, and I can't see how we'd be better off letting the Iranians take control of one side of the Strait of Hormuz and Bab al Mandab, and letting AQ in the Maghreb or some Somali warlord take control of the other side of Bab al Mandab.  Maybe the Germans could send their brigade and their new boat, if it's finally working, to secure the sea lane...

As for Iraq in 2003... I was there in '91 in the fighting and then for months afterwards dealing with refugees in Southern Iraq, working with torture victims, victims of mass casualty attacks by the secret police, and investigating some amazingly systematic and brutal large scale war crimes.  May have been the wrong war at the wrong time in 2003, but I have trouble condemning it outright.  Saw some evil shit.  That regime had to go. We were 15 years too late by 2003.  I have a healthy respect for stability and international norms but can't fetishize them after seeing that up close. 

YMMV.
 
I have a family member who has been involved with rule of law initiatives (including Afghanistan and several Balkan states. He’s certainly no fan of American adventurism but as he frequently reminds me: “You’d prefer Russia to have won the cold war?” Clearly not.

Maybe Obama was on to something with “Don’t do stupid”.

A lot to learn from two Georges:

George Bush senior – intervene only as much as you absolutely have to; and

George C Marshall – if you are going to get stuck in, make sure you win the peace – which means planning and executing on real nation building.

Getting stuck between the two Georges is a recipe for disaster...see Libya (that one’s really on the French and British not the Americans).

[SIZE=12pt][/SIZE]

Shall we leave it there and go back to sailing

 

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