Vendee Globe 2020

Laurent

Super Anarchist
2,304
1,969
Houston
Back to the race, really impressive move by Louis Burton on Bureau Vallée 2. By going further South, he kept better winds and reduced the miles and caught up quite a bit.

I also really like the style of Isabelle Joschke. When you listen to her onboard videos or interviews pre-start of the race, she comes as a very determined, yet very humble sailor. She knows she has never been in the South but she is facing the challenge in a very smart way. She knows she cannot compete on a physical brute force level (the lady is petite, weighing only 50 kg), and she knows she has to do things differently to compensate. For instance, she installed pedals on the bottom part of her grinder so she can use her legs for long continuous winching effort like raising a sail, seated like on a recumbent bike. She is not as well known as Sam Davies or as "extravert", but what a race so far... And she is nibbling at Sam's heels...

 

Applespider

New member
9
0
Kevin had 4 seconds to get off a sinking boat 500+ miles from shore with no backup other than his fellow competitors, spent an uncertain long cold night on his own in the Southern Ocean before, thank goodness, being rescued and the coverage outside the specialist media - zip.

Funny old world or perhaps as a sport we are not very good at telling our story  
I woke up this morning and my first action was to check as to whether KE had been rescued.  Then my alarm kicked in with a BBC news broadcast - I was astonished to hear a headline that a sailor had been rescued after his boat had sunk.  I was genuinely impressed that it was being covered.  Then the story came on - it wasn't KE, it was the guy in Florida who was rescued from his motorboat's bow which didn't really have quite the same drama.  

The Guardian did pick the KE story up at lunchtime - their first coverage of this VG. :blink:

 

Applespider

New member
9
0
astro said:
So why did he have to see somethng as low tech as a light?
I read it as the drift calculation put him back in the general vicinity.  The AIS signal would be on the plotter but at some point you need to get eyes on what you're looking for - and a light in an otherwise dark seascape would stand out to the human eye - and make it much easier to judge your manoeuvre to that spot.  I'm sure we've all had passages that are easier to do at night because lighthouses/buoyage can be easier to identify from a distance than in daylight .  I've had novice sailors really nervous about doing a practice MOB exercise in the dark - until they realise that with a light on it, it can be easier to spot BOB than a dull afternoon.

 

Rafael

Member
451
253
Alboran Sea
Back to the race, really impressive move by Louis Burton on Bureau Vallée 2. By going further South, he kept better winds and reduced the miles and caught up quite a bit.

I also really like the style of Isabelle Joschke. When you listen to her onboard videos or interviews pre-start of the race, she comes as a very determined, yet very humble sailor. She knows she has never been in the South but she is facing the challenge in a very smart way. She knows she cannot compete on a physical brute force level (the lady is petite, weighing only 50 kg), and she knows she has to do things differently to compensate. For instance, she installed pedals on the bottom part of her grinder so she can use her legs for long continuous winching effort like raising a sail, seated like on a recumbent bike. She is not as well known as Sam Davies or as "extravert", but what a race so far... And she is nibbling at Sam's heels...
He is focused in the southern lane caressing the IEZ, and with all the search&rescue operations in main peloton he has won quite a bit, yes kudos. Tomorrow he'll be facing a bigger sea state down there...

I do also like the way Joschke is sailing, very smart thinking indeed, legs will be allways stronger than arms... (not sure, I think it was Cammas that used that same bycicle winch mode in his Trimaran Groupama sometime ago...)

And Armel Tripon smokin'... with good sea state and pressure his blackPepper is making some very good mileage, very interesting to see the progress of that boat from now on... I bet all the boatbuilders are observing its evolution with great interest.

And what about Seguin!... man, no words to describe that sailor, maybe just three, Stainless Steel Cojones

 
Last edited by a moderator:
179
80
Mate I restricted EPIRB PLB as "not just for recovering my body!" to the Southern Ocean. Even in far more forgiving water temperatures it takes fuck all time for hypothermia to bite.

You sound like me having a EPIRB still available in a "foldaboat" NO TIME type incident fetishism. Mine are not a loaded structure but whales and containers trying to fuck me. 

Yours a good solution. Mine is aft mounted raft (easy access in a lost keel rollover) on a hydrostatic release with the second EPIRB packed inside raft and registered to vessels raft to give them an idea what I'm on if #1 a distress signal is a fail. The EPIRB PLB then a backup. 

The day they can get an approved EPIRB & AIS PLB in one small unit will be a great day. 
like this https://seaangel.at/index.php?route=common/page&id=2906

 

Laurent

Super Anarchist
2,304
1,969
Houston
AIS PLB has Sat GPS no different than EPIRB's.
Please explain to make sure I understand. So if I got it right:

- an EPIRB will get data from GPS satellites to calculate your position AND transmit that position to a series of "low altitude" satellites that will transmit that information to terrestrial stations, if you trigger your emergency button. And there is potential delay there, because there is time between when your EPIRB transmit Mayday signal with location data to the satellite, and when that information is transmitted back to the land station.

- an AIS PLB will connect to GPS satellites to calculate your position, but will transmit that information only on the AIS-B platform, i.e. VHF frequencies; and this is "visible" only in a very local area around you (at best, knowing that you are low on the water, and with big waves).

Is that correct?

 

jack_sparrow

Super Anarchist
37,393
5,094
Go

From the account of JLC it seems that he found Kevin because of the light on the raft.  It doesn't seem he ever picked up the AIS signal of the PLB (unless I missed it).
AIS PLB only the first contact first guided by position from HQ.

No AIS PLB final contact as Kevin zipped up in raft trying to sleep waiting for daylight and JLC.

So AIS PLB signal screened IF it was even turned on, him knowing that.

Turned off he would have turned it ON close to planned daylight recovery . That wasn't necessary as JLC came early in the dark, guided by the strobe.

 
Last edited by a moderator:

bucc5062

Super Anarchist
2,042
217
United States
If in one piece with keel no but snapped off probably a floater, but no longer skyward.
Kevin's comment (that I read here) was that he was not able to stay on the boat, as in swept off, from the stern which would indicate a boat going down.

Based on eye-witness reports, the bow turned 90 degrees within  x secs (lets say 4).  The main cabin was flooded almost within that time (barely got a message out before electronics died) and at or just past 2 minutes he was in the water then in a life raft.  

Y'all know so much, I get that, but reason would indicate that with that amount of volume flooded that quick, what little air pockets in the bow or stern would not have been enough to compensate for the amount of water "ingressed".  These boats are light, but not that light.  You consider a snapped keel, but there was nothing indicated from Kevin, nor did he say the rig fell.

You have a boat full of water with a mast and sail attached, foils attached, keel attached, but just snapped in half...If this thing is floating then it should be found, hauled out and inspected for why/how it snapped.  Why?  Because y'all keep talking about how this time the new foils are an "experiment" and if/when one fails...gather data.

Good guess it is like the Titanic, it found a watery grave deep in the (Atlantic?) ocean.   My 1 cent, but honestly Jack, you taught me not to speculate too much.

The boat is gone.  Kevin is not.  He and JLC are swigging wine (pure speculation, but a great image) as they await Kevin's removal and the race continues.

btw, Isabelle has eaten more into Sam's lead on her.  This sailor, if this is her first is doing amazing.  Coming round CoGH, there is still a tight race and that is very cool and fun.

 




Top