Vendee Globe 2020

ant1

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Isabelle on her retirement from the race, she's extremely sad of course...




 
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jimmyuk81

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17 minutes ago, ant1 said:

Isabelle on her retirement from the race, she's extremely sad of course...


So gutted for her. :(

Not good conditions for the keel to be swinging around loose, which seems to be the case. Guessing that’s got to create a lot more mechanical stress than if it’s locked into a fixed canted or central position...

Really hoping it doesn’t get any worse, especially the water ingress.

And I’m wondering where she’s headed tbh, getting further away from the South American coast all the time. Not much option in the current weather given the boat’s state, but what next? 

 

Varan

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And near the front, Dalin is happy...

“The wind went to bed with the sun, after a beautiful fast day yesterday. The sea was smoother and the angle was good: I finally expressed the potential of the boat, it was nice to finally make speeds more worthy of my boat. But the wind has died down this evening, we are somewhat under the influence of a small bubble which should move during the day as it shifts to the east. I have wind this morning which is not expected, it allows me to go to 11 knots at a good angle, which is good news.

Yannick has got away a bit again he has managed to extricate himself from this cell that is currently holding me, but I'm happy to have narrowed the gap so much. The rubber band should compress again, up to the cold front at Cabo Frio which is ahead for us. The passages in this cold front change from model to model, it is not easy to find the right route.

Tomorrow, I will encounter this cold front from Cabo Frio in the east-south-easterly. It will be the key moment, the last hurdle before the trade wind; it is all moving, there will be opportunities which open and close according to the models. Since you can't teleport from East to West, you have to make choices early enough, which makes it difficult.

It was nice to make these good averages on decent seas, it was a beautiful day. The weather was nice, it's good for morale to see the miles go by so quickly, the gaps are closing so quickly, it was great. There will be more, I hope. We will find some wind again next night, it will bring me closer to the front. There are still more to be done, which is good news. This front is going to redistribute the cards one way or another. Everyone will have their East / West positioning with which they will have to play until the doldrums. This is the last big strategic obstacle (until the doldrums, editor's note), then everyone will sail their line.”

 

Virgulino Ferreira

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https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/21607/the-vendee-globe-s-final-5-000-miles-are-set-to-be-a-cliffhanger

(...)

Isabelle Joschke trying to bring MACSF to safety with a keel swinging
Still fighting through big winds and seas with her keel swing Isabelle Joschke is attempting to extricate herself from the nasty low pressure which dealt a final blow to the temporary keel fix which had been set up to hold her keel central after her ram failed a week ago. She still had 30 knots today but sent a moving video, saying,

“I am bitterly disappointed, so sad not to be able to finish this course. But I am proud. Proud of sailing this far and proud of my race. Proud to have rounded the three capes. And to have shown that with MACSF we are all present and a force to be reckoned with. That’s something they can’t take away from us.” bravely stated The Franco-German skipper who had been lying 11th in the South Atlantic after actually sailing more than 21,000 miles on the water and with less than 5,700 miles to sail.

She explained, “This is not the easiest thing at the moment. I’m sailing in conditions that are fairly rough with quite heavy seas. There must be a swell of 5m and and between force 7-9 Beaufort. A bit like the conditions when I rounded Cape Horn. I spent the night bailing out the boat, as there is an ingress of water. I bailed and I pumped. I have managed to stem the flow of water. Now the most important thing is to get to a port and safety and to get myself to safety. I am extremely sad to have to retire. I think the Vendée Globe has been cruel to me.”

Technical Director of the MACSF team Alain Gautier recapped, “A few days ago, Isabelle had an issue with her hydraulic cylinder which is used to cant the keel from one side to the other and so when there is an issue, we had a cylinder which allowed us you to block the keel in the central axis. We set up a form of false cylinder that allows you to maintain the keel blocked in the central axis so you can continue sailing and this is what failed,”

(...)

 

Virgulino Ferreira

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https://isabellejoschke.com/isabelle-video-abandon-vendee-globe/

Isabelle expresses herself after her abandonment

Less than 24 hours after the announcement of her retirement, Isabelle comes back to the damage that forced her to give up the Vendée Globe. This Sunday, the keel of the IMOCA MACSF is hanging downwind and our skipper has no choice but to sail as flat as possible to preserve the boat. She is currently sailing under staysail alone in heavy seas with about 5 metres of swell and winds of 30 to 50 knots. She spent part of the night waterproofing her boat, the water ingress is now limited.
 
"I am extremely sad to have to give up. I think the Vendée Globe was hard on me, but I'm still proud. Proud of my course, proud of my race, proud to have passed the three capes and to have shown that with the MACSF we were there and that we could be counted on. And that won't be taken away from us".

Since the announcement of her retirement last night, Isabelle has been manoeuvring to quickly get out of the very big depression that has taken her keel actuator repair out of its hands. She is focused on finding manoeuvrable sailing conditions, while waiting to be able to choose a destination where she can bring her IMOCA safely back. For this, she can count on the assistance and expertise of Christian Dumard, meteorologist, the Race Direction and his technical team. This unit will accompany her and guide her from a distance to her new home port.

But before we know Isabelle's destination, we have to hold on, while waiting for the depression, which is still shaking up our solo sailor, to make its way eastwards for good...

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

 

littlechay

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So gutted for her. :(

And I’m wondering where she’s headed tbh, getting further away from the South American coast all the time. Not much option in the current weather given the boat’s state, but what next? 
I wonder where she will go to... From there Rio de Janeiro might be the easiest and safest option. Downwind to Cape Town is and option but would require more time in potentially big sea. Punta del Este will be quite tough from that location. 

 

TheDragon

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Interesting departure timing for Team HB, relative to the fleet's position.  They're close to the same latitude as the leaders.  They'll need to work some downwind angles, so I'm guessing they'll pass by Fernando de Noronha in some kind of "competitive but behind" position...  Like maybe in the gap between Tripon and the pack ahead of him...  Fully crewed, they may then be able to put on a show of blowing through the fleet.  I'm having trouble deciding if that would be good marketing or a dick move..  Either way, I guess my point is that I'm wondering if their departure timing relative to the fleet's position was random coincidence or not.

Or...  Maybe they'll be sailing fully in delivery mode and I'm totally wrong about this.
I'm surprised that the AT racing tracker does not show them, they should be able to superimpose on the VG tracker.

 

ant1

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A very nice article on Jean Le Cam was published on FranceInfo today...

https://www.francetvinfo.fr/sports/voile/vendee-globe/vendee-globe-jean-le-cam-le-tonton-flingueur-des-mers_4246611.html


Vendée Globe: Jean Le Cam, the "Tonton Flingueur" of the seas


Even if he will probably not be the first to cross the finish line at Sables-d'Olonne, the 61-year-old Breton sailor, dean of the fleet, is the undisputed star of the 2020-2021 edition of this solo sailing around the world.
"He's a true sailor at heart, for the fun and for the win. Come on Jean, King Jean, impressive record, you cross the oceans always carried by the wind." Here is the refrain of Yes We Cam , a song by Breton musician Alan Bleuzen composed four years ago, to the glory of Jean Le Cam, now hero of the Vendée Globe 2020 . "It didn't take me long to write it, there was a lot to say" , smiles this regular at Fest-Noz, who wanted to offer an ode to "King Jean". "A lot of sailors have theirs, it was amiss for the character," he says.

And that the Billboard be warned, a sequel is in preparation after the exceptional race of the eldest of the event. "It starts like this: 'Jean's fifth Vendée, the most beautiful, the greatest ..."  Return (without rhyme) on the career of the sailor who shines in this sailing race around the world alone , nonstop and unassisted.

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The skipper Jean Le Cam, glass of red in hand, celebrates his arrival in the Vendée Globe 2016, concluded in 6th place, on January 25, 2017, in Sables-d'Olonne (Vendée). (JEAN-SEBASTIEN EVRARD / AFP)

There are those who enter the world of sailing on tiptoes. And there is Jean Le Cam. Well known to sailors who train in the bay of Concarneau (Finistère), the kid landed on the Solitaire du Figaro in 1978, at the age of 19, when he was officially passing his baccalaureate for the third time, as a free candidate. Microscopic budget, boat loaned by a local shipyard three days before departure and preparation of this skiff with a group of friends who helped him without counting their hours ... "Nothing has changed" , smiles Gilles Le Baud, the winner at the time.


The young boy who shakes the coconut tree


The youngster brilliantly impressed everyone during the 2nd stage -  "three days and three nights without wind, we had hallucinations"  - and finishing 11th overall , ahead of a certain Mike Birch, fresh winner of the Route du Rhum , and other big names in the field.

And that year, Le Cam did not only prove his talent at the helm of his boat. His debut on Radio Cocotier also marked the sailors of the fleet. Radio Cocotier? Imagine late night public-access radio for young people transposed to VHF between figarists. "Someone speaks on the radio, often an experienced sailor like Eugène Riguidel, and he initiates a dialogue, describes Gilles Le Baud. It was not easy to find a place there, and when we poured out our misfortunes, we were embarrassed. " Not Jean "Difool" Le Cam. "He made his place instantly, with his offbeat tone. With a friend from La Trinité, they engaged in dialogues that made the whole fleet laugh."

If he voluntarily dodged the baccalaureate -  "I would have continued in a path that would not necessarily have suited me" , he justified himself to the website L'Etudiant years later - it was impossible to skip military service. The child of Port-la-Forêt (Finistère) did it it under the orders of legend Eric Tabarly, like the future elite of the hexagonal sailing. But passing Cape Horn with a crew does not have the same aura as doing it solo: "We pass Cape Horn, we go up to the left, and then there we are," he explains without false modesty to TV Vendée .

His racing science, developed on the family dinghy from an early age with the Desjoyaux family, particularly the eldest, Hubert, is not lost on the godfather of French sailing. "Jean was one of the two or three helmsmen to whom Tabarly entrusted the helm when the conditions were really bad" , underlines Serge Madec, another skipper who raced with "King Jean" in the years 1980-1990.


Respected and feared


Madec reunites with Le Cam on a record attempt to cross the Atlantic which has the sweet taste of sailing of yore. Before engineers, millimeter routing and the race for performance.


"We left New York Harbor completely drunk. Literally. We end up alongside a dock, I don't know how I end up on top of a building, and Jean wants me to jump into the net of the multihull. . But it was seven to eight meters high ... "

Serge Madec, skipper


Fortunately, the real starting point of the attempt, which will prove to be victorious, is only reached after a few hours of navigation. " We had totally sobbered up , smiles Serge Madec. I tried the same record again four years later, it already had nothing to do with it. It would have been out of the question to leave in this state."

Jean Le Cam is a certain idea of sailing, symbolized by his remarkable attitude during one of his victories on the Figaro, in 1996. Once he arrived, "he waited for the 40 sailors on the pontoon, each time with a cold beer in hand for each of them, whereas he could have gone to bed to recover , underlines Denis Horeau, former race director of the Vendée Globe. He is unanimously respected. " Somewhat feared too. According to legend, he generously chided Eric Tabarly, responsible for capsizing their trimaran in 1989 during a double-handed transatlantic race from Lorient to Saint-Barth. An anecdote that "King Jean" denied in a book published in 2011 .


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From left to right, Jean Le Cam, Patrick Morvan, Serge Madec and Marc Guillemot, record-breakers for the crossing of the Atlantic, off the island of Saint-Nicolas (Finistère), April 16, 1984. (LANGEVIN JACQUES / SYGMA)

Several of those who shared a boat with him say they had this Damocles sword above their heads. Like Yves Le Blévec, at the helm of Actual  during the Transat Jacques Vabre 2009, a few hours after the start. The moment the boat chose to do a forward somersault in the dismantled Channel. "The boat could have fallen on top of me ... Fortunately it didn't. But the only thought that crossed my mind is: 'When he [Jean Le Cam] will see me, I'm going to get a memorable chiding '. But in fact, not at all! "


"Here, take the helm"


Brought back to Cherbourg by a freighter, the two skippers debriefed their mishap. After a few drinks, Yves Le Blévec ends up confessing to Jean Le Cam what really scared him that evening. “With Jean, you have to have the manual, smiles the skipper Roland Jourdain, his friend of forty years. You could say that he is a little bear, gruff, a very shy side. A character with a big C. "

The legend of "King John" is on the move. Ask Kito de Pavant, spotted by the master in 2000 during a Transat AG2R, half for his performances as a rookie who dominated part of the race, a little also for the name of his boat, Soft-shelled turtles . "It made him laugh and we got his attention." Nevertheless, you have to go through the breton's armor.


"I was impressed, it was like meeting Tabarly in person. Jean Le Cam is a mountain of knowledge, an ocean racing star. He was already a standout."

Kito de Pavant, skipper


And apprenticeship à la Jean Le Cam is a pedagogy that can be described as ... particular. "You see the famous photo of Gilles Martin-Raget, during the Course des Phares in 2002 , where we see Loïck Peyron's Fuji in rough seas off Ouessant? It is exactly in these conditions that Jean said to me: 'Here, take the helm.' He had complete confidence in me. While I had much less in myself! And how could he be so serene, since it was the first time he let me helm? "


The man who ran on Krisprolls


The teammates follow one after another, anecdotes rain. "Every morning, you had to bring him his coffee with a hint of condensed milk at the bar , laughs Gildas Morvan, embarked with Jean Le Cam on the Jacques Vabre 2007. It happened to me to get yelled at when the coffee was too hot. As long as he had some, he could helm for hours. At the end of the transatlantic race, I perfectly mastered this art of lukewarm coffee. I must say that I do not remember having seen him drink water during the fifteen days of the race ... "


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The skipper Jean Le Cam, on the eve of the start of the Vendée Globe 2004, in Sables-d'Olonne (Vendée). (ALEXANDRE MARCHI / GAMMA-RAPHO)

For Bernard Stamm, his partner in the Barcelona World Race 2014, the memory is stronger.  "He needed bread and butter. Failing that, packs of Krisprolls. He hung them up high, in nets, so that they remained crisp without taking water. The cabin was full of them!"  Married to a restaurateur, Jean Le Cam is not the type to be satisfied with freeze-dried products, the daily bread of skippers for decades. Monsieur pan cooks, rain or shine, "because already, there is the smell that emerges, so it makes you want to eat" , he confided to France 3 Bretagne in 2012. Amused comment by Roland Jourdain, who has known him since his teenage years:"Jean is not a fitness junkie. I don't know how he relates to his nutritionist, but she probably has to make concessions."

The general consensus is that, Jean Le Cam speaks little. But when he opens it, it's not to stir air. Few can boast of having nailed Philippe de Villiers's mouth. The scene takes place at the Sables-d'Olonne cinema, the day before the start of the Vendée Globe 2008. The hall is packed to the brim, the skippers occupy the front rows, the journalists behind. The president of the General Council of Vendée crows at the microphone, estimating to several hundreds of thousands of people the crowd expected on the pontoon for the departure. Jean Le Cam speaks: "It's great, Philippe. But all the same, how are we going to make it to the pontoon on time tomorrow morning, with a bag, boots and family?" Taken aback, De Villiers turns to the two race directors present at his side on stage, who cannot hide their embarrassment. He requires them to provide a police escort for the Le Cams at 7 am at  their hotel.

The politician then launches: "Who wants one, too?" Twenty-nine fingers go up, and race director general Sophie Vercelletto leaves to spend her afternoon negotiating thirty escorts with the national police on the eve of the start, when she has other things to do. Denis Horeau, who recounts the scene in his book Mon Vendée Globe (ed. François Bourin, 2020) , comments: "It's always Jean who speaks up for others."


Not popular with sponsors ...


In recent years, Jean Le Cam's star had turned pale. Fault to a new generation of skippers, often engineers, often employees of their sponsors, who have a bit dated the lone skipper who leads his project from A to Z, with the sponsor only there to contribute to the pot. The rock becomes a dinosaur. "We were called the 'Tontons flingueurs', Jean, Mike Golding, and me," smiles Swiss skipper Dominique Wavre. Sailors in their fifties who had the same way of working. In addition, for Le Cam, an outspokenness that sent chills through the spines of more than one marketing director.


"He's not the most diplomatic. It's hard to imagine him at La Défense with a tie and shiny leather shoes doing the rounds of CAC 40 companies."

Dominique Wavre, skipper


In the last three editions of the Vendée Globe, Jean Le Cam has found the money and the boat - or both - in the last few weeks before the deadline. "Doing it on the limit, it looks like him. He is happy in his shipyard, to optimize his boat." We see it particularly this year when, with a 13 year old boat pampered with love, Jean Le Cam is in the fight for a podium, even after having made a hook to save Kevin Escoffier . "I don't really like it when we talk about 'old sea wolf' about him , pests Yves Le Blevec. It's not like he's still sailing with a sextant."

https://www.dailymotion.com/embed/video/xxbwlr

"The script is him. I'm just a thief. I prick his words, his emotions and draw a picture of them." The book compiling the drawings of 2016 had exceeded the expectations of its publisher. A second is on track for next spring. "Would it have worked with another skipper? Frankly, I don't know. But what I'm sure is that Jean has something more. The last time we had a meeting, at the Sables-d'Olonne, he arrived late because a guy had made the trip from Nancy to greet him. " The Le Camania has a bright future ahead of it.


 
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stief

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She is focused on finding manoeuvrable sailing conditions, while waiting to be able to choose a destination where she can bring her IMOCA safely back. For this, she can count on the assistance and expertise of Christian Dumard, meteorologist, the Race Direction and his technical team.
Her VG has indeed been cruel, but admire the way she handles it. Win indeed.

Wondered why she so quickly made a formal retirement, but see it was necessary in order to access the help of Dumard (and the RC).

They will certainly find her the safest way and help she needs.

(and thanks Virgulino for keeping us updated)

 

Virgulino Ferreira

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From left to right, Jean Le Cam, Patrick Morvan, Serge Madec and Marc Guillemot, record-breakers for the crossing of the Atlantic, off the island of Saint-Nicolas (Finistère), April 16, 1984. (LANGEVIN JACQUES / SYGMA)
Blimey, what happened to his face?! :lol:


 
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ctutmark

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I have no expertise in swing keels whatsoever, but couldn't there be a standby system installed that will lock the keel in a vertical position that is separate from the rams?
She had that and it also broke. Edit- Bebmoumoute just beat me to it

 
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jimmyuk81

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She has one, but it broke as well.
This surprised me, actually. I’m assuming the emergency keel brace is a solid metal component. Given it doesn’t have to move, with no fiddly hydraulics, it should be stronger and more reliable than the regular canting gear, shouldn’t it?

It seems rather unlikely to me that it just broke under regular sailing conditions, even in heavy weather.

So I’m wondering if the damage was in fact to something else - such as the mounting points in the hull. This could also explain the water ingress. And of course, as others have pointed out it’s possible the UFO collision also damaged the keel - perhaps exerting a load that the brace couldn’t handle.

Idle speculation, but will be interested to learn more, if we ever do...

 

Virgulino Ferreira

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I wonder where she will go to... From there Rio de Janeiro might be the easiest and safest option. Downwind to Cape Town is and option but would require more time in potentially big sea. Punta del Este will be quite tough from that location. 
Another option is Itajaí, half way between Rio de Janeiro and Rio de la Plata.  The Volvo Ocean Race stops there, as did the Transat Jacques-Vabre. Incidentally, on the 2015 TJV Isabelle's boat, then Quéguiner, won 3rd place there.

 

Your Mom

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Tripon closing the gap and likely to continue to do so for another couple days...  Should get close enough to at least make things interesting.

Conditions also look fast the next 4 days from Cape Horn to the leaders' current position...  Beyou isn't going to close the whole 2,000 nm gap, but he could make some significant gains if he eventually decides to step out of delivery mode.

 

nroose

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This surprised me, actually. I’m assuming the emergency keel brace is a solid metal component. Given it doesn’t have to move, with no fiddly hydraulics, it should be stronger and more reliable than the regular canting gear, shouldn’t it?

It seems rather unlikely to me that it just broke under regular sailing conditions, even in heavy weather.

So I’m wondering if the damage was in fact to something else - such as the mounting points in the hull. This could also explain the water ingress. And of course, as others have pointed out it’s possible the UFO collision also damaged the keel - perhaps exerting a load that the brace couldn’t handle.

Idle speculation, but will be interested to learn more, if we ever do...
Even a couple (or some even number) of high strength lines (probably would want them to be low modulus so that impact would not transmit all of the force instantly) would work? And be lighter?

 




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