Vendee Globe 2020

stief

Super Anarchist
8,118
2,440
Sask Canada
Good summary of JLC's 4th place in his 5th VG (unsigned, but sounds like Andi wrote this)

After his second place behind Vincent Riou in 2004-5 this is Le Cam’s second best result on the Vendée Globe and – ironically – improves on his sixth in the last edition on the same boat.
It is a remarkable achievement, reflecting a very smooth and accomplished route all the way around the world on his 2007 Farr design which originally won the 2008 race in the hands of Michel Desjoyeaux.

Le Cam’s race

The skipper had already said his goodbyes to his family when he went down alone to the pontoon on the day of the start, as if he was in a hurry to set sail, after spending so many months preparing the boat in a shed in Port-la-Forêt. He believed in his boat in spite of the fact that she was built in 2007 and very few people chose her as one of their favourites for the race.

And yet, on the day after the start, Yes We Cam! led the fleet. Jean would lead the race on nine occasions early in the race. Two competitors took therisk of entering the eye of the first big storm: Alex Thomson and Jean Le Cam. “Jean is getting close to me. He is incredible,” said the British sailor. The Breton found it all rather amusing. “There are people who think they can plan everything, come out with all sorts of ideas and talk rubbish... Saying things may make people laugh, but everyone falls silent, when you do things. The old man is ready to put up a fight.”      

Jean Le Cam’s voyage down the Atlantic was impressive, with the foilers apparently afraid of burning their wings if they got too close to danger. Ashore, he has always been popular in France, never one to pay attention to what is expected of him and ready to joke about what you are supposed to do to fit in with society. The French adore his spontaneity, while the ocean racing fraternity loves his trajectories. He has the image of a bragger or a wit, but those who follow such races closely know that he is always consistent in his sailing.

His progress would however be halted on a night in November off the coast of South Africa. Kevin Escoffier abandoned his boat and jumped into his life-raft, with Jean twenty miles away. He changed course, spotted the skipper of PRB, before once again losing sight of him. When he found him again, he managed to bring him aboard his boat. “God, you’re aboard. That was close,” said Jean, who must have thought about his own rescue in 2009 when he was helped by Vincent Riou. After a scary night, everyone wanted to pay homage to Jean, including the French president.

With Kevin at his side, they formed a comic duo, and appeared to be enjoying themselves during their week together. When it was time for Kevin to go aboard the Nivôse on a sunny Sunday morning, Jean was clearly moved. “Searching for someone, spending a week together and then finding myself alone again, is not that easy,” he admitted. 

He got back into the race and had to deal with warm fronts in the Indian Ocean and the Pacific, “where long surfing waves are just something you find in books.” He rounded Cape Horn (“it was not something to take for granted”) in 6m high waves and in 45-knots of wind. He would often find himself in a contest with other competitors, such as Damien Seguin, with whom he chatted, and Benjamin Dutreux, who “never eased off.” In early January, he said that it seemed that “there is no getting away from each other. Benjamin gets excited at times and gets ahead. Sometimes I call him up and tell him, what is this pact we have? It’s not working out. You are just doing what you want!” This was not Jean’s way of mocking, but rather his way of showing respect. He appreciated Benjamin’s achievement aboard a boat like his without foils.

His climb back up the Atlantic may well serve as an example to sailors learning their skills. Jean clearly enjoyed himself aboard his ‘Hubert’, the nickname given to the boat in memory of his friend, Hubert Desjoyeaux who founded the CDK yard. On the way back home, Jean explained he was in a good position, as he was “one of the chasers behind the pathfinders out in front.” The skipper kept pushing relentlessly and would remain close to the frontrunners, thanks to his expert knowledge of his boat. Reliability appeared to be worth more than flying at any cost.    
full write up at https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/22033/jean-le-cam-8th-across-the-line-but-corrects-to-provisional-4th-overall-on-yes-we-cam

 

Bebmoumoute

Anarchist
535
1,101
Southampton, UK
What did he say?
"C'est la place du con"

143792247_3658325024204407_8620650905551136675_o.jpg

 

Bebmoumoute

Anarchist
535
1,101
Southampton, UK
IMHO the scow bow, or at least a more flared bow, may come into fashion to avoid burying the bow in a following sea.  If they can keep the bow up, they can push harder.
As said many many times, the SCOW is currently banned. L'Occitanne is as much as you can achieve. We'll see whether Manuard gets more orders for the next VG. The design  (bow and foils) has raised a lot of interest among potential skippers, but unfortunately we haven't really had a chance to see what it would have been capable of among the leading pack.

 

Foiling Optimist

Super Anarchist
1,203
319
Vancouver BC.
For Maitre Coq, every gybe is a chicken gybe. 

This may be been mentioned before but Yannick's victory on a 2016 boat and the generally good results for several of the older boats is just great for IMOCA as it underlines that you can be competitive without spending eight million euros every time. I know rule changes will be a challenge but I can see the class just getting stronger. 

 

Miffy

Super Anarchist
3,834
1,700
That's not at all what I'm saying. I'm saying single-handed distance sailing is a grey area leaning heavily to being non-compliant to the Colregs and it's a massive liability to organizers and participants.

This collision could be precedent setting once lawyers are involved.
Let's not get carried away as if solosailors are the only ones colliding with fishing boats - contrary to popular misconceptions about colreg, it is fundamentally designed to facilitate underwriting of insurance and assignment of risk of loss and seeks to turn uninsurable risk to apportioned risk. It is no more a liability to Vendee Globe than VOR race directors and sponsors demanding one design boats with tired crews racing into Hong Kong in the dark of the night because fat ass chicom sponsors who have never been on a boat wanted the finish line to be near the shore (which they can't see anyway).

 

 

stief

Super Anarchist
8,118
2,440
Sask Canada
Somehow this older piece about JLC by his wife about new tech, old salts, and young chickens seems relevant just now  :D

“Jean was the first to ride hydrofoils, he knows them by heart, the foils. It is not the young people who will tell him that he is in the rear. He was the first to make very fast boats. He was Formula 40 champion, you had to see what it was. He has been a multihull, he knows what it is but he also knows what the sea is. He knows what the Indian Ocean is, four to five meters deep, mean seas, hard and brittle, he knows all that. Just as he knows when he can throw headlong into a low pressure system off the Iberian coast. At the start of the race, he was also surprised to see his young competitors getting around the obstacle. His wife continues: 

“The first depression they all avoided by saying 'oh, help mom', they say it themselves. Nobody was there except the two old Alex Thomson and Jean… At that moment he was stunned, he said "wait but guys, how are they going to do in the south? "
gtrans and snip from https://a4bsnbvhuot3dzt2slku24f6di--www-20minutes-fr.translate.goog/sport/2923499-20201204-vendee-globe-vieux-loup-mer-rigolard-competiteur-mille-visages-roi-jean-cam

 

stief

Super Anarchist
8,118
2,440
Sask Canada
From https://twitter.com/skol33

If you are first at the Horn, you have very good chances to win the whole thing.
Benoît is quite interesting (like all the #twailors). Do you happen to have the link to the FR article where he was featured? I can't find it just now, but it mentioned how he is an accountant who as a hobby compiles stats and ended up being consulted by some of the top journalists whenever they wanted to verify some facts.

(and funny pic of the Apivia troller :p )

 
Last edited by a moderator:




Top