Vendee Globe 2020

crashtack

Member
499
365
Open the weather routing screen first. After that you can add weather routing points with right mouse click. Or after opening the weather routing screen select an existing waypoint as weather routing start or finish. That latter is what I do.
My problem is that, when adding weather routing points with right mouse, the actual point isn't where the cursor is, it seems to be a random distance away. I guess I'll just make waypoints.

 

Schakel

Dayboat sailor
2 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

I'm with Shakel, AT is where he wants to be, for once not taking a flyer but sticking to the middle of the fleet.

While I'm here, just asking folks who quote things from videos to post the video so we don't have to hunt for it.

And so, here's Sam with her delightful smile, enjoy!


Flat seas in the Sam video.
This what those foilers are designed for isn't it?
These are the records they have to beat,

24 hour monohull
24 hour record set by skipper Ken Read (USA) and 20 crew on the 100-foot Comanche on July 10-11. While competing in the 2015 Transatlantic Race, Comanche covered a distance of 618.01 nm, averaging 25.75 knots.
https://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2015/07/20/new-monohull-24-hour-record-confirmed/

Imoca  record 24 hours:
World Sailing Speed Record Council has ratified a new 60-foot monohull 24 hour record set by Alex Thomson (GBR) on his IMOCA Hugo Boss. Thomson covered a distance of 539.71nm (22.49 knot avg) on July 19-20, 2018. Thomson beat his previous record set in 2017 of 536.81nm.
https://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2018/10/24/new-60-foot-monohull-24-hour-record/

Flat seas is one condition for a record.

 

Hitchhiker

Hoopy Frood
4,682
1,321
Saquo-Pilia Hensha
The next few days into the vicinity of Theta are going to be head down, nose pressed into the stem, on the rivet sailing. 

Vendee20.JPG

Vendeesum.JPG

 

mikkom

New member
31
14
I wonder if Cristopher Pratt will get chance with Charal. It would seem that Jeremie may have too much going on..

 

stief

Super Anarchist
8,118
2,441
Sask Canada
The next few days into the vicinity of Theta are going to be head down, nose pressed into the stem, on the rivet sailing. 
Reminds me of Mike Golding talking about the routing around Theta for both the real and virtual VG boats



edit. oops forgot to credit Sunol for the find here

 
Last edited by a moderator:

blunderfull

Super Anarchist
If going to sleep costs you 3 to 5 knots, this race in these foiling boats really is going to become a serious test of human endurance! More of a test than boat endurance!
As we see, AT looked a tad tired/stressed at the start.   How much more can he do to win this?

The Beasts must be fed the hearts of their skippers. 

 

Chasm

Super Anarchist
2,563
391
There is a short interview of Jeremy Beyou on the French side of the official web site, but I see no translation in English on the "other" side of the website, so here is my translation. Points in italic are my own addition/interpretation.

"First news from Jérémie Beyou (Charal) - joined in visio conference this morning...

[.....]
I have to admit I don't know if we can fix it. Quite frankly, I am waking up from 4 years of trying to win the Vendée Globe, and it is over. My dad is in the hospital; he had a stroke one week before the start. And I completely shunted that aside. Obviously, right now, all of that is blowing up in my face.

I am bringing back the boat. We will see after that. I do not know, I do not know about restarting..."
Who is his substitute skipper? Older or younger? Experienced or not?
If they can repair the boat there is the option for Jeremy to say f that and build a strong story around the struggles, how to cope and how to give someone else a go at your dream.

Or maybe there are good news about his father and Jeremy gets his head back into the game. Feeling down is to be expected while he limps back.

 

tDot

Member
233
127
BC
Question regarding tacking/jibing for the new foilers. 

In the older boat's, it was roughly an hour to tack/jibe, with all the work associated with moving the keel, sails, supplies, etc from one side to the other all in order to maximize righting moment.

Now in these foilers the mast is the weak link, they basically have too much righting moment, they apparently are often leaving the keel in the center position.   Does this mean they aren't having to physically move all of their sails/supplies, etc. On each and every tack/jibe?

(Though maybe they do in certain conditions when the want the foils retracted as much as possible)

 
I'll bet that the Three Musketeers (Apivia, Linked Out and PRB) have already jibed since the 1630 positions...to miss the island if nothing else...;-)  But more seriously because of the lift and to get more wind. Perhaps a bit later than them (however by now is likely) HB will take a hitch to port as well, also due to the lift and to get into more wind.  Obviously not too far though, only far enough to get enough wind to put the pedals down.  

But only guessing.


I think approaching Theta, the skippers probably feel the way I do approaching a busy roundabout.  Pick the right moment to join in the whirl; try to get into the appropriate lane to come out on the exit you want to take, and hope you don't misjudge and crash in the process.

 

Hitchhiker

Hoopy Frood
4,682
1,321
Saquo-Pilia Hensha
11 minutes ago, stief said:

Reminds me of Mike Golding talking about the routing around Theta for both the real and virtual VG boats


There is no way I would want to be on the east side of Theta and would do everything possible to get west, even if it means giving up some standings.  After all, as Mike points out, they are in it for the end game. 

A thought.  If Theta slows down north eastward progress, that could well throw a very large spanner into the works.

 

Sailbydate

Super Anarchist
11,849
3,419
Kohimarama
I think approaching Theta, the skippers probably feel the way I do approaching a busy roundabout.  Pick the right moment to join in the whirl; try to get into the appropriate lane to come out on the exit you want to take, and hope you don't misjudge and crash in the process.
Nice analogy. The round-about would be the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, right? ;-)

 

stief

Super Anarchist
8,118
2,441
Sask Canada
There is no way I would want to be on the east side of Theta and would do everything possible to get west, even if it means giving up some standings.  After all, as Mike points out, they are in it for the end game. 

A thought.  If Theta slows down north eastward progress, that could well throw a very large spanner into the works.
Agreed. And as Golding says at the end . . . 

absolutely. yeah well the one thing i've just mentioned here that if you're doing the virtual race, you go charging towards the front with not a care in the world because you're not on the boat, whereas these guys are actually on the boat so they're a bit more tentative in their approach. I mean i'd go charging straight for that hurricane center on the virtual but in real life i'd be heading west like crazy.

Oh good,  well i look forward to uh to seeing you in the in the eye of that hurricane then a couple of couple of days.
Yeah, i could be drinking coffee and going through the either hurricane.
Perfect good stuff all right catch you later
cheers

 

stief

Super Anarchist
8,118
2,441
Sask Canada
Question regarding tacking/jibing for the new foilers. 

In the older boat's, it was roughly an hour to tack/jibe, with all the work associated with moving the keel, sails, supplies, etc from one side to the other all in order to maximize righting moment.

Now in these foilers the mast is the weak link, they basically have too much righting moment, they apparently are often leaving the keel in the center position.   Does this mean they aren't having to physically move all of their sails/supplies, etc. On each and every tack/jibe?

(Though maybe they do in certain conditions when the want the foils retracted as much as possible)
Capey and Nick Bice discussed the "weak link" idea on the Bar-karate podcast recently (Cape says not a problem), and tacking/stacking  times were mentioned by Sam and Pip and others: 40 minutes is the number IIRC.

 

Wess

Super Anarchist
There is a short interview of Jeremy Beyou on the French side of the official web site, but I see no translation in English on the "other" side of the website, so here is my translation. Points in italic are my own addition/interpretation.

"First news from Jérémie Beyou (Charal) - joined in visio conference this morning...
There are worse things in the world when you look at everything happening around us. That being said, when you are a sportman, you live only through the lense of your objective. For the past 4 years, my goal has been to try to win the Vendée Globe. I am 100% in it. I do not see anything else outside this goal. When everything falls apart so abruptly, like this, it is very violent.  That is why it took me so long to turn around. Most likely, I should have turned around right away, instead of going through the front with the boat in that state. Obviously, it created other collateral damages, but I could not believe it. The wake up call has been hard on me.

Earlier in the day, when the wind was not too strong, I tore apart from deck a pulley for my staysail sheet (I do not know if he is talking about the first pulley the sheet goes through from the clew of the jib, or one completely aft on deck, before it comes back to a winch.). It blew up the bulkhead for the traveler (once again, I do not know if he is talking about the main sheet traveler, or the track to adjust the pull angle on the jib sheet). It has torn apart the deck on the starboard side. While I was down below to inspect the damage, I hit something and the rudder was kicked up, halfway up. There is a hole in the leading edge of the rudder and the trailing edge is broken.

And stronger winds were coming in; so it was either I turn around right now, or I continue. We decided with the team that the rudder was going to hold on through the front and I put together a makeshift repair for the jib sheet. The front passed through. It went superfast. I went from 45 knots on one tack to 45 knots on the opposite tack. I jibed, and I trimed in the runner, but with all the carbon fiber shrapnel on deck, it cut through the runner and I lost the runner. I also broke my mast head wind indicator a few hours prior. The runner, it was the straw that broke the camel's back. I had to bear off and turn around.

Right now, there are still heavy seas, but I am sailing downwind with about 15 knots of wind and the sea is from behind, so it is OK. On the other tack, port tack, the rudder starts to be seriously damaged, I cannot go very fast. I think my ETA is on the 14th, in the morning. After that I don't know... The rudder can be changed. The traveler and the bulkhead, I have to admit I don't know if we can fix it. Quite frankly, I am waking up from 4 years of trying to win the Vendée Globe, and it is over. My dad is in the hospital; he had a stroke one week before the start. And I completely shunted that aside. Obviously, right now, all of that is blowing up in my face.

I am bringing back the boat. We will see after that. I do not know, I do not know about restarting..."
Gutted for him.  Jesus, that sucks.

 


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