Vendee Globe 2024

Icedtea

Super Anarchist
No skipper, no sponsor, no boat 3 years from the start, seems like running a winning campaign is already out of question.

There are a couple of older boats in Soton/Hamble, but who knows if they are eligible/available.
Yep - I assume they can use their current boat, but she's for sale. Could be a young skipper older boat type arrangement like BP did with Clarisse last time round? 

 

GBH

Anarchist
525
104
mostly Oz
should think it was given away and then written off the books!   Bit of a disaster considering they had probably the best boat in the fleet the time before and then built a dog. And offering their design  expertise???  Don't think that will get much traction.

It would seem HB no longer involved and no surprise there. 

 

Icedtea

Super Anarchist
should think it was given away and then written off the books!   Bit of a disaster considering they had probably the best boat in the fleet the time before and then built a dog. And offering their design  expertise???  Don't think that will get much traction.

It would seem HB no longer involved and no surprise there. 
Is there any real confirmation the boat is a dog though? 

I amn't convinced it's quick, but a dog is a stretch surely 

 

Sailbydate

Super Anarchist
11,857
3,430
Kohimarama
Fastnet really showed it up as slow on all points against a pretty useful bunch of 60s.   Painfully slow.  DFL. 
HB looked very bloody ordinary at the start of the Fastnet. Mind you, so did, Charal, at that point. ;-)

583366735_ScreenShot2021-08-09at12_12_13PM.png.ab2e6047815ff38631950da208cd8735.png

 

r.finn

Super Anarchist
2,001
662
HB looked very bloody ordinary at the start of the Fastnet. Mind you, so did, Charal, at that point. ;-)

View attachment 470297
 I'm not sure you can tell much immediately after the start of a 600+ mile race, so not really clear about the point you're making.  However, interesting looking at the wake of these three boats, as Apivia stormed off to the southern corner of the course.

 

NZK

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Roaming
I had a chat recently with someone who was involved in the HB campaign. Apparently HB was heavily optimised for downwind foiling - it should have been able to stay on the foils at lower TWAs than Apivia, Charal etc so that in the south it could have maintained higher VMGs. If true this would go a decent way to explaining it's disappointing Fastnet performance, especially against Apivia which if anything appears to have been optimised the other way and is just smashing the other boats at higher wind angles. 

 

Icedtea

Super Anarchist
I had a chat recently with someone who was involved in the HB campaign. Apparently HB was heavily optimised for downwind foiling - it should have been able to stay on the foils at lower TWAs than Apivia, Charal etc so that in the south it could have maintained higher VMGs. If true this would go a decent way to explaining it's disappointing Fastnet performance, especially against Apivia which if anything appears to have been optimised the other way and is just smashing the other boats at higher wind angles. 
That makes sense - and he certainly showed speed at points in the VG. 

Overall I feel like there was a bit of an argument settling in the last Vendee where the boats that were quick in all conditions were the ones that both lasted the pace and were at the pointy end come the race back to France.

Looking forward to seeing whether the scows are as quick as Occitane looked next time round

 

ttc546

Member
I had a chat recently with someone who was involved in the HB campaign. Apparently HB was heavily optimised for downwind foiling - it should have been able to stay on the foils at lower TWAs than Apivia, Charal etc so that in the south it could have maintained higher VMGs. If true this would go a decent way to explaining it's disappointing Fastnet performance, especially against Apivia which if anything appears to have been optimised the other way and is just smashing the other boats at higher wind angles. 
I am surprised there is any discussion on this. It is well known and discussed on this forum that HB was optimised for Vendee downhill conditions. So why are people surprised when it does "short" mixed uphill/downhill and is behind the others. The Fastnet had a very strong uphill first half. HB was built for one thing only - and sadly we never got to see the full monty. Yes, you could call it a one-trick pony - but that was the whole point wasnt it?  Maybe Alan can deal with the reliability issues and get to know it better and turn the turbo on. Maybe modified foils would help too and a re-shaped bow (more scow like) ?.

 
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NZK

Anarchist
922
678
Roaming
I am surprised there is any discussion on this. It is well known and discussed on this forum that HB was optimised for Vendee downhill conditions. So why are people surprised when it does "short" mixed uphill/downhill and is behind the others. The Fastnet had a very strong uphill first half. HB was built for one thing only - and sadly we never got to see the full monty. Yes, you could call it a one-trick pony - but that was the whole point wasnt it?  
Agreed but I'm not sure if the degree to which it was optimised for downwind foiling was, or still is, understood. Boats such a Occitane/BV with it's scow bow had more obvious features that clarified their design focus but HB seemingly relied more on foil shape which perhaps wasn't as easy to identify.

 

GBH

Anarchist
525
104
mostly Oz
I had a chat recently with someone who was involved in the HB campaign. Apparently HB was heavily optimised for downwind foiling - it should have been able to stay on the foils at lower TWAs than Apivia, Charal etc so that in the south it could have maintained higher VMGs. If true this would go a decent way to explaining it's disappointing Fastnet performance, especially against Apivia which if anything appears to have been optimised the other way and is just smashing the other boats at higher wind angles. 
That's not a very smart design direction as the race around the bottom is dictated by weather fronts and the ice gates.  So if you look back at how that panned out last time around, you can't jump a weather system and so the winning game is to get to the South one system ahead of the next guy.  Assuming no FUs and breakages then they'll never get you.

Race down the Atlantic is the key leg, and you you don't want a one trick pony for that.  Nobody ever accused AT of being brain of Britain but some faulty logic at play there.   He should have kept the previous boat, way better all rounder.

 

Trocola

Member
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76
It might be a good idea to remember before commenting, that HB was first down the Atlantic until he broke the bow structure.

 

GBH

Anarchist
525
104
mostly Oz
It might be a good idea to remember before commenting, that HB was first down the Atlantic until he broke the bow structure.
Indeed, and thats typical of AT and his approach - all the others were throttled back to protect their boats and themselves and playing the long game, but not him.  Still no idea after all these years.

 

huey 2

Super Anarchist
3,427
1,653
syd

Tip and Shaft Update

VENDÉE GLOBE: AN UPDATE ON QUALIFICATION AND SELECTION

Second of the five solo qualifying races for the Vendée Globe, the Route du Rhum-Destination Guadeloupe was an opportunity for many sailors to take an important step towards qualification. Where are the candidates for the round the world with regard to this important formality and the race for miles ? Which boats are still available ? Tip & Shaft takes stock.

They were 38 Imoca at the start of the twelfth edition of the Route du Rhum - a record -; 34 crossed the finish line in Pointe-à-Pitre and for the vast majority of them, this is almost synonymous with qualifying for the 2024 Vendée Globe. The notice of race, unveiled just over a year ago, requires candidates to take the start of at least two solo races on their Vendée Globe boat - "one before the end of 2023 AND one in 2024". But also to finish classified by at least one of these two races, in a time not exceeding that of the winner increased by 50% (for example, if the first takes 10 days, it must finish in less than 15 days).

The five races in question are the Vendée Arctique, contested last June, the Route du Rhum-Destination Guadeloupe, Retour à la Base (return race of the Transat Jacques Vabre in a year), the Transat CIC and the New York Vendée in May and June 2024. This means that sailors who have completed this year's Arctic Vendée or Route du Rhum on time and on their Vendée Globe boat only have to start the Transat CIC or the New York Vendée in 2024, without having to finish, to be qualified.

There are now 31 sailors in this case. 14 of them completed the Arctic Vendée on time : Benjamin Ferré, Louis Burton, Guirec Soudée, Alan Roura, Louis Duc, Damien Seguin, Benjamin Dutreux, Giancarlo Pedote, Pip Hare, Sébastien Marsset, Antoine Cornic, Romain Attanasio, Conrad Colman and Kojiro Shiraishi, 17 did the same on the Route du Rhum : Jérémie Beyou, Kevin Escoffier, Maxime Sorel, Paul Meilhat, Justine Mettraux, Isabelle Joschke, Tanguy Le Turquais, James Harayda, Arnaud Boissières, Yannick Bestaven, Nicolas Troussel, Boris Herrmann, Szalbocs Weöres, Sam Davies, Jingkun Xu, Manu Cousin, Ollie Heer.
Almost more
used boats on the market

Of the 34 sailors who managed to cross the finish line in Pointe-à-Pitre, 6 could not use it as a qualifying race. The first two, Charlie Dalin and Thomas Ruyant, as well as Eric Bellion, because they were not sailing in their Imoca for the next Vendée Globe – they are expecting a new boat in the first half of 2023. François Guiffant because his boat, Kattan, is not eligible for the Vendée Globe (because it was built before the 2004 Vendée Globe). But also Rodolphe Sepho and Nicolas Rouger, whose race times exceed those of the winner Thomas Ruyant (11 days 17 hours 36 minutes) increased by 50%.

As for Fabrice Amedeo, who had finished the Vendée Arctic on time, he had the misfortune to lose Nexans-Art et Fenêtres in a fire during the Rhum, forcing him to start his qualification process from scratch. "I will have to requalify on my next boat, we are working a lot to find one," explains the one who is reassured by noting that his partners continue to support him despite the loss of his Imoca - which was insured - and that he is well placed in the race for miles (see below).

The options ? They are limited : according to our information, only Rodolphe Sepho's 2007 Owen Clarke plan (which we have not been able to reach) remains for sale, as well as the former Arkéa Paprec, with whom Sébastien Simon participated in the last Vendée Globe. "It is still on sale, we have done a complete refit, the paint has been removed, it is ready to sail in two weeks," confirms Romain Ménard, who leads the Paprec Arkéa Sailing Team.
Another six or seven
new boats expected
The current LinkedOut
of Thomas Ruyant already has its skipper, announced soon, for a project that will be hosted by the TR Racing team: "Advens 1 will be at the start of the next Vendée Globe, it is neither rented nor sold", comments Thomas Gavériaux, CEO of TR Racing. Hubert, Jean Le Cam's boat, with which Eric Bellion raced this season, "is being acquired" by Violette Dorange's team, according to his father Arnaud, contacted by Tip & Shaft. Uncertainty remains on Malama, the Verdier plan of 11th Hour Racing Team launched in August 2021. "No decision has been made about the team's or boat's plans after The Ocean Race," the American team said.

If he finds his happiness, Fabrice Amedeo will have to, to qualify, at least align himself with Return to the Base in a year, even if he does not finish it – he will then have a second chance on the Transat CIC and / or the New York Vendée. This will also be the case for all those who have not yet taken the start of a qualifying race aboard their boat of the Vendée Globe, especially those who are still waiting for their new Imoca. Namely Thomas Ruyant, Charlie Dalin, Yoann Richomme, Eric Bellion, Jean Le Cam and the future owner of the third Manuard plan built at Black Pepper (after the current Bureau Vallée and Initiatives Cœur), expected next summer. "On started construction last summer, starting by modifying the mold with a new hull geometry" , confirms the boss of the site, Michel de Franssu, who does not wish to reveal the identity of the buyer.

For his part, Jörg Riechers says that his construction project, financed by Alva Yachts, is still relevant : "It has been delayed, but it should start in February at Persico after Eric Bellion's boat, it will be a commando operation." What will the German do if his boat is not ready to take the start of Return to Base in November 2023, which would prevent him from claiming qualification ? He does not rule out the idea of requesting a waiver of the Notice of Race.
7 sailors are no longer
concerned by the selection

A mandatory formality to take the start of the Vendée Globe, qualification will not necessarily guarantee participation for all. Because if the number of candidates exceeds 40, the deadline for entries set by the organizer for the 2024 edition - applications must be submitted before October 2, 2023 -, the SAEM Vendée will have to decide between them taking into account the number of miles covered on the twelve races of the Imoca Globe Series identified, from the Transat Jacques Vabre 2021 to the New York Vendée 2024.

A selection that will not concern, according to the notice of race, "The wild card left to the discretion of the organizing authority" - that many see promised to Clarisse Crémer - and "The first thirteen new boats to start a qualifying race". To date, Jérémie Beyou, Kevin Escoffier, Maxime Sorel, Paul Meilhat, Yannick Bestaven, Boris Herrmann and Sam Davies, who took the start of the Route du Rhum aboard boats all launched this year, are no longer concerned by this race to the thousands. There are still six places to take to escape selection for a total of fifteen new boats (including Malama and that of Jörg Riechers).

And therefore 26 tickets to be allocated via the selection by the number of miles. The day after the Route du Rhum, the Imoca class has updated the table of miles covered, they are a number to be serene on this subject, including Giancarlo Pedote, Isabelle Joschke and Manu Cousin, who have participated so far in all the races selected. Some have more reason to worry, like Louis Burton, currently 29th, Kojiro Shiraishi, 47th or Clarisse Crémer, who, having not yet scored a single mile, does not appear in the IMOCA table.

However, for this selection rule to be applied, it will indeed be necessary to count more candidates than 40, which, to date, is not certain, several seafarers have not yet completed their budget. "Today, they are only three to have done every mileage after a year, it means that there have been adventures and that it is not that linear"notes the president of the IMOCA class, Antoine Mermod. Who, when asked how many boats he sees departing on November 10, 2024, answers : "I don't think we will be 45, not 35 either, between 38 and 42 seems like a good number to me."
 




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