Wetsuit Recommendation

I have now tried the new wetsuits (long johns) and tops from Lennon (positively reviewed in Yachts & Yachting around a year ago), and I have to say they are pretty amazing. Both the spring/fall version (2 mm) and the winter version (3-4mm) are remarkably warm. I recently wore the spring/fall long john with a top from a different company, and found that while the top was soaked with spray, the wetsuit just beaded up and stayed dry. With the addition of their top, I expect to be wearing this through most if not all of the New York winter.

Unlike divers and surfers, even on the worst days we spend much more time out of the water than in, so heat loss from evaporative cooling is much more consequential than heat loss from conduction. Hence the neoprene's water absorption is even more critical than its thickness. And this stuff absorbs next to nothing.

It's not cheap, and in the US there's additional shipping from the UK. But the difference in the material is quite dramatic. Full disclosure: I have no connection with the company.

 
In my world the only way to dingy is dry. The advice I got was your exposure protection should equip you for the water temp, not the spray and air temp. Wetsuit in winter in the water, no thanks.

Eric

 

Reht

Super Anarchist
2,758
6
A lot of modern wetsuits bead water when they are new. Neoprene isn't a sponge, and that's why some drysuit manufacturers use it as gasket material. When your suit is at least a season into use, then it's more interesting to see how dry ti keeps you. The most important feature I've found in wetsuits is wind protection, keeps the wind from getting to you or any water that has leaked in.

But as burnt said above, nothing beats a dry suit when it's really cold out. A good warm base layer and a well built dry suit you're happy all day in any weather. (I do have a winter wetsuit that comes out on occasion, but since getting a drysuit it sees less and less water time, hasn't been touched in over a year)

 
Top