What boat should I get - if any?

Overboard

New member
7
0
I don't want to overthink things here. I've been quite content to use the large variety of rental boats available in my area, and would continue going down that road indefinitely if not for... they won't let me single hand them. I'm interested in sailing more often than I can get people to join me, and frankly I intend to single hand sail quite a bit going forward, I enjoy being solo in the ocean, so... buying a boat is entering the equation.

I am very very new to sailing. But I'm also quite comfortable in the ocean, as a life long ocean going person. I would like something that I could somewhat comfortably and confidently take to Catalina and around the Channel Islands area.

I'm of a few minds here. Newer vs older, bigger vs smaller.

Get something newer: More expensive, things break less, but that means that I learn less about how things work. More depreciation, so that's lame.

Get something older: Less expensive, I get to learn about how the systems on a boat work as they fail and I replace them. Probably will be a bit simpler, that's always nice. Less depreciation, always nice!

Bigger: Maybe where I'll end up anyways, assuming I stick with sailing. Which is far from certain! Less easy to single hand.

Smaller: Less confident and comfortable in the ocean. Easier (and safer?) to single hand. I'll probably end up with something bigger eventually?

Basically I'm just looking to tap into the knowledge here, the experiences you all have had over the years. Is there anything that jumps out for someone who's just learning the ropes, but wants to get going into the ocean a bit more - and generally single handed... and who would like to have more in the way of conveniences and comforts? Is it generally a mistake to get something nicer when you're just starting out, as I assume it is?

Thanks for any advice you can give me, and thank you for reading all of this, if you've made it here haha.
 

nolatom

Super Anarchist
3,615
649
New Orleans
What's your oceangoing experience been like? Military? Merchant Marine? Marine biology? Where will most of your sailing be, Southern Cali? I won't guess, but if you're at home offshore, but new to sailing, you might try something in the 25-28-foot range, Ranger 26 maybe?

As to "Convenience and comforts", you're not going to find much of it in a sailboat you can singlehand easily, unless it's too fat and heavy to sail well, meaning some of the motorsailer designs.

Don't blow the bankroll til you've got more sailing experience. Get something brand-name, that'll resell easily. Like the Ranger.

Best wishes in any event.
 

Veeger

Super Anarchist
Way to throw red meat to the crowd!

Just do whatever you feel like doing. It doesn't really sound like you know just what you want to do. Buy, sell, rent, take up hiking, sail, don't sail. I've owned almost 10 different boats over the last 30 or 40 plus years (not counting all the little stuff).

I still find that my needs, wishes, desires, use-case, vary. You already don't like the limitation of renting/sail clubs. Time to get your feet wet and buy something.

Do you know what the costs are? Moorage, insurance, the innumerable trips to West Marine for life jackets, flares, hand held VHF, stove alcohol, I could go on. Basically, take the going monthly rate for moorage in your area (check wait lists too) and double it for your generic boat costs. Projects and capital expenditures are extra.

You can buy a 'cheap' boat, but it won't really be cheap. Figure on a 50% haircut when you sell whatever you get. (Broker fee, time value of money, etc) don't expect to recover any 'investments' in it. If you do better, well, great. If it still is do-able, then go for it.

Overall, buy something with some resale value. As you learn more, you'll want something different anyway.
 

Parma

Super Anarchist
2,990
396
here
I don't want to overthink things here. I've been quite content to use the large variety of rental boats available in my area, and would continue going down that road indefinitely if not for... they won't let me single hand them. I'm interested in sailing more often than I can get people to join me, and frankly I intend to single hand sail quite a bit going forward, I enjoy being solo in the ocean, so... buying a boat is entering the equation.

I am very very new to sailing. But I'm also quite comfortable in the ocean, as a life long ocean going person. I would like something that I could somewhat comfortably and confidently take to Catalina and around the Channel Islands area.

I'm of a few minds here. Newer vs older, bigger vs smaller.

Get something newer: More expensive, things break less, but that means that I learn less about how things work. More depreciation, so that's lame.

Get something older: Less expensive, I get to learn about how the systems on a boat work as they fail and I replace them. Probably will be a bit simpler, that's always nice. Less depreciation, always nice!

Bigger: Maybe where I'll end up anyways, assuming I stick with sailing. Which is far from certain! Less easy to single hand.

Smaller: Less confident and comfortable in the ocean. Easier (and safer?) to single hand. I'll probably end up with something bigger eventually?

Basically I'm just looking to tap into the knowledge here, the experiences you all have had over the years. Is there anything that jumps out for someone who's just learning the ropes, but wants to get going into the ocean a bit more - and generally single handed... and who would like to have more in the way of conveniences and comforts? Is it generally a mistake to get something nicer when you're just starting out, as I assume it is?

Thanks for any advice you can give me, and thank you for reading all of this, if you've made it here haha.
trolling for clicks, are we?
 

Overboard

New member
7
0
What's your oceangoing experience been like? Military? Merchant Marine? Marine biology? Where will most of your sailing be, Southern Cali? I won't guess, but if you're at home offshore, but new to sailing, you might try something in the 25-28-foot range, Ranger 26 maybe?

As to "Convenience and comforts", you're not going to find much of it in a sailboat you can singlehand easily, unless it's too fat and heavy to sail well, meaning some of the motorsailer designs.

Don't blow the bankroll til you've got more sailing experience. Get something brand-name, that'll resell easily. Like the Ranger.

Best wishes in any event.
Thank you for the best wishes. When you say 'too fat and heavy to sail well', are you including for example contemporary French mass produced boats &c?
 

Overboard

New member
7
0
Way to throw red meat to the crowd!

Just do whatever you feel like doing. It doesn't really sound like you know just what you want to do. Buy, sell, rent, take up hiking, sail, don't sail. I've owned almost 10 different boats over the last 30 or 40 plus years (not counting all the little stuff).

I still find that my needs, wishes, desires, use-case, vary. You already don't like the limitation of renting/sail clubs. Time to get your feet wet and buy something.

Do you know what the costs are? Moorage, insurance, the innumerable trips to West Marine for life jackets, flares, hand held VHF, stove alcohol, I could go on. Basically, take the going monthly rate for moorage in your area (check wait lists too) and double it for your generic boat costs. Projects and capital expenditures are extra.

You can buy a 'cheap' boat, but it won't really be cheap. Figure on a 50% haircut when you sell whatever you get. (Broker fee, time value of money, etc) don't expect to recover any 'investments' in it. If you do better, well, great. If it still is do-able, then go for it.

Overall, buy something with some resale value. As you learn more, you'll want something different anyway.
I like this advice. Just do whatever, learn as a I go, and figure it out. This is what's going to happen in any case, no matter how much research I do ahead of time. Never going to hit a bullseye with the first arrow.

Much appreciated, thank you.
 

robalex117

Super Anarchist
Geez. Kind of a wide open post. Just do what you want don't listen to us. Or maybe do what your wife/girlfriend wants. And more importantly as a first time poster rules say show us their tits. And if you are a female show us yours!!!!
 

FlyingCircus2

New member
43
34
If you're new to sailboats and want something you can solo safely, look at a cat boat (also called a Nonsuch). You can take one of these anywhere in europe and you will get there in one piece eventually.


Smaller is better: More boat, more problems, more buyers when you want to sell and buy something bigger. Trailer sailing also halves the cost.
 

Overboard

New member
7
0
So, what boat did you get?
Hey! The mods didn't approve my original replies for several days, so my Sept 19 messages didn't show up until who knows when.

Anyways I am still very not sure what I'm going to get. I may just keep chartering for a while, lame as that is. Hard to pull the trigger.

I do like Veeger's advice though: Just get something, see how it works, get something else later. So I may end up with something here eventually.

Pretty wishy washy as you call probably tell.
 

Overboard

New member
7
0
Geez. Kind of a wide open post. Just do what you want don't listen to us. Or maybe do what your wife/girlfriend wants. And more importantly as a first time poster rules say show us their tits. And if you are a female show us yours!!!!
I like this advice - not sure about the tit shots tho!
 

Overboard

New member
7
0
If you're new to sailboats and want something you can solo safely, look at a cat boat (also called a Nonsuch). You can take one of these anywhere in europe and you will get there in one piece eventually.


Smaller is better: More boat, more problems, more buyers when you want to sell and buy something bigger. Trailer sailing also halves the cost.
Thank you for the advice! Will look into these.
 

TBW

Member
431
240
Most boat owners go through a bunch of different boats, because you don't really know. I thought I wanted something about 30 feet, bought an older boat, that performed okay.

Then decided I wanted something bigger after a couple years, so went up to 35. Well, by the time you maintain all the systems on an older 35 year old boat, it might as well be a full time job. Wife and kids vacationed while I fixed stuff, without ever traveling more than a couple hundred miles from the marina, because vacation time is limited.

Then after a few years I dropped way down in size to a newer trailerable 21 ft cat boat. Way batter, fraction of the cost, almost no systems, super easy to single hand. I still have that boat but.

Then after a few years of that I discovered multi hull sailing. Now I am sailing a small trailerable trimaran. Faster than even the keel boats I owned, sails well enough it doesn't even need an outboard, so therefor even less maintenance and more time to sail. Perfect swim platform for snorkeling or just hanging out on.

But it's all personal, some are drawn to the comfort bigger boats offer, I like the simplicity of trailerables, and the speed of multihulls.
 

Veeger

Super Anarchist
The mods didn't approve your original replies?!?!?!?!

I think you must be confusing this forum with some other one(s). Never heard of this happening here--but I've only been around for 20 yrs give or take on this site. New owners might have changed something but....between this and your rather vague 'criteria' to begin with, well...you might just be here to play, neh?
 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
68,641
12,333
Great Wet North
Best advice on this that I ever heard;

Get the smallest boat that meets your needs, not the biggest one you think you can handle.


Plus, ensure it hits your emotional buttons, the row away factor.
 




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