What boat should I get - if any?

Overboard

New member
7
0
The mods didn't approve your original replies?!?!?!?!

I think you must be confusing this forum with some other one(s). Never heard of this happening here--but I've only been around for 20 yrs give or take on this site. New owners might have changed something but....between this and your rather vague 'criteria' to begin with, well...you might just be here to play, neh?
It’s just because I was a new member, they have to manually approve the first few posts from someone who’s just signed up.
 

feralcomp

Qualified Observer
40
36
Yes, there have been times when the whole site, every forum, was blizzarded with spam. Sometimes in Chinese (I think).
Yes, and that apparently skewed the signal to anarchyl ratio in the wrong direction and Something Had to be Done.

OP, buy a boat; you'll be glad you did (at least sometimes) and if nothing else you can crib the standard answers from the PH to Mac team I crewed on in the aughties when asked how we'd done.
1. "We learned a lot"
2. "Had a great time."
 

jerseyguy

Super Anarchist
Yes, and that apparently skewed the signal to anarchyl ratio in the wrong direction and Something Had to be Done.

OP, buy a boat; you'll be glad you did (at least sometimes) and if nothing else you can crib the standard answers from the PH to Mac team I crewed on in the aughties when asked how we'd done.
1. "We learned a lot"
2. "Had a great time."
Finished before we ran out of beer
 

Kiwi Clipper

Member
76
43
Overboard. IMHO what you should get is a 1960's 70's vintage fiberglass boat that's reasonably well designed up to about 30 feet. These are some favorites: Ranger 26, Ranger 33,Cal 25 or Cal2-24, Cal 27 or Cal 27II, Cal 29, Cal 30 or Cal 2-30. Moore 24, express 27. Of this last the last two are light but very good boats that are a hoot and a half to sail. All the others are fairly well balanced heavier boats that sail well and on which you could spend ten years learning to sail.
There were in fact thousands of boats built during that period. Some were really quite good, and there were a ton that were not so good. There are a ton of different reasons boats turned out to be not so good. Let me give you some examples: In the ranger line, I had a Ranger 23, but it's too low to the water and takes too much water in through its forward hatch in big seas; The ranger 29 is a lot of boat and great in light air but not as good as the 26 when the going gets rough. I left out all the Sparkman and Stevens designs because they were behind the curve on designing boats that would surf. Of the Catalina's the 27 is the only one with decent design, but not as strong built as the others; The columbia 26 is a tank, pretty good sailing and can go anywhere but butt ugly.
There are plenty of boats available for pretty cheap on the list I gave you. But they are older boats and you may have to put a fair amount into them to caulk leaks, replace rigging, might need to resurface and/or repaint the deck and or bottom with awlgrip adding new non skid, I wouldn't be afraid of the expense because you will be putting it into a good boat. The ladies don't like older boats because they are dirty. New awlgrip on the deck and cockpit and new paint inside (single coat polyester is fine) and the ladies will like it. And if you want to get better and expand your range, learning all the fixups will make you a better yachtsman.
One thing in particular, Old sails are kept on boats for years longer than they should be there. Newer properly shaped sails will make the boats a joy to sail. I know guys who bought old boats then bought old sails and then complain the boats don't sail too good. Along with this new bottom paint at least every three years and clean bottom before you sail for good performance. And get someone to tell you what a cunningham is, and how to use it.
All the fixes cost money and the bigger the boat, the more money. And mostly you won't recover the value when you sell the boat.
If I were you, I would also try to find a yacht club where you can find boats that need crew for races and spend a few years learning what they do to make boats go fast. Then you can apply what you learn to your boat.
Good luck.
 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
44,287
9,617
Eastern NC
Overboard. IMHO what you should get is a 1960's 70's vintage fiberglass boat that's reasonably well designed up to about 30 feet. These are some favorites: Ranger 26, Ranger 33,Cal 25 or Cal2-24, Cal 27 or Cal 27II, Cal 29, Cal 30 or Cal 2-30. Moore 24, express 27. Of this last the last two are light but very good boats that are a hoot and a half to sail. All the others are fairly well balanced heavier boats that sail well and on which you could spend ten years learning to sail.
There were in fact thousands of boats built during that period. Some were really quite good, and there were a ton that were not so good. There are a ton of different reasons boats turned out to be not so good. Let me give you some examples: In the ranger line, I had a Ranger 23, but it's too low to the water and takes too much water in through its forward hatch in big seas; The ranger 29 is a lot of boat and great in light air but not as good as the 26 when the going gets rough. I left out all the Sparkman and Stevens designs because they were behind the curve on designing boats that would surf. Of the Catalina's the 27 is the only one with decent design, but not as strong built as the others; The columbia 26 is a tank, pretty good sailing and can go anywhere but butt ugly.
There are plenty of boats available for pretty cheap on the list I gave you. But they are older boats and you may have to put a fair amount into them to caulk leaks, replace rigging, might need to resurface and/or repaint the deck and or bottom with awlgrip adding new non skid, I wouldn't be afraid of the expense because you will be putting it into a good boat. The ladies don't like older boats because they are dirty. New awlgrip on the deck and cockpit and new paint inside (single coat polyester is fine) and the ladies will like it. And if you want to get better and expand your range, learning all the fixups will make you a better yachtsman.
One thing in particular, Old sails are kept on boats for years longer than they should be there. Newer properly shaped sails will make the boats a joy to sail. I know guys who bought old boats then bought old sails and then complain the boats don't sail too good. Along with this new bottom paint at least every three years and clean bottom before you sail for good performance. And get someone to tell you what a cunningham is, and how to use it.
All the fixes cost money and the bigger the boat, the more money. And mostly you won't recover the value when you sell the boat.
If I were you, I would also try to find a yacht club where you can find boats that need crew for races and spend a few years learning what they do to make boats go fast. Then you can apply what you learn to your boat.
Good luck.

Cleaning is the easiest rehab work you can do on an older boat.

And yet, for some reason, people just don't clean stuff. I don't get it... actually I'm guilty to some extent of the same thing, I cleaned dirt-dauber mud (fukkin wasps get into everything) out of some bilge pockets of our engine room and this year there is more... but you see people undertaking big projects on old boats that are filthy and oil-pocked even in the places they are rebuilding.
 

Kiwi Clipper

Member
76
43
It's true. A thorough cleaning does wonders for a boat. Also, after you clean, you can see better where there may be gel coat cracks or even the beginning of fiberglass tears that need to be fixed. For sure also, before you paint, you have to clean, otherwise you are just painting the dirt. One reason the ladies like repainted clean is because the old gel coat surface gets powdery and even when clean leaves white powder on people's clothes.
 

mckenzie.keith

Aspiring Anarchist
705
207
Santa Cruz
Don't buy a boat that is expensive or that is only cheap because it needs a lot of work. Sailing is more fun than working on boats. Maybe you can get a Newport 30. Or any other 30 foot boat. Or if you want a smaller boat then get a smaller boat. On the other hand, if the 30 foot boat seems too small you may opt to go with a larger boat. The only reason I mention the Newport 30 is because that was the first boat I sailed on (it belonged to my step-father). It was a fun boat, and you could sleep on it if you want. I would not want to sail it to Hawaii.
 

slap

Super Anarchist
5,958
1,370
Somewhat near Naptown
Assuming reasonably priced boats, it's usually cheaper to buy a boat in good condition than to buy a boat in poor condition and fix it up. And running costs (slip fees, insurance, maintenance, etc) over time can quickly exceed the cost of the boat. I've got a somewhat premium boat (J/32) that I bought in excellent condition when it was 17 years old. I figure that in less than 10 years the the total running costs will have exceeded the purchase price.
 

jerseyguy

Super Anarchist
Assuming reasonably priced boats, it's usually cheaper to buy a boat in good condition than to buy a boat in poor condition and fix it up. And running costs (slip fees, insurance, maintenance, etc) over time can quickly exceed the cost of the boat. I've got a somewhat premium boat (J/32) that I bought in excellent condition when it was 17 years old. I figure that in less than 10 years the the total running costs will have exceeded the purchase price.
Agree totally. Back in my racing days I would annually budget about 15% of the boat’s purchase price for maintenance, repair and upgrades. Slip fees, Winter storage, insurance, etc. Then the upgrades as the stuff from the factory was iffy. Micro-Fico rubber wheel main traveler car and track replaced with Harken. Single speed winches replaced with 2 speed self-tailors, rope vang replaced with Hall Quik-Vang, and on and on and on. Can’t forget new sails.

Easily spent the boat’s purchase price on such stuff
 

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