What custom cruiser...if money were no object?

Elegua

Generalissimo
4,377
1,945
Lower Loslobia
67' seems a difficult size. I mean it big enough to need crew, but not quite big enough for true privacy. 

I'm conflicted between something like a carbon cutter or a cruising sled like the Riptide. 

 

kent_island_sailor

Super Anarchist
26,890
4,860
Kent Island!
I've been thinking about this since 2015, or so. Let's just say you have a spare million, or whatever you think you need:

So, at night, when you crawl into the sack, in that period between relaxation and sleep, what would your ideal custom cruiser be?

Ketch-rigged Cruiser - A Fast Reaching Passage Maker
Anemōnē (Wind Flower)

Somewhat traditional look, but with modern design, features and construction. Strip planked and or cold moulded timber, glassed inside/vinylester outside and inside any water-tight bulkheads. Decks may be glassed or core sandwich fibreglass.

Hull:
DWL of 43’. approx., but less than 14 metres max. overall.
Good hull volume, but not too beamy aft.
Sufficient freeboard to provide minimum 1.9 metres headroom throughout main cabin.
Good medium-hard turn to bilge. 
No extravagant overhangs. Plumbish bow and close to plumb stern to maximise reaching waterline length, but with maybe some handsome transom curve.
Not too fine an entry and carrying good hull volume forward. A bit of reserve buoyancy for a drier ride and with a broad foredeck. A reasonable hull rocker and with a bit of deadrise in her run aft. 
Medium draft keel (say max 2 metres) with plenty of ballast. She needs to be stiff and able to carry her rag in a blow.
Balanced spade rudder, with carbon fibre shaft and self-aligning bearings. 
Laminated wood (brightwork), tiller steering.
Good size brightwork toe rail and beefy rubbing strake.
Stern foldaway swimming platform, with integrated stainless steps.
 

Decks:
Non-skid pattern on deck and coach roof. 
Brightwork timber toe and grab rails.
Lowish profile, brightwork cabin trunk. Could be stepped.
Opening ports set in cabin windows in galley, heads, saloon and quarter berths.
Hatches in foredeck and double hatches in cabin truck.
Off-centred port side Companionway (to facilitate easy access around mizzen mast, if space limited requires.
Stainless Pulpit/Pushpit, Lifelines, Fences and Gates (port & starboard).

Winches:
4 x electric cockpit primary. 
2 x electric secondary on coach roof.
2 x main and mizzen mast.
3 x coach roof cam banks (2 forward, 1 aft).
Electric anchor windlass, with remote.

Accommodations:
Two double cabins; one forward, one aft, with adjoining head, vanity and shower cubicles.
Galley starboard side aft, with gas fridge, freezer, and gas gimballed hob/oven/grill.
Navigation table/station opposite galley, with electrical control panel, comms and circuit breaker board.
Saloon L berth settee to port, with folding table as convertible double berth. 
Single settee berth opposite. Good accessible storage behind and under settees. Pilot berth starboard side.
Diesel space heater in saloon, against port main bulkhead, venting through deck.
Brightwork ply veneer bulkheads and interior cabinetry, with large corner radii.
Water, waste water holding tank and diesel tanks, with through-deck filler fittings.

Auxiliary Motor & Power:
Diesel (45hp) under companionway stairs with Saildrive and 3-bladed kiwi prop
Alternator.
Electric bow thruster (drop down type).
Electric windlass with pulpit/cockpit dual controls.
Anchor locker & deck washer.
Electric halyard and sheet winch foot controls.
Batteries: One starter & 4 x deep cycle, house batteries. Spare starter battery, as switchable backup. 
Battery monitor and spilt diode charging control. 12v & 24v electrics with inverter and fuse/breaker board display, in nav station.
LED lighting throughout, including navigation lights/ masthead and riding lights.
Main mast mounted spreader deck lights.
Hot/cold water taps and faucets to galley, cockpit, showers and head vanities.
Electric bilge pumps x 2 and manual backup. 
2 x gas bottles in cockpit locker. Gas audible monitor/alarm for bilge.

Electronics:
AIS/VHF
GPS
Chart Plotter
AutoPilot
Echo sounder/fishfinder
Wind speed/TWA/AWA
Sum log/boat speed/SOG
steering compass
Masthead antenna, with splitter (for VHF, AIS and FM).

Rig:
Carbon main & mizzen masts, and leisurefurl booms. Fixed foot holds to both mastheads.
Fractional rigged with main and inner forestay, with roller reefing.
Main and mizzen standing backstays with triatic stays between. 
Main and mizzen telescopic kickers, with blocks & tackle.
Leisurefurl booms with internal reefing.
All short-handed sail controls back to coachroof and cockpit cam banks.

Sail Plan:
Cruising triradial main and mizzen sails
Non-overlapping triradial staysail and jibs x 2
Code 0 and asymmetric spinnaker (with snuffer) tacked off anchor bowroller fairlead.
Mizzen triradial staysail.
Storm trysail & Jib
All sails, except storm jib, in heavy white dacron,
Sails by Doyle (or North).

Dream on old man....

Lauri Davidson designed this beauty, Tauranga, which is for sale in Aussie. She'd do me, but is just too much boat for my purposes. But she is very smart and priced well.

View attachment 369904
If cost is NO object, I vote for the Savannah. Cruise the world with all your friends in luxury without emitting one ounce of CO2 :D

iu


 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
42,279
8,597
Eastern NC
If money is no object I'm going big with crew, mechanic/electrician, chef. No interest in a sufferfest. 


Like this?

image057.jpg


It would be fun to ride around in, but they're noisy and rolly, and you wouldn't believe how much the crew eats. Or their table manners, for that matter....

FB- Doug

 

El Borracho

Sam’s friend
6,430
2,447
Pacific Rim
If money is no object I'm going big with crew, mechanic/electrician, chef. No interest in a sufferfest. 
The worst possible addition to a cruise is professional crew. However quite handy for maintenance. Consider a very pleasant cruising sailboat for you and your several friends, with all the toys you desire. And then a second maintenance ship to follow along that the crew can live on and do whatever annoying things they do. It could have the helipad, freezers, fuel, scuba shop, too...

 

Cruisin Loser

Super Anarchist
The hypothetical was unlimited money. You guys do it your way. I've hung with people with large household or yacht staffs. Didn't seem like a problem. 

Of course, those guys made money by being very smart and handling businesses well, which means significant people and management skills.

There are a lot big boats out there. The idea that crew requirements make them misery for the owners is unsupported by the sheer numbers of these things in use, and the building activity at Royal Huisman and Feadship.

Of course, being a hypothetical means it's not going to happen, which means I just have to be happy with what I've got. I think I can deal with that.

 
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kent_island_sailor

Super Anarchist
26,890
4,860
Kent Island!
My idea not only requires crew, but crew trained to operate a nuclear reactor. You all did recognize the Savannah is nuclear powered, right? I will have the cash, so my people will be handling all that.

"Hey, a piece of uranium fell on the floor and the engineer has three heads now"

"Handle it Jeeves and don't even think about paying the engineer three times his salary, the three of them can live as cheap as one"

 

Sailbydate

Super Anarchist
11,338
3,057
Kohimarama
She looks interesting, Yves-Marie. I can't quite make out detail on that sail plan. There's a square sail there, right?

851pic.jpg.4c6cd6dfdee6873dc29b24c91d90982d.jpg

 

Matagi

Ambassador of the Republic of R'lyeh
Even if I had unlimited funds, I would still buy something pretty humble. Not that I don't have dreams or that I don't enjoy the beauty of a nice custom boat.

But I think I would rather want to spend the money on experiences and on ways to capture them, not on the boat itself. I am also a believer in more classic designs, maybe I would spend the money on preserving something beautiful with a history, to which I could add some chapters, and then, later, my sons and their families. 

I would need to be able to drive the boat and have fun with it and picture it in rough conditions in the North Sea, going Heligoland > Edinburgh in four days. Now and in my 70ies, some thirty years away. I would also need to see me being able to cater for the boat then (not financially, that is -per the premise of this thread- taken care of, but I like to take care of my boats physically).  Possibly I would spend some money on transporting it over land, from the Med to the Baltic and back.

I would also want my wife to be able to drive it, also in rough conditions, so that I can get a bit of sleep, down below. Or that she could get me out, in the worst case.

So it can very well be an HR 29. But as it's supposed to be custom-made: 

BM30%20BRISTOL%20BAHIA%20UpWind.jpg


A Berckemeyer 30. Not high on the fancy-sh't list, I know. But in my opinion, the sailor needs to be more adaptable than the boat.

 

Elegua

Generalissimo
4,377
1,945
Lower Loslobia
The hypothetical was unlimited money. You guys do it your way. I've hung with people with large household or yacht staffs. Didn't seem like a problem. 

Of course, those guys made money by being very smart and handling businesses well, which means significant people and management skills.

There are a lot big boats out there. The idea that crew requirements make them misery for the owners is unsupported by the sheer numbers of these things in use, and the building activity at Royal Huisman and Feadship.

Of course, being a hypothetical means it's not going to happen, which means I just have to be happy with what I've got. I think I can deal with that.
Fair enough. The drama is there, but money being no object, you just have to have a boat/house big enough so that you can't see it and hire and retain the managers to keep it under wraps. Yet sometimes you just want to drive your own damn car. 

 
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savoir

Super Anarchist
4,907
195
The hypothetical was unlimited money. You guys do it your way. I've hung with people with large household or yacht staffs. Didn't seem like a problem. 

Of course, those guys made money by being very smart and handling businesses well, which means significant people and management skills.

There are a lot big boats out there. The idea that crew requirements make them misery for the owners is unsupported by the sheer numbers of these things in use, and the building activity at Royal Huisman and Feadship.

Of course, being a hypothetical means it's not going to happen, which means I just have to be happy with what I've got. I think I can deal with that.
The people with the really big gin palaces don't use them like a boat all that much.  They use them more like a portable hotel and occasional picnic table.

 
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