What do you yell at the helmsman when reversing?

Omer

Anarchist
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You are reversing out of a marina berth. Once your bow clears the boat next to you, you need to swing the stern hard to right as you are facing/looking back.  (If you were looking normally ahead the bow swinging to strbrd) What would be the instruction to give to the helmsman. Put the wheel hard to port or strbrd. or anything else?  Is it the direction you are going takes precedence regardless of where the bow and stern is, or  the rudder angle you want if you were going forward? 

 

Omer

Anarchist
902
30
"Bow is clear", what they do with that information is their own responsibility.
There must be a technically correct answer to that. What if you are the captain of a large ship (or worse a navy vessel) reversing into a tight channel or what. What orders would you give to the helmsman?  ''I want to park my ass there first and then get the hell out of here... do what ever is necessary'' might not be good enough.

 

Monkey

Super Anarchist
10,859
2,490
There must be a technically correct answer to that. What if you are the captain of a large ship (or worse a navy vessel) reversing into a tight channel or what. What orders would you give to the helmsman?  ''I want to park my ass there first and then get the hell out of here... do what ever is necessary'' might not be good enough.
This isn’t rocket science. Port is still port, starboard is still starboard. Do you unbolt your running lights and flip flop them when you back up?

 

sailman

Super Anarchist
8,320
436
Portsmouth, RI
There must be a technically correct answer to that. What if you are the captain of a large ship (or worse a navy vessel) reversing into a tight channel or what. What orders would you give to the helmsman?  ''I want to park my ass there first and then get the hell out of here... do what ever is necessary'' might not be good enough.
Someone on the bow of a ship does NOT give orders to the Bridge

 

The Q

Super Anarchist
Left hand down a bit!!!!

For those not remembering 1950s 60s UK radio comedies, that comes from "The Navy Lark"

Ps, all the helmsman needs to know is "bow clear", if can't manouver the boat after that, he shouldn't be at the helm.

 

nolatom

Super Anarchist
3,611
640
New Orleans
There must be a technically correct answer to that. What if you are the captain of a large ship (or worse a navy vessel) reversing into a tight channel or what. What orders would you give to the helmsman?  ''I want to park my ass there first and then get the hell out of here... do what ever is necessary'' might not be good enough.
On a large ship, the helmsman isn't able to see the stern anyway.  And you'd have tugs for turning maneuvers in tight quarters. And the third mate aft to tell you what's up.  A tidbit worth knowing--A US-flag ship, in US waters typically uses left and right as rudder commands.  For the non-US flag ships in US waters (and elsewhere) it's Port and Starboard.  The local pilots will do likewise in giving the rudder commands.  "Midships" is the same world-round.

I'd agree that trying to give any order "adapted" to looking aft, is asking for confusion and uh-oh.  Hard right means turn top of the wheel to the right,with the

helmsman "facing forward" regardless of which way he/she is actually facing (I know, duh).   Keep it simple.

 
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coyotepup

Anarchist
793
137
Michigan
There must be a technically correct answer to that. What if you are the captain of a large ship (or worse a navy vessel) reversing into a tight channel or what. What orders would you give to the helmsman?  ''I want to park my ass there first and then get the hell out of here... do what ever is necessary'' might not be good enough.
On a Navy ship the conn (and ONLY THE CONN and NOBODY ELSE) gives orders to the helmsman.  (If the captain were to give an order to the helm, the next words out of the conning officer's mouth are "Captain has the conn."  Eventually the captain gives the conn to whoever he wants, whenever he wants.  But otherwise the helmsman is trained to listen to one person only.)  And in tight maneuvering the conn gives orders what to do with the wheel and that's all.  "Left ten degrees rudder," etc.  And the helmsman turns the wheel left until the rudder is ten degrees over.

If you decide to shout "left ten degrees rudder" at the skipper of your sailboat as you back out of a well, let us know how that goes.

 

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