what is it?

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
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They were not designed for a DIY builder.

Been a while since I read about the history of the class, but I'm believe the design was commissioned by Lawley's.  The idea was to have a small one-design class that they could build on speculation to fill gaps in their production schedule and keep their staff employed between larger jobs.  Why plywood?  It was partly because it was a new material in 1946 and Lawley's wanted to experiment with it, and partly because the plywood design allowed Lawley's to make extensive use of gigs and templates.
They actually started im tje late 30s and Ray wanted ro reduce costs to achieve speed at any given length.Lawleys then; later Graves. The 225 came first and 110 scaled down. Very few of the former were built. They easily beat 6 metres almost every time.

 

BobBill

Super Anarchist
4,611
101
SE Minnesota.
Fast...+1 and

I should have added...USA does need smallish two-person, keeler as Flying Fifteen has been eclipsed here...

We missed out with the Ninja outrigger came in a box, out of SA.

And continually ignore these fun keelers...only prob is no lifting keels as done on the very fun Wylie-17.....IMO.

 
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Steve Clark

Super Anarchist
https://110class.com/

A very cool boat sailed by very cool people.  The image at the top of the tread is badly compressed. The hull is 24’ long and 50” wide and has a sort of two trapezoid keel that is about 3’ deep.  The rig is a bit old fashioned with a low boom and a big jib- sort of FD like- and the kite is smaller than you would expect compared to modern boats.  

The boat “kind of got lost” in the end of the 20th century but it was way ahead of it’s time and still a really nice boat to sail.  I crewed for my brother when I was 10 or so and had a miserable time, but all the big kids I admired, ( Robbie Doyle etc) sailed them and I liked the boat. Ours just sucked and there wasn’t much an 11 year old can do about that, particularly if his brother hates him and feels it’s his job to keep me in my place..... He had a point, he did all the work painting the boat and getting it in the water and I just bitched about how we didn’t have a smooth bottom. So he handed me the paintbrush and the can of Gloucester Sea Jacket death in a can, said “OK wise ass, you do it!” and stormed off.  About an hour later they pulled my unconscious body out from under the boat.  It was the 60’s and Right to Know legislation and Product Safety Labeling was in the future. Not that we would have paid much attention....

All that aside, the 110 enjoys the same “ trick” that makes sailing canoes work. They are very long for their weight and the amount of crew they have to support. When they doubled their righting moment by adding a trapeze in the late 60s they went from being normally quick to being damn quick.  They aren’t particularly difficult to sail.

i haven’t really gotten over the 110 because Marion changed to Tempests before I had a chance to ( as I imagined it) kick everyone’s ass.  I have lurked around, but this summer I sailed the Nationals with National Treasure Milly Biller. We had fun and I took up a project that had been in the “ We need. We ought to” basket for a number of years. That is developing a construction plan that can be CNC cut and which is more contemporary than the 1940s era building instructions currently available from the Class, something  like the I550.The boat isn’t hard to build, but figuring it out is more than most feel like attempting.  There has to be a way to get new boats for any class to grow. There are lots of rescue and repair jobs available, but many people don’t want to take on the project, or pay someone else to do it.  I dig this stuff, and I have spent a bit of time thinking about the 110 I would want in order “wreak my revenge.”  

The Kit, as we call it, besides being a straight forward way to build a fully competitive 110, also addresses one of the legacy issues in the class. The 110 was designed, and most of the boats were built, before self recovery was a standard feature.  There was enough flotation so that if you swamped, you pulled down your sails and waited patently for someone to tow you in. In Marion, this guy was named Hoyt Watson, and for something like 30 years he patrolled  the area between Anjelica Point to Wings Neck every race day.  If you couldn’t make it home, Uncle Hoyt would be there in 10 minutes or so to throw you a line. He was an angel long before he died

These days most 110s have enough flotation to save themselves by throwing water with a bucket, about like an Optimist, but not enough to reliably sail out of a knock down.  I believe you have to do better than that, so this arrangement has a sealed double bottom and air tanks under the bow and stern larde enough to make it almost impossible not to sail the boat home.  110s love big breeze but we’re always vulnerable to filling with water and becoming disabled.  We should be able to have Big Fun with boats built like this.

We are in the last few weeks of getting it all together. The digital files an the license to build will be available from the 110 class probably in the New Year.

SHC

 

WCB

Super Anarchist
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862
Park City, UT
The 110 site has #705, a 50 yr old with trailer and newish sails for $2K!!
I believe he wanted $4k at one point. There's also one for $5k in the SA classifieds.  

It's not too bad...a  24' boat with newish sails for $2k, that means ready to compete pretty much.

 

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
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I believe he wanted $4k at one point. There's also one for $5k in the SA classifieds.  

It's not too bad...a  24' boat with newish sails for $2k, that means ready to compete pretty much.
Compare to 30 years ago this is esentially a free boat.

 




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