what to do?

Editor

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carlsbad
We thought the community might be able to jump in here and offer some suggestions, other than "show us your tits."

Hello from Corfu Greece!. I would like to seek some knowledge on the refit my beloved "Barbarossa", a 1986 Jacques Faroux quarter tonner. The previous owner was thought that she has a trawler, as you can see from the above photo! I used to race with old IOR boats like "Big Greek Machine" (ex Williwaw), some X 3/4 tonners and i'm very nostalgic about these old designs.

My plan is to rebuild the boat in her old lines (no keel & rudder mods or mast replacement). So if someone has any ideas, tips or plans on what I am looking do it would be helpful to have them contact me. Thanks a lot for this opportunity!! - Anarchist Dionisis.

what to do.jpg

 

Death Roll

Super Anarchist
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Well if his name is Dionysus and the boat is in Greece I would think the only refit necessary would be to load it up with copious amounts of wine and some nymphs and just see where that leads.

And get rid of that stupid teak anchor roller/thing.

 

Soley

Super Anarchist
Don't spend a shit ton of moeny on the boat until you have raced her for a bit. The best ideas for modifications and upgrades come from racing the boat.

Also you may find it scary as hell racing that thing and want to off load it sharp.

Right now ton class boats have owners with a very bright tint of rose in the sailing sunglasses.

 

Somebody Else

a person of little consequence
7,554
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PNW
One of Dionisis obstacles is that he's 230+ nautical miles from the racing action of Athens (Pireus, Microlimino, Glyfada.) Another obstacle is the heavy tax on imported marine hardware.

There are two sources of help: the racing community and the charter community. Both know the ways around high import duties and where to source parts locally. The Royal Yacht Club may be a little hard to penetrate, but the Pireus Sailing Club may be more receptive. Closer to home, check out the local charter scene. Most charter boat BNs have some racer in their souls. They are often a great source of local knowledge on where to buy stuff or get it made. Also practical knowledge like what to use to isolate dissimilar metals when reassembling.

Off the top of my head I'm guessing he will need all new cordage and standing rigging (a motor-oriented previous owner would not have replaced the standing rigging -- ever.) And most likely all new sails. Other than that, I would guess from the photos that most of the hardware is intact and only spot replacement should be necessary. Break down the winches, clean and grease 'em up.

When the mast is down for standing rigging replacement, go over the halyard exits, repairing chewed-up aluminum and replacing sheaves as required. Find someone who can weld aluminum to build-up areas that have been chewed away. Once they have been built up with new material, filed to shape and sanded smooth, use an etching primer then a 2-part polyurethane paint to protect the spars. It may be easier to to get new sheaves made locally. In most cases it is best to source the material yourself and give it and the old part to the machinist. This way you will know what metal (or micarta or delrin or whatever) is being used instead of relying on whatever the machinist has lying around. As an incentive to get a lower cost, offer to let the machinist keep the leftover material. Going to the new high modulus line for halyards will be better than replacing the crispy, barby wire-to-rope, but those rough spots on the aluminum need to be addressed. Also, going with a local (Athens) sailmaker will save money over imports. You will need accurate rig dimensions (I, J, P, E, SPL) as well as any offsets for tack or clew fittings. Bolt rope diameter or mast slides, etc. Giving the old sails to the sailmaker will help but you should still supply accurate I, E, P, E, SPL measurements because the sails could be stretched, shrunk or adapted from another boat.

 

plywood froggie

New member
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We thought the community might be able to jump in here and offer some suggestions, other than "show us your tits."

Hello from Corfu Greece!. I would like to seek some knowledge on the refit my beloved "Barbarossa", a 1986 Jacques Faroux quarter tonner. The previous owner was thought that she has a trawler, as you can see from the above photo! I used to race with old IOR boats like "Big Greek Machine" (ex Williwaw), some X 3/4 tonners and i'm very nostalgic about these old designs.

My plan is to rebuild the boat in her old lines (no keel & rudder mods or mast replacement). So if someone has any ideas, tips or plans on what I am looking do it would be helpful to have them contact me. Thanks a lot for this opportunity!! - Anarchist Dionisis.
Hello from France!

You might go to this site,

http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/

Not only "histoire des halfs, story of any half tonner existing, but quarter as well, and extending to any racing class.

French AND english speaking

Fair winds and following seas.

 

fodex2000

Member
148
0
Athens
If you know the builder contact them for design details.

If not, contact Jeanneau and ask for contact details of Jacques Faroux. It is easier than you think to even

get the original drawings of the boat

good luck

 
We thought the community might be able to jump in here and offer some suggestions, other than "show us your tits."

Hello from Corfu Greece!. I would like to seek some knowledge on the refit my beloved "Barbarossa", a 1986 Jacques Faroux quarter tonner. The previous owner was thought that she has a trawler, as you can see from the above photo! I used to race with old IOR boats like "Big Greek Machine" (ex Williwaw), some X 3/4 tonners and i'm very nostalgic about these old designs.

My plan is to rebuild the boat in her old lines (no keel & rudder mods or mast replacement). So if someone has any ideas, tips or plans on what I am looking do it would be helpful to have them contact me. Thanks a lot for this opportunity!! - Anarchist Dionisis.
Hello from France!

You might go to this site,

http://www.histoiredeshalfs.com/

Not only "histoire des halfs, story of any half tonner existing, but quarter as well, and extending to any racing class.

French AND english speaking

Fair winds and following seas.
Great site

Why don't you have a 3/4 tonner as well?

Gonçalo

 
I have a 1981 Jacques Fauroux Quarter Tonner which we rescued from sitting on a mooring for a decade and have enjoyed racing competitively over the last few years. All we did was take out the mast, move the chainplates to the edge of the boat and aft about 20cm, cut a new hole in the deck for the mast 20cm aft of the original, sleeve 80cm onto an Etchells mast and stick it in the boat. Second-hand Etchells main, kite, and jib (with 80cm luff length added due to longer mast). Throw in a near-masthead asymmetric kite for light air running, and a fractional asymmetric for reaching, and you're off and running for a fraction of a modern boat. It rates 0.889 on IRC and it's a weapon. Bloody good fun too. Photos: http://gallery.me.com/jamiemcw/100214

I recommend you go to http://www.quartertonclass.org/ which is THE source of info on all things 1/4-ton. There is a 1981 Fauroux over there called Menace which the boys REALLY did a number on, it's beautiful.

 
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