What to Read

bmiller

Super Anarchist
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The first three books of the Louis L'Amour Sackett series are not typical of his genre. The story begins in 16th century England and crosses the Atlantic settling around Tennessee and North Carolina. I enjoyed them.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sackett

As the series progresses it becomes more of the typical western, cowboys, injuns, rustlers shoot em up.

I'm working through it, will take awhile to get through 17 books, if I stick with it.

 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
42,326
8,612
Eastern NC
Maritime related- Grey Seas Under by Farley Mowatt, stories of an ocean tug/rescue vessel in the mid/late 1930s... could be considered slightly fiction but based on true stories.

Books mentioned in this thread I heartily second: the Sharpe series, the Hornblower series,

(nonfiction) The Hot Zone, Blind Man's Bluff, author Jared Diamond's Guns Germs And Steel is tremendous but honestly I had to put down his COLLAPSE because it's just so-o depressing... I mean yeah we're all gonna die but a whole book devoted to scientifically proving how stupid we are about it??

(fiction again) John MacDonald definitely hit the Travis McGee series, Agatha Christie, Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier,

Definitely going to follow up on some of the recommendations, that you all

- DSK

 

Black Sox

Super Anarchist
3,068
1,125
Dublin, Ireland
Maritime:

Nicholas Montserrat - The Cruel Sea, The Master Mariner, HMS Marlborough Will Enter Harbour

Alistair McLean - HMS Ulysses, Bear Island

Douglas Reeman - many RN-based thrillers (sadly, not as engaging as Montserrat)

Tom Clancy - The Hunt For Red October

Patrick O' Brian - Aubrey/Maturin series. Read them all and in order. I have, about six times.

The Unlikely Voyage Of Jack De Crow (a quirky account by a guy who sailed a mirror dinghy from central England to Eastern Europe)

Non-maritime:

Tom Clancy - anything before he started co-authoring. Red Storm Rising is especially good.

The 13th Valley

Chickenhawk

CW2

Once A Warrior King

The Sharpe Series

Most of Frederick Forsyth but especially The Dogs Of War and The Day Of The Jackal

The Slough House series by Mick Herron

Jordan B Peterson - 12 Rules For Life

Neville Shute - Most Secret

James Clavell - King Rat

John Harris - Covenant With Death (WWI fom the POV of a fictional British soldier, heartbreaking)

CS Forester - non-Hornblower such as The Gun, The Ship

Terry Pratchett - Discworld series

Gerald Durrell - My Family And Other Animals

Roddy Doyle - The Commitments, The Van, The Snapper, The Woman Who Walked Into Doors

Better stop now!

 
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Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
19,179
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Poland
Grey Seas Under by Farley Mowatt, stories of an ocean tug/rescue vessel in the mid/late 1930s... could be considered slightly fiction but based on true stories.
Many think that everything Mowat wrote is more fiction than fact.  Even he considered his work to be "Subjective non-fiction", and he also said: 

“I never let facts get in the way of a good story.” and “Fuck the facts. The truth is what is important.” 

I think he should have just been honest about it from the beginning and he said the above quotes after he got found out.  I guess that truth is subjective too.

 

The Main Man

Super Anarchist
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270
Blighty
If you like Sharpe and like a bit of Roman historical fiction then I can highly recommend Simon Scarrow’s Eagle series with Macro and Cato.

 

sledracr

Super Anarchist
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a bit of Roman historical fiction then I can highly recommend Simon Scarrow’s Eagle series with Macro and Cato.
I'll give that a look, thanks!

Roman historical fiction was never really my thing, until I came across "the Camulod Chronicles" (Jack Whyte).  It's an arc of 8 or 9 books, first one set in 4th-century britain, when a couple of centurions decide to stick around rather than go back to Rome when the occupation of the British Isles falls apart.  Really good story teller and, as the story unfolds, there are some interesting ties to the legends of Arthur and Merlin...

 

The Main Man

Super Anarchist
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270
Blighty
I'll give that a look, thanks!

Roman historical fiction was never really my thing, until I came across "the Camulod Chronicles" (Jack Whyte).  It's an arc of 8 or 9 books, first one set in 4th-century britain, when a couple of centurions decide to stick around rather than go back to Rome when the occupation of the British Isles falls apart.  Really good story teller and, as the story unfolds, there are some interesting ties to the legends of Arthur and Merlin...
You won’t regret it! They’re even talking about making a film out of it.

 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
42,326
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Eastern NC
I'll give that a look, thanks!

Roman historical fiction was never really my thing, until I came across "the Camulod Chronicles" (Jack Whyte).  It's an arc of 8 or 9 books, first one set in 4th-century britain, when a couple of centurions decide to stick around rather than go back to Rome when the occupation of the British Isles falls apart.  Really good story teller and, as the story unfolds, there are some interesting ties to the legends of Arthur and Merlin...
Mary Rennault.

Outstanding truth-based historical fiction. She also wrote a Life Of Alexander The Great.

Doug K

 

Swaying

New member
34
7
DC, USA
Since Undaunted Courage and Pynchon were mentioned above, I have to recommend Pynchon's Mason & Dixon. Tremendously entertaining, historical, all-around amazing book. Written with a lot of Snaggletooth-ian olde english I recall, but it has been 24 years since I read it. Long, and so good I wish it had been twice as long. Save it for when you have a lot of time because it could be hard to follow if you lose momentum.  Perfect book for a deployment or maybe an ocean crossing.  Just so happened I read Longitude by Dava Sobel (non-fiction, excellent, short, nautical) just prior and that turned out to be good background for Mason & Dixon, helped with understanding 18th c. navigation and surveying.

I'll second the recommendations for Angle of Repose, Louis L'Amour, John D MacDonald, PT Deutermann (Navy Capt), Chickenhawk. Lots of new to me recs up there too, thanks to all who posted.

 

bowman81

Super Anarchist
1,372
197
Australia
Author Jared Diamond's Guns Germs And Steel is tremendous but honestly I had to put down his COLLAPSE because it's just so-o depressing... I mean yeah we're all gonna die but a whole book devoted to scientifically proving how stupid we are about it?

- DSK
I've tried a handful of time to read this, I'm interested in the subject matter but found it hard to read. I might have to give it another go.. 

 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
42,326
8,612
Eastern NC
Author Jared Diamond's Guns Germs And Steel is tremendous but honestly I had to put down his COLLAPSE because it's just so-o depressing... I mean yeah we're all gonna die but a whole book devoted to scientifically proving how stupid we are about it?
I've tried a handful of time to read this, I'm interested in the subject matter but found it hard to read. I might have to give it another go.. 
Which one, GS&S or Collapse?

GS&S has a great beginning followed by about 900 pages of tying approx 100 threads together in rather plodding fashion; interspersed with some pretty interesting tidbits of history and science. Unfortunately it's not entirely correct (Diamond is very smart but no one person knows everything that's needed in an attempt like this) and some of it is outdated by now. There really needs to be a new edition.

Collapse is just depressing. Historical cite after historical site about how we're too stupid to avoid fouling our own nests. I couldn't get to the half way mark.

- DSK

 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
I've tried a handful of time to read this, I'm interested in the subject matter but found it hard to read. I might have to give it another go.. 


It's worth having another go!  Diamonds works are very honest, truthful, but can be depressing indeed.  Best to face our fears, than to ignore, or bury them.  Malcolm Gladwell is another brilliant non-fiction Author of past and present day events..

 

Chris in Santa Cruz CA

Super Anarchist
5,804
1,113
earths surface
I've tried a handful of time to read this, I'm interested in the subject matter but found it hard to read. I might have to give it another go.. 
His messages and science are good but the books are very repetitive as far as the central theses are concerned. Lots of skimming to get through them. Collapse has some good news on the "potential" of recovery but mainly around china's top down management of its economy and industry. Lots of words to get there.

1492 and 1493 are much the same but with equally or even better facts about how we got to the number of walking water bags we are now.

 

Bump-n-Grind

Get off my lawn.
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