What's in your arsenal??

veni vidi vici

Omne quod audimus est opinio, non res. Omnia videm
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Yeah and Carlos had a one vs one sniper vs sniper with a NVA that was sent to eliminate him. Carlos caught a reflection of his opponent’s scope and put his round through the NVA scope and into the guy’s head.
There is more to his story and I suggest you find one of the documentaries about his career on the www
 

boomer

Super Anarchist
17,166
2,168
PNW
Yeah and Carlos had a one vs one sniper vs sniper with a NVA that was sent to eliminate him. Carlos caught a reflection of his opponent’s scope and put his round through the NVA scope and into the guy’s head.
There is more to his story and I suggest you find one of the documentaries about his career on the www
Yes I've read all about him, and reviewed his bio last year. He didn't have a pleasant out in the end. BTW he used the standard sniper rifle in use then, a WInchester Model 70 heavy barrel 30-06 with a standard 8x Unertl scope, for his record shot, not the 50 Cal. His backup everyday carry sniper rifle was the M40 Remington 700 chambered in .308 with a Redfield 3-9x - The 50 Cal he used on a few occassions - but his main go to was the Model 70 heavy 30-06, then the M40 Remington 700 .308 which he carried on his second tour, when he was in county[Vietnam].

After returning to active duty, Hathcock helped establish the Marine Corps Scout Sniper School at the Marine base in Quantico, Virginia. Due to the extreme injuries he suffered in Vietnam, he was in nearly constant pain, but continued to dedicate himself to teaching snipers. In 1975, Hathcock's health began to deteriorate, and he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. He stayed in the Marine Corps, but his health continued to decline. Just 55 days short of the 20 years that would have made him eligible for regular retirement pay, he received a permanent disability separation. Being medically discharged, he received 100 percent disability pay. He would have received only 50 percent of his final pay grade had he retired after 20 years. He fell into a state of depression when he was forced out of the Marines because he felt as if the service had kicked him out. During this depression, his wife Jo nearly left him but decided to stay. Hathcock eventually picked up the hobby of shark fishing, which helped him to overcome his depression.

Hathcock once said that he survived in his work because of an ability to "get in the bubble", to put himself into a state of "utter, complete, absolute concentration", first with his equipment, then his environment, in which every breeze and every leaf meant something, and finally on his quarry. After the war, a friend showed Hathcock a passage written by Ernest Hemingway: "Certainly there is no hunting like the hunting of man, and those who have hunted armed men long enough and like it, never really care for anything else thereafter." He copied Hemingway's words on a piece of paper. "He got that right," Hathcock said. "It was the hunt, not the killing." Hathcock said in a book written about his career as a sniper: "I like shooting, and I love hunting. But I never did enjoy killing anybody. It's my job. If I don't get those bastards, then they're gonna kill a lot of these kids dressed up like Marines. That's the way I look at it."

Hathcock's son, Carlos Hathcock III, later enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps; he retired from the Marine Corps as a Gunnery Sergeant after following in his father's footsteps as a shooter and became a member of the Board of Governors of the Marine Corps Distinguished Shooters Association.

Hathcock died on February 22, 1999, in Virginia Beach, Virginia, aged 56, from complications resulting from multiple sclerosis. He is buried at Woodlawn Memorial Gardens in Norfolk, Virginia.

 
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boomer

Super Anarchist
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Since the Broome Ranch behind Point Mugo NavAirSta is no longer the live fire training center for Seabees in Port Hueneme - and is now residential housing. They go through the live fire portion of crew-served weapons training at U.S. Garrison Fort Hunter Liggett. NMCB 5 my old Battalion going through, crew-served weapons training.

Where did you go through your crew-served weapons training?

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boomer

Super Anarchist
17,166
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PNW
"Little Joe" Charfauros had a bounty on his head, he was a forward observer/sniper who only weighs a 110 lbs soaking wet still. BTW his pack weighed about 100 lbs, plus another 50 lbs of ammo. A lifer he made E9 Master Sergent inside of 12 years, he also participated in Grenada and Panama. One of those, who always quietly have your back, worked for me for 20 years after he retired.



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Charlie Foxtrot

Super Anarchist
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Floriduh

boomer

Super Anarchist
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Ooooh, a 10mm PCC. What’s the recoil like? I’m gonna bet it’s a hard hittin’ pussycat.
Not that bad really. A full-sized PCC often feels a little calmer and less rough than an SBR or subgun style weapon. That holds true here. The recoil is slightly less than 5.56, and the brake design adorning the tip of the barrel takes some sting out.
 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
63,955
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Punta Gorda FL
My thumb wants this.
Mine mostly just want to be a lot younger.

The instructions for the battlefield extensions to my new .22 magazines say to remove the little handle thingy that allows you to push down the spring with one hand while inserting rounds with the other. It apparently takes up space that the 11th round needs.

But I LIKE the little thingy!
 

veni vidi vici

Omne quod audimus est opinio, non res. Omnia videm
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A good as place as any
Aerosol shaving cream or
Bristle brush and soap?
I have used the latter for about 40 years except when traveling
 
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