What's in your arsenal??

P_Wop

Super Anarchist
6,370
3,285
Bay Area, CA
I was given a matched pair of Spanish AYA 20-bore sidelock ejectors by a godfather on my 21st.  Lovely guns, lightweight, fast to swing. Pheasant, snipe, pigeon in the Isle of Wight.  I gave them to my godson on his 18th when I came to live in the US 25 years ago.  I miss them because they were beautiful works of art, but would never have used them in the US.

They looked like this:

AYA-Premium-20-bore-630x400.jpg


 
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Charlie Foxtrot

Super Anarchist
4,742
645
Floriduh
polychoke1.jpg


I think you're talking about the Poly Choke. It did change the pattern of the shot for shorter and longer ranges.  It was the thing to do back in the day, and many, if not most, A-5 had them installed.  The downside was the heavy weight on the end of the barrel and the bulge blocking your view of the target.  So, the Poly Choke fad passed and the installation permanently reduced the value of the gun.

 
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billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
I was given a matched pair of Spanish AYA 20-bore sidelock ejectors by a godfather on my 21st.  Lovely guns, lightweight, fast to swing. Pheasant, snipe, pigeon in the Isle of Wight.  I gave them to my godson on his 18th when I came to live in the US 25 years ago.  I miss them because they were beautiful works of art, but would never have used them in the US.

They looked like this:

AYA-Premium-20-bore-630x400.jpg


Beautiful engraving!  Our local friend does work like that, and some much smaller and more detailed.,

 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
I think you're talking about the Poly Choke. It did change the pattern of the shot for shorter and longer.  It was the thing to do back in the day, and many, if not most A-5 had them installed.  The downside was the heavy weight on the end of the barrel and that large bulge blocking your veiw of hte target.  So, the P;oy Choke fad passed and the permanent installation reduced the value of the gun.


I think that is correct,  this gun was used for hunting in the 40's and 50's, and I was told it was a common modification.  Thanks for your better explanation...

 

mad

Super Anarchist
I'm no expert, but I was told that it was a modification to the original barrel that diminished collector value.  It was to allow the hunter to change choke settings for different size shot for different size birds.   Beyond that, I have no clue, as I have never hunted birds, like grandpa did....
Interesting, keep it as something different by the sound of it. 

 

mad

Super Anarchist
I was given a matched pair of Spanish AYA 20-bore sidelock ejectors by a godfather on my 21st.  Lovely guns, lightweight, fast to swing. Pheasant, snipe, pigeon in the Isle of Wight.  I gave them to my godson on his 18th when I came to live in the US 25 years ago.  I miss them because they were beautiful works of art, but would never have used them in the US.

They looked like this:

AYA-Premium-20-bore-630x400.jpg
Really nice!  :)

 

Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
19,098
4,562
Poland
In the Army, I had a 45 pistol, then rode around with  30 cal and 50 cal machine guns, and  a 90mm long gun.

Now I only have a H&K 40 cal pistol, Winchester model 52 with 16X Unertl scope (from my SB silhouette days), and my dad's 22 Mossberg from the 30s.  Can't hit squat with any of them now days.
Jebus, you must be pretty old!

 

Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
19,098
4,562
Poland
Never mind what's in my arsenal Billy, that's a mighty personal question.  I'll only say that I shoot blanks.* 

*I had a vasectomy years ago.  

 

mad

Super Anarchist
polychoke1.jpg


I think you're talking about the Poly Choke. It did change the pattern of the shot for shorter and longer ranges.  It was the thing to do back in the day, and many, if not most, A-5 had them installed.  The downside was the heavy weight on the end of the barrel and the bulge blocking your view of the target.  So, the Poly Choke fad passed and the installation permanently reduced the value of the gun.
Gotta love SA, you can always learn something new here. 
I’d not seen one of those before. 
 

edit,

Just Googled them, I can see why they fell out of favour, especially with internal chokes. 

 
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mad

Super Anarchist
I have an original 1851 Navy revolver.  My father-in-law was a gun collector, and he gave it to me some years ago, with the advice to never fire it.  I never have.  Yet.
Should you ever!! Get it checked and use sympathetic powder and loads. 
Not an expert, but it’s probably worth some money, depending on condition. 
 

Or just too downright scary to think about firing.  :p

 

ROADKILL666

Super Anarchist
2,354
526
FREAKVILLE, FL
Ruger gp 100 4 in barrel,Springfield 1911 range officer, Springfield xds .45,British 303 carbine,m1 carbine  ruger mini 14 stainless, webley from ww2 colt 1911 from ww2 ruger0/Dogballs , mossberg 500 and smith and Wesson  ar 15 I don’t thing I missed anything but most likely did.I am always looking for something new.No I am not a gun nut. 

 

Charlie Foxtrot

Super Anarchist
4,742
645
Floriduh
a24.jpg


I have an original 1851 Navy revolver.  My father-in-law was a gun collector, and he gave it to me some years ago, with the advice to never fire it.  I never have.  Yet.
I'm the Clan's caretaker for a 1849 Colt Pocket Pistol that a GreatX uncle carried during the Civil War while aboard a Union warship. I've been itching to have it repaired and send a few balls downrange to honor the ancestors.  However, the two gunsmiths I've taken it to strongly advised against shooting a relic of that age. The metallurgy wasn't that good back then, and age hasn't improved the early steel.  They recommend getting a modern reproduction to have my fun.  

There are several beautiful Italian reproduction of the 1851 Navy.  https://www.ubertireplicas.com/product/1851-navy/

 

 
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Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
19,098
4,562
Poland
Hopefully before you moved to Poland!  :lol:
Don't worry, it was about 20 years ago, so yes.  

The female doctor that did it was pretty hot but I couldn't offer her a test drive of her work because she allowed my wife at the time to watch the procedure.

 

warbird

Super Anarchist
16,492
1,269
lake michigan
I have an original 1851 Navy revolver.  My father-in-law was a gun collector, and he gave it to me some years ago, with the advice to never fire it.  I never have.  Yet.


Should you ever!! Get it checked and use sympathetic powder and loads. 
Not an expert, but it’s probably worth some money, depending on condition. 
 

Or just too downright scary to think about firing.  :p
I gave my son a 1900 ish  Webley .455 revolver. He checked out the gun then researched loads. He made up brass and gives it a light black powder load. He says it is kind of funny at the range when everyone jas to wait for the smoke to clear when he shoots it. B)

 

mad

Super Anarchist
Don't worry, it was about 20 years ago, so yes.  

The female doctor that did it was pretty hot but I couldn't offer her a test drive of her work because she allowed my wife at the time to watch the procedure.
Only you could be having the snip and still thinking of that!!  :lol:

 
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mad

Super Anarchist
Dammit!!!  I knew this would happen!!

just looking at a new to me (second hand) Browning semi auto, I done really need it, but........................An an almost new, in the box, all synthetic, multi choke that’ll take 3inch goose/magnum cartridges for under £400 is tempting. 
 

See what you’ve started  :p

 
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