What's next in the Cruising queue...;)

olaf hart

Super Anarchist
Looking for a new boat is half the fun ! Then it get's stressful after takeover when you find the hidden issues.

We have had 4 cruising boats, even a heavy ferro 40 footer back in the day.

I Sailed on a Cat some distance around NZ and couldn't get used to he motion or the noise or the lack of windward ability in heavier weather. That wouldn't be an issue for many areas. And you choose your cruising area to suit your boat if your sensible.

Also had a 57 foot VDS mono performance hull that did 9 knots off the wind just under a no 1 jib in the trades but rigged as a sloop it was hard to sail short handed and the gear was all highly stressed. So we chose not to sail it back to Australia from the Atlantic and sold it in the US.

Now we are firmly back to slower plodding medium heavy very robust steel ketch the same size as your schooner and of around 43 tons . The next boat will be a while away, we have no urge to change and for coastal cruising we can take a whole tribe of extended family for days and remain sane.

We looked hard at an aging Mac Gregor 65 and also a Sundeer and weren't that keen on either.

Everything is a compromise, Ideally I'd like a centerboard monohull with 5 foot draft keel up of maybe 56 feet on deck and two equal masts. But life is short and I can't justify building my dream boat.
Adams 13 or Adams 15, there are a few alloy ones out there as well...
 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
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Scuba compressor - we had a Bauer (great brand) Junior and it was at least 100 lbs.

If your compressor is gas it needs lots of fresh air AND it's noisy. I built a locker in the cockpit for it. Then it was just lugging it over a few meters on deck. Previously it was in a deck locker and that was a dead lift that was way more challenging to get it out.
 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
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I think core concept has basically remained the same for a long while but there have been significant evolutions/divergences in thinking on rudders and rigs that have not been tested in real life.
This - exactly. Lots of experiments and never a settled design.
 

Jud - s/v Sputnik

Super Anarchist
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So we have started looking again, as crazy as it is we might decide a 65' wood schooner is not the best fit for a couple to do extended cruising on. Our first boat was a Crealock 36' frp ketch, number two the schooner. We have met lots of people on all kinds of boats. Our big priority is always water related fun. Like to have guests and have adult kid who surfs. Both of us like to dive. The wife keeps coming back to leopard 48's we spent time around a family on one it checks alot of boxes. Alot of the Amels the same. That said you can spend a insane amount of time on yacht world looking at lots of amazing boats. We are at least ten years out from leaving again probably five from purchase. Soo in the vain of window shopping what are you after for the next boat?? Curious for what people are looking at and why. We have definite parameters that have evolved over alot of time. What is driving others in their decision process?
You maintain a 65’ wooden boat, part time?! No wonder you’re looking for a new boat :)

We’d like to do some high latitude cruising. And mid-latitudes. Trade wind RTW.

After that, a nice coastal boat would fit the bill - something to leave in the Sea of Cortez for half the year.

Or - entirely different, sell the house, downsize to something smaller and pour big money into a big boat.

My next boat will be a...dunno yet...I can see a simple coastal cruiser to keep on the Sea of. Cortez to sail half the year? Or a racer-cruiser to race in the occasional Hawaii race? Or maybe we’ll end up in the Med or the Caribbean or who knows where else on a future circumnavigation, and the plans will change.

I like the multi idea too. Met a French couple up the BC coast years ago who had a custom 13m aluminum cat. Pretty sweet. Big enough, but not too big. They said it’s relative weight was good for stability...don’t know if that’s true.
 
That's funny we were just talking about Mexico last night. Escondido has turned out pretty nice under the new owners. The moorings are well maintained and cost effective to leave a boat, growth is way better than points south and it seems to get missed by most of the blows and lightning shows. The International airport a few minutes away is a great and you are right in some of the best cruising in the Sea of Cortez. I could see finding something and putting there for about five years before retirement and actually getting some use out of it while still working. The ideal offset seasons of the Sea give some good windows to visit Oct-Dec and late Feb to July. Obviously the storm cycles are in flux so gotta plan well these days.
 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
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Escondido has turned out pretty nice under the new owners. The moorings are well maintained and cost effective to leave a boat, growth is way better than points south and it seems to get missed by most of the blows
I don't agree about being missed by hurricanes. It's had at least 1 that I recall sweep right over it. Boats ended up ashore all over the place.

Late Feb the water will be COLD.
 

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,681
3,263
Here is a fast cruiser/expedition cat that if it ever comes on the market should get grabbed immediately.

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We were down there for one, I think Fonatur still had it and you could anchor inside. They had one come over the top Dirigo the big schooner went on the beach. No more anchoring inside and the moorings are getting renewed. We dove on one and it hell for strong with a decent arrangement. Agree Mexico is always a crap shoot. Either lightning or a blow. Paradise in PV, Barra and Escondido have a decent track record though. Most people run north to Juanico if they can.
 

harryproa

Anarchist
861
109
That has been said for twenty-three years but still no proof to back up the claims.
I think Mark was referring to the C50 and C60, none of which have been launched yet.

Maybe not enough proof for you, but enough for my clients. Business has been good enough for me to take 3 years off to build a 24m/80' cargo proa which we are currently assembling in Fiji.
And enough for the Prime Ministers of Fiji and Tonga, the UN, several ambassadors and other dignitaries who launched the project in Fiji last week, describing it as "the future of transport in the Pacific".

Materials cost $US20k, it weighs 3 tonnes empty and has the capacity to carry 10 tonnes of cargo. It is a prototype, which may or may not do all that is required (which is why I built a prototype), but is widely acclaimed in the Pacific (and at the recent Oceans conference) as a first step to solving remote village accessibility and reducing shipping emissions.
From the Fiji PM. "Consider yourself fortunate to be part of a groundbreaking project, that not only contributes to saving the eco-system, but brings communities together and maintains our traditional roots. The time for talking is over, it is time we acted"

More about it at http://harryproa.com/?p=2561
and
https://forums.sailinganarchy.com/t...hipping-for remote-island-communities.232116/

There is an opportunity (several actually) for you and other posters who care about climate change to spend your talents and time helping with projects such as these rather than sniping from the sidelines.

Zonker,
Your unsupported mud slinging says more about you than it does about Harryproas.

launched.jpg


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harryproa

Anarchist
861
109
As interesting as it is I don't think a cargo Proa is in the mix for our next cruising boat.
;-)
Nor do I, was just using it to show that the long standing group of Harry haters on this site are out of touch with what is happening with the boats. I waited until the thread seemed dead before I posted it.

If you were in the market for a good performing boat that was easier to sail and lower cost to maintain and build than a comparable 'usable' space cat, you might consider a C50 Harryproa. There are several of these being built around the world (none sailing yet), including a semi production set up in Sweden. These are 'mk 2' versions, with all the improvements and lessons we learnt from the original strip planked boats, plus what we have learnt about Intelligent Infusion from building boats ourselves.

If you wanted a bit more room, the C60.

If you were to run the build yourself (rent space, hire workers, organise the logistics), you would be in the cost ballpark of a similar usable space cat without any of the rebuilding/replacement required on a second hand boat and none of the profit, advertising, contingency, office expenses and warranty costs and issues that go with a new production or yard built boat. This option is not for everybody, but cruisers who want to know what is in their boat it is worth considering.

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Interesting thanks for sharing, unfortunately the "build a boat" part is still in the instant divorce category. I would probably do something really dumb like a Irons 60 fusion schooner... because well that makes sense somehow.

Saw Bright Wings is for sale, we were around that one in MX, not even close to reality but fun to window shop.
 

ProaSailor

dreaming my life away...
6,053
753
Oregon
I would probably do something really dumb like a Irons 60 fusion schooner... because well that makes sense somehow.
You mean Nigel Irens and yes, his boats make a lot of sense. His web site is terrible though.
Designed as a long distance short-handed cruising yacht for an experienced yachtsman, the 17.4m (58ft) schooner Farfarer was built by Covey Island Boatworks, Nova Scotia in wood epoxy to replace the owners’ previous schooner Maggie B.

For ease of use, performance and longevity Nigel Irens chose unstayed rotating masts that remove the need for standing rigging and the associated potential for sail chafe and offer a lower centre of gravity to increase righting moment.

The high aspect sailplan includes ‘fathead’ sails that are particularly effective in the schooner configuration, helping to maximise the effective sail area between the masts. The traditional catboat styling above the water is complemented below the water with moderate 1.9m (6ft) draft and a centreboard easily allowing 220 mile sailing days.
Farfarer-Ext-01.jpg


Nigel Irens Farfarer "fusion" schooner

A new fusion schooner from Covey Island
Ocean Navigator, December 22, 2010




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Yes, that guy, there was a French engineer who built one in the Philippines scaled down to 50'. A friend of ours knows him well. I came across his blog way too late. It would have been a extremely good value to build two boats side by side but no one would take him up on it. If we had connected in the beginning probably would still be cruising and not looking for boat three.
 

ProaSailor

dreaming my life away...
6,053
753
Oregon
Yes, that guy, there was a French engineer who built one in the Philippines scaled down to 50'. A friend of ours knows him well. I came across his blog way too late. It would have been a extremely good value to build two boats side by side but no one would take him up on it. If we had connected in the beginning probably would still be cruising and not looking for boat three.

This guy:

Nigel Irens 50' schooner
50 foot cruising schooner construction in philippines

Scaled down indeed, not the same boat at all. And not the same people doing the work:
For all engineering, It's my friend Simon Jupe involved, he do all structural details and calculations, he his a real professional naval architect ( and seasoned sailor) you can find this very competent and pragmatic naval architect at...

[and instead of Ted Van Dusen] for the carbon masts, it's the hight tech composite specialist Julian Smith who are in charge... you can find him at...
19 june 2010 2.JPG
 
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