Where they garnish Manhattans and Old Fashioneds with an olive

Max Rockatansky

DILLIGAF?
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Jud - s/v Sputnik

Super Anarchist
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1,895
Canada
I like olives, but dropping one into whiskey seems revolting to me.

I think it’s an umami thing. Like the Jameson whiskey followed by a shot of pickle juice thing. I’m willing to try it. Just not today. :)

Invented a new cocktail last night. Got home late after a super fun after work night of removing cabinetry and ripping old head plumbing out of a cold boat in small, dark spaces.

By the time I’d gotten home, it was colder and darker and, as I thought of work the next day, my wake up a alarm mere 6.5 hours away, contemplating my chosen fate for now, paying for boat upgrades, I decided I needed a drink to compensate for the nasty plumbing work —which, naturally, involved catching my hand on a sharp wire in the end of an 1 1/2” wire-wound waste hose. Fair amount of blood. That same hose —which I thought empty— then surprisingly ejected a bunch of cold, stinky water on me and the floor. Ugh! So, a drink was in order late last night as a salve.

Flinging open the liquor cabinet at home, I didn’t see much I wanted. Something strong and easy to drink. Improvising, I poured maybe two shots of vodka in a glass. That’s the vehicle for the flavour to come. What flavour? Spied a bottle of Cointreau, cloyingly sweet orange liqueur of which you use just a small amount in Margaritas, I think (?). One of those bottles, undoubtedly fairly expensive, that’ll typically just sit there sadly in the liquor cabinet undrunk (is that a word?) for months or years, being a specialty liqueur, denying one the ephemeral pleasure that moderate drinking brings. Why let it sit there “rotting” away?

So, two (or more) shots of vodka. One or less of Cointreau. Drink relatively fast, since the over-sweetness of the Cointreau has been rather toned down by the relative abundance of vodka. A sleeping tonic, and not too sweet as well. Hey, it’s what I came up with on the fly late last night with a cut hand and old marine plumbing hose stench on me. Tastes better than it sounds - certainly better than whiskey (or brandy) with olives...
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,546
2,549
I think it’s an umami thing. Like the Jameson whiskey followed by a shot of pickle juice thing. I’m willing to try it. Just not today. :)

Invented a new cocktail last night. Got home late after a super fun after work night of removing cabinetry and ripping old head plumbing out of a cold boat in small, dark spaces.

By the time I’d gotten home, it was colder and darker and, as I thought of work the next day, my wake up a alarm mere 6.5 hours away, contemplating my chosen fate for now, paying for boat upgrades, I decided I needed a drink to compensate for the nasty plumbing work —which, naturally, involved catching my hand on a sharp wire in the end of an 1 1/2” wire-wound waste hose. Fair amount of blood. That same hose —which I thought empty— then surprisingly ejected a bunch of cold, stinky water on me and the floor. Ugh! So, a drink was in order late last night as a salve.

Flinging open the liquor cabinet at home, I didn’t see much I wanted. Something strong and easy to drink. Improvising, I poured maybe two shots of vodka in a glass. That’s the vehicle for the flavour to come. What flavour? Spied a bottle of Cointreau, cloyingly sweet orange liqueur of which you use just a small amount in Margaritas, I think (?). One of those bottles, undoubtedly fairly expensive, that’ll typically just sit there sadly in the liquor cabinet undrunk (is that a word?) for months or years, being a specialty liqueur, denying one the ephemeral pleasure that moderate drinking brings. Why let it sit there “rotting” away?

So, two (or more) shots of vodka. One or less of Cointreau. Drink relatively fast, since the over-sweetness of the Cointreau has been rather toned down by the relative abundance of vodka. A sleeping tonic, and not too sweet as well. Hey, it’s what I came up with on the fly late last night with a cut hand and old marine plumbing hose stench on me. Tastes better than it sounds - certainly better than whiskey (or brandy) with olives...
I'm not interested in putting anything in a drink other than the occasional ice cube.

While the liquor cabinet at home still has those sad, barely used bottles of odd stuff used only occasionally (at most) in mixed drinks, the alcohol on the boat has been reduced to wine, and rum.

Those two things are pretty effective.
 

Jim in Halifax

Super Anarchist
1,798
859
Nova Scotia
I'm not interested in putting anything in a drink other than the occasional ice cube.

While the liquor cabinet at home still has those sad, barely used bottles of odd stuff used only occasionally (at most) in mixed drinks, the alcohol on the boat has been reduced to wine, and rum.

Those two things are pretty effective.
In agreement here. But I always have beer aboard too. Not as 'effective' perhaps but hard to beat as a thirst quencher on a hot, sunny day.
 

2airishuman

The Loyal Opposition
1,004
477
Minneapolis area
Spied a bottle of Cointreau, cloyingly sweet orange liqueur of which you use just a small amount in Margaritas, I think (
Margaritas, sidecars, Mai Tais, and many other tiki drinks. The common theme is that lemon juice (sidecar) or lime juice (pretty much everything else) is added to balance the sweetness. I sometimes keep Combier or another less-sweet orange liqueur around for drinks that require it, and avoid keeping Cointreau on hand.
 

Talchotali

Capt. Marvel's Wise Friend
492
248
Vancouverium BC
Gosh, how'd I miss this thread?!?

Name this cocktail:



3 ounces gin

1 ounce vodka

1/2 ounce Lillet blanc aperitif

Garnish: lemon twist

Steps

Add the gin, vodka and Lillet blanc into a mixing glass with ice and stir until well-chilled.

Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Express the oils from a lemon twist over the drink, rub the twist along the rim of the glass and drop it into the cocktail.
 
Last edited:

sculpin

Super Anarchist
Gosh, how'd I miss this thread?!?

Name this cocktail:



3 ounces gin

1 ounce vodka

1/2 ounce Lillet blanc aperitif

Garnish: lemon twist

Steps

Add the gin, vodka and Lillet blanc into a mixing glass with ice and stir until well-chilled.

Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Express the oils from a lemon twist over the drink, rub the twist along the rim of the glass and drop it into the cocktail.
That's a Vesper.
 

Tacoma Mud Flats

Have star, will steer by
JB has other women in his life. Moneypenny gets her due,

Lemon wedge, Demerara sugar
1 Ounce(s) Gin
1 Ounce(s) Fresh grapefruit juice
1/2 Ounce(s) Lillet Blanc
1/2 Ounce(s) Fresh lemon juice
1 Dash(es) Grapefruit bitters
Grapefruit twist

Rim chilled cocktail glass with lemon and sugar. Shake remaining ingredients with ice and strain into glass. Add grapefruit twist. Serve in a Cocktail Glass.
 


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