Which country has the best health care system?

Happy

Super Anarchist
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Tropical Oz
In Australia, we can't complain. 

I'm self-employed, can't afford private health cover, get senior discounts. My regular meds cost me $ 7.00 a month. GP consultations free. Hospital/ambulance free. Quality of care very good.

And then there's the Covid thing. Today the entire country had 3 (THREE) new cases, all of who's contacts have already been traced and isolated.

Miraculously, with this level of subsidized medical care, our country is neither bankrupt nor communist. 

 
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Sol Rosenberg

Girthy Member
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Earth
In Australia, we can't complain. 

I'm self-employed, can't afford private health cover, get senior discounts. My regular meds cost me $ 7.00 a month. GP consultations free. Hospital/ambulance free. Quality of care very good.

And then there's the Covid thing. Today the entire country had 3 (THREE) new cases, all of who's contacts have already been traced and isolated.

Miraculously, with this level of subsidized medical care, our country is neither bankrupt nor communist. 
There is a huge flaw in that system. There is no mechanism for the rich folks to profit from restricting poor folks’ access to health care. See my pimps and ho’s theory of the US health insurance industry. 

 

Grrr...

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9,708
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Detroit
In Australia, we can't complain. 

I'm self-employed, can't afford private health cover, get senior discounts. My regular meds cost me $ 7.00 a month. GP consultations free. Hospital/ambulance free. Quality of care very good.

And then there's the Covid thing. Today the entire country had 3 (THREE) new cases, all of who's contacts have already been traced and isolated.

Miraculously, with this level of subsidized medical care, our country is neither bankrupt nor communist. 
So - people get touchy when you're not specific, and it invalidates your statements.  Those consultations aren't free.  Those hospital / ambulances aren't free.  You pay for them in SOME way.

But - much like roads and other funding.  Once you get used to paying for them through your taxes, it becomes a non-issue.  It's the initial shock when those taxes go up that everyone screams about.

 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
61,137
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De Nile
So - people get touchy when you're not specific, and it invalidates your statements.  Those consultations aren't free.  Those hospital / ambulances aren't free.  You pay for them in SOME way.

But - much like roads and other funding.  Once you get used to paying for them through your taxes, it becomes a non-issue.  It's the initial shock when those taxes go up that everyone screams about.
Want to try that one again? they spend 1/2 of the US spend / person. In the us , for a family of 4, if you don’t pay$40k/year on HC, you’re a taker. Socialist commie bastard. Wonder why US manufacturing is non-competitive?
 


Health consumption expenditures per capita, U.S. dollars, PPP adjusted, 2019




 


United States



$10,966






Switzerland



$7,732






Germany



$6,646






Austria



$5,851






Sweden



$5,782






Netherlands



$5,765






Comparable Country Average



$5,697






Belgium



$5,428






Canada



$5,418






France



$5,376






Australia



$5,187






Japan



$4,823






United Kingdom



$4,653









 
 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
61,137
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De Nile
quod umbra said:
The US does have the best healthcare in the world...... but we pay for it, and pay for it heavily.
Not quite. Across the population our HC outcomes aren’t even world class. Unless you’re a wealthy suburbanite. Then it’s great.

 

Grrr...

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Detroit
Not quite. Across the population our HC outcomes aren’t even world class. Unless you’re a wealthy suburbanite. Then it’s great.
PLEASE stop trying to speak truth to Quod.  He is firmly seated in the right-wing Rah! Rah! US! seat.

I pay a combined $18k / year between myself and my company.  My son had get an MRI when he hurt his back.  That was another $1400.  Then my wife needed a sleep study.  They did an EEG with it.  That was $1200.  But that was AFTER they had us do a 'home sleep study' with a little gizmo, that came back inclusive.  That was $900.  And those 'home' sleep studies come back inclusive  more then half the time.  I pay $150 a visit for a TELECALL, where they stare at me through a cell phone and tell me I'm not gonna die.  This all happened in the last two months.  I have a heart condition.  Want to talk about the price I paid for my stent?

But yeah.  We're great here in the US.  Who CAN'T dump $25k a year into health care, and $100k+ in a bad year?  And if you can't, you should pull your sorry ass up by your boot straps and work harder.  After all, that job you got was never MEANT to be a living wage.

 
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Raz'r

Super Anarchist
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De Nile
Not really. Look at some outcomes for difficult cancers. If you have an unlimited pile of cash, the USA is not a bad place to be sick. If you aren't in the 1%............not so much.
Yeah, they point to the shiny objects and say "That's healthcare!" - Look at that MRI! Look at that fancy building!

When in reality, real health care, that leads to real outcomes (and is relatively inexpensive) are things like pre-natal care for the poor. Nutrition assistance, regular wellness checkups to catch that cancer early, dietary training, etc

And yes, we have 1% of our population just managing healthcare payment mechanisms. What a waste of talent.

To date, few studies have estimated the systemwide cost of health care administration extending beyond BIR activities. In a 2003 article in The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers Steffie Woolhandler, Terry Campbell, and David Himmelstein concluded that overall administrative costs in 1999 amounted to 31 percent of total health care expenditures or $294 billion5—roughly $569 billion today when adjusted for medical care inflation.6 A more recent paper by Woolhandler and Himmelstein, which looked at 2017 spending levels, placed the total cost of administration at $1.1 trillion.7

Woolhandler and Himmelstein estimate that the United States currently spends $1.1 trillion on health care administration, and of that amount, $504 billion is excess.26 Woolhandler and Himmelstein rely on surveys of physicians’ time use and utilized physician income data to translate the share of time physicians spend on administrative tasks into monetary value; their estimate of excess costs is the difference between U.S. and Canadian administrative spending27 Woolhandler and Himmelstein’s original 2003 article estimated that Canada spent $307 per capita on health system administration, compared with $1,059 per capita in the United States. Assuming this difference is excess requires an assumption that a Canadian-style health care system would achieve an identical level of administrative costs in the United States.

https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/healthcare/reports/2019/04/08/468302/excess-administrative-costs-burden-u-s-health-care-system/

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
67,248
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Great Wet North
Not quite. Across the population our HC outcomes aren’t even world class. Unless you’re a wealthy suburbanite. Then it’s great.
America is the only developed nation where life expectancy is declining.

You pay double what we pay to get worse outcomes and 4 years less life expectancy.

The national IQ in the States is also declining.

Coincidence?

 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
61,137
5,011
De Nile
America is the only developed nation where life expectancy is declining.

You pay double what we pay to get worse outcomes and 4 years less life expectancy.

The national IQ in the States is also declining.

Coincidence?
The Romans could at least look to lead poisoning, the Mongols to the death of a strong leader with little in succession planning, etc. What will be the pax-americana decline attributed to? The triumph of mass-media propaganda by the wealthy class to take income inequality to such an extreme that it literally caused a decline in IQ and life expectancy?

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,312
5,236
Canada
I lived in the US for 4 years. Easy to compare my doctors.

US: 5 family doctors sharing a practice, about 6+(?) people in the front office doing insurance stuff (never counted)

Canada: 7 or 8 doctors in same office (not all there every day but I think US office was similar). 3 people in the front office. 1 of those is a nurse practioner.

US: busted my collarbone, waited for 3 weeks to see orthapedic doctor because there were few "in my network". By this time bones had started healing together but not very well. Was not pleased when doctor suggested grinding down the bone lump in my shoulder. With something like a die grinder. (in his defense I would be asleep)

Canada: got ass cancer. All my appointments/treatments/consulation in same building. Out of pocket costs were $20 for some coloscopy prep before we knew I had it. And about $15 for oral chemo drugs I think. Maybe $30?  

For most Canadians medical costs are just not something they think about unless they have rare condition that the government won't fund the drugs.
We don't have people die of diabetes 'cause they can't afford insulin.

 

Left Shift

Super Anarchist
10,532
3,267
Seattle
The Romans could at least look to lead poisoning, the Mongols to the death of a strong leader with little in succession planning, etc. What will be the pax-americana decline attributed to? The triumph of mass-media propaganda by the wealthy class to take income inequality to such an extreme that it literally caused a decline in IQ and life expectancy?
The propaganda leading to our decline is not being spread by mass media, it is being spread by micro-media and money-grubbing trolls selling snake oil and spreading dis-information and by targeted broadcasts like Fox and OAN. 

It is Republicans, who's lust for money and power is based on creating an ineffective government and social service safety net.  

Those all may be the same people.  

 

spankoka

Super Anarchist
I am completely satisfied with the health care I get in BC, when I lived in NB.....not so much. At one time I planned to go back east when I retired, but nowadays I have to consider the fact that I may not have a family doctor for several years after I return.  The "if you are sick go to a walk in clinic or ER" model of health care is okay for healthy young people. Older people need consistency. I think the Canadian health care system may be in for a historical reckoning given that Tommy Douglas had now very unfashionable views towards indigenous people, and was a proponent of eugenics. 

 
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