WLYDO Challenge!

Greever

Super Anarchist
4,091
106
Rockford, MI
OK: So I saw the excitement in Bobs boat thread regarding the possibility of making his boat a kit. I understand why it wouldn't work as drawn. So here is the challenge:

Draw a good looking, great sailing, trailer-sailer. (that can be built by someone with reasonable skills)

Not a Sportboat, must be able to be singlehanded.

Must have a lifting keel for easy launching/retreiving.

CNC Ringframes with strip-planking seem to be the favored method of building. (think Hungs kayak)

Chines look cool....

Optional "Turbo" rig for areas like SanDiego.

Any way to do one without a compression post in the interior? (although with a keel-trunk I suppose that doesn't really matter?) :unsure:

I think the homebuilt boat is the ONLY solution for the Sailor on a budget that wants a new, modern boat. I have had a blast building my Spindrift (almost done!), and I thought I wanted to build an i550, but the crew requirements have me second guessing myself. (not very many Sailors here in Hell, eerr, uuhhh, I mean Phoenix ;) )

Come on Maestro, I KNOW you could design something you would be willing to put your name on!

I have to go to work, but will check in later!

 

Soñadora

Super Anarchist
AWESOME idea.

You could look at several methods for making this boat.

1.) FRP

Sounds intimidating, but a 21 footer might be within the reach of someone at the high end of home-builder. I'm willing to bet that most of us have dealt with epoxy, resin, glass, etc.

2.) Lapstrake

Both this method and FRP will allow for a more fair hull shape. This is old school. Personally, I'd love to build a plank-on-frame boat. I imagine myself retired (not really sure what that means as I've never really felt like I've ever had a real job), spending my days in a warm garage building a boat like this.

3.) Panels

This would be the easiest, I think. It will require chine(s). It would be possible to do this with only one chine. The more chines you put in, the 'smoother' you may be able to make the hull look. I like the panel idea as it allows for quick design and build - as long as the penels are 'developable'. That means you will not have any rocker or tumblehome. The panels will only be able to curve in one direction. While plywood/epoxy would be the absolute cheapest/easiest, this would be the right size for an aluminum boat. If it was me, I'd insulate the hull to get away from the tin-can sound that aluminum boats have.

 

WunHungLo

Super Anarchist
5,896
4
PNW
Greever, posting your question in a new topic is now going to have people posting thoughts in two places now, on basically the same boat. Except for the fixed keel meeting your "trailerable" criteria, there is nothing about this design that needs to be played with for a kit or home-build in any method you like.

my $0.02

 

romaine

Super Anarchist
1,252
1
Keels, why does a sailboat have to have a keel? It's so unfair and frustrating, especially on smaller boats.

There have been several allusions and references to Philip Bolger and his idiosyncratic designs whilst discussing the Perry21. His propensity for asymmetry might be the direction to go. What I am thinking is an off-centerboard built into the face of one of the settees. This would preserve precious foot space in the cabin and, if Mr. Bolger is to be believed, would have no or negligible effect on the performance of the boat (compared to a centerboard, not a 5'5" draft ballasted keel).

Actually I don't think that is such a good idea. I want a true keel with a bunch of Pb at the nether end. If I wanted to be able to trailer the boat conveniently (and I do.) a shoal keel is the answer. I really don't want a centerboard of any type. Performance would suffer, particularly uphill, but this is a cruising boat after all, and as we all know, gentlemen don't sail to weather.

Concerning materials: I'm starting to lean in the direction of FRP for the boat I am going to build this winter. I've built several plywood/epoxy/frp boats and while the thought of building a fiberglass-only hull is rather daunting it probably isn't all that difficult to do -certainly no more difficult that cold-molding and probably not much more difficult than strip building.

romaine

PS: Solo, what is that trimaran? Got a link?

 
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sailak

Super Anarchist
2,872
47
AK
...and as we all know, gentlemen don't sail to weather.
If Bob wants a boat to sail around the Puget Sound area (i.e. cruise) it is going to need to go to weather. Same for me up here in Alaska. The "gentlemen don't sail to weather" thing only applies to trade wind cruisers, not us higher latitude types. We always are sailing to weather. For me, unfortunately, it seems to usually be in the form of a 6 knot apparent wind which interestingly enough is always dead ahead.

 

mpr

New member
16
0
Greever, posting your question in a new topic is now going to have people posting thoughts in two places now, on basically the same boat. Except for the fixed keel meeting your "trailerable" criteria, there is nothing about this design that needs to be played with for a kit or home-build in any method you like.
my $0.02

How about a compromise; a partially lifting keel? You could get 2' of lift and keep it below the aft end of the bunk, just at and forward of the compression post. Then you go from 5' draft to 3' trailerable but keep the hunk of lead for good sailing performance.

 

aurichor

Anarchist
903
0
SF Bay
Solo said:
alas, it has no keel
lewtrem11.jpg


and if you really want the chines, build in plywood instead of strip planking

mkiv19.jpg


designer: Dick Newick

what does he win?

s.
Eye beach PLEASE! :blink:

other than looks it might be practical.

 

SemiSalt

Super Anarchist
7,790
287
WLIS
Concerning materials: I'm starting to lean in the direction of FRP for the boat I am going to build this winter. I've built several plywood/epoxy/frp boats and while the thought of building a fiberglass-only hull is rather daunting it probably isn't all that difficult to do -certainly no more difficult that cold-molding and probably not much more difficult than strip building.
Once upon a time, there was a bit of a movement toward building a plug in foam (e.g. airex) and glassing inside and out. There was even an explanation of how to do it in the Defender catalog. I guess other ideas worked out better since it faded away. Unless a mold is really, really fair, a 'glass boat is going to be heavy.

We've been through a period of time where custom boats were built using strip planking as a mold which eventually became the core of a sandwich with some combination of wood and 'glass veneers inner and outer. I suspect that's what you've done before. Some people use ply as the core.

So I'm curious how you would do it. The best site I know about for DYI highish technology boats is here: http://www.tboat.com/index.html. Some of the multihull designers have their own methods, too.

 

PHM

Super Anarchist
1,053
54
However.....I was thinking exactly the same thing last night....an easily trailerable version of Bob's 21. I was daydreaming about going "cruising" (if I ever retire or semi-retire) by trailering a small but capable and fun to sail boat around to the best cruising venues in the US and Baja.... the PNW during a summer, some time in the Sea of Cortez during the spring, Great Lakes and lakes of the NE during the summer, etc. It would be a fun way to spend a couple of years with long pitstops back home in SD. Just a thought at this point but a compelling one.

 
127
0
Although they are different flavor, some might want to look at Graham Byrnes' designs for plywood/epoxy trailerables from 16 to 26 feet. The Spindrift is one of his smaller dinghy designs. The trailerables aren't intended to have the deep water righting moment of the Perry21, but they run the range from ballasted centerboard cruisers to unballasted centerboard performance boats. They are attractive to those of us with thinner waters and wallets. He's like Bob, he doesn't like to sail slow boats, which is cool. He has sailed a couple of his designs to convincing wins in the "raid" style Everglades Challenge. From his site:

Southern%20Skimmer%20spinnaker.jpg


 

O25 dude

Anarchist
656
0
Hampton, Va
...and as we all know, gentlemen don't sail to weather.
If Bob wants a boat to sail around the Puget Sound area (i.e. cruise) it is going to need to go to weather. Same for me up here in Alaska. The "gentlemen don't sail to weather" thing only applies to trade wind cruisers, not us higher latitude types. We always are sailing to weather. For me, unfortunately, it seems to usually be in the form of a 6 knot apparent wind which interestingly enough is always dead ahead.
You've lost me...are you saying a boat with a lifting keel can't sail to weather?

 




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