Worrell 1000 - 2022 Official Results & post-race analysis

F18 Sailor

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F18 was designed around an overweight boat due to the skill set of Hobie builders...
I can believe that as being true for a production builder...at the time there were other french builders that could achieve lower weights. I think the target of being robust enough for raid sailing while still being built in glass was also a factor. Carbon was also still more exotic in the early 90's than it is today. Unfortunately the class hasn't done a great job lowering the build weight over time, say 5lbs every 2 years or something to get us a 350lb F18, and the reality is making that change now would be a very hard sell to the existing boat owners.

 

Sailabout

Super Anarchist
I can believe that as being true for a production builder...at the time there were other french builders that could achieve lower weights. I think the target of being robust enough for raid sailing while still being built in glass was also a factor. Carbon was also still more exotic in the early 90's than it is today. Unfortunately the class hasn't done a great job lowering the build weight over time, say 5lbs every 2 years or something to get us a 350lb F18, and the reality is making that change now would be a very hard sell to the existing boat owners.
Hobie invented the class, rules ensure its built low tech and if Hobie started it, overweight and low tech is their thing,  it was going to be overweight and it was.

 

david r

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For the record, Hobie Alter was a surfer.  Hobie cats were invented to sail out thru surf so that they could ride a wave back in.  Later on Hobie saw that racing was fun.  He created a world wide class association with worlds and us nationals run with factory supplied boats.  I used to talk to him at the races and he was very happy that you could show up for a nationals or worlds with your sailing gear and compete.  Later on Hobie stopped racing and the company was sold to Coleman, racing hobies with supplied boats continued for a while and slowly wound down to what it is now.  So, Hobie and Phil Edwards made the H18 for sailing in the surf like the 14 and 16.  The F18 formula is from Europe I think.  Boats built for sailing in the surf need to be more robust and tend to weigh more.
The sailing of the cats at the beach became a very popular sport for a while.  Ppl were spending weekends at the beach just sailing and surfing for fun.  When they started the Worrell race, it came from that sort of culture.  The goal was to sail from Florida to Virginia.  If you put your boat on the trailer and drove it, you were out of the race.
If they turn the distance sail into a regatta with throw outs and the ability to trailer your boat and still win, the name should be changed.  Maybe Worrell 1000 tribute race, or 1000 mile regatta.

 

F18 Sailor

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This is the official story of how the F18 came to be: https://www.f18-international.org/about/how-formula-18-did-come-on-earth/

I have little doubt that Hobiecat France was involved early on, with the launch of the Hobie Tiger in 1995, but there were other boats before the Tiger (i.e Alado F18), and at least according to Olivier, the intent was to generate a competitive boat under the SCHRS handicap formula. This doesn't necessarily translate to the fastest boat, or the best built boat, or the lightest boat etc.

 
Thanks for all the responses to this thread, especially all the history of the event that several here know first hand. I sent a quick note to the organizers alerting them to the existence of this thread, and I'm still hoping one of them might drop by and comment on some of what's been written here.

Congrats again to Team Australia, and all the competitors for a fantastic event.
 

MultiThom

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I think that this particular race should require a mainsail that can be reefed, but you might ask the competitors who failed to complete the leg whether or not they would have reduced sail had they had that choice.
 

david r

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Thanks for posting the Hobie Alter interview. There was a lot of information there. That was news to me about him sailing the 1000. HA was a humble art/craft genius.

Considering how main sails lock at the top, reefing is not much of an option. Even reef-able boats like H16 rarely stop and reef. The exotic 2nd rig like the aussie 18 skiffs have?

The Tornado is a good boat option because of the kick up/pull down centerboard system. Daggerboard stuck in place is kind of dangerous, also they are not designed kick up if you hit something.


Question: would the idea of building a down wind monster that maybe didn't go upwind great, still be something to pursue? Those windsurfer bottom hulls shapes could maybe be played with a bit more.
 

MultiThom

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"Considering how main sails lock at the top, reefing is not much of an option. Even reef-able boats like H16 rarely stop and reef. "

Anything can be done if you want to do it. Adding a sheave and halyard, or changing the hoist to 2:1 are two simple ways to keep compression loads low while enabling a reef. But would these highly competitive teams avail themselves of the ability? Dunno. But if they wouldn't, it makes the severe penalty for dnf a leg more reasonable.
 
Anything can be done if you want to do it. Adding a sheave and halyard, or changing the hoist to 2:1 are two simple ways to keep compression loads low while enabling a reef

Agreed.

For R2AK 2017 on our Inter 20 cat, we based off someone's suggestion and added a snapshackle + ~6ft dyneema leash attached between the mainsail head and the mainsail ring shackle, allowing us to drop the mainsail head while keeping the ring still hooked at masthead (i.e. keeping compression unchanged). When we wanted to reef from main full-up, we would just pull the snapshackle open (via a thin dyneema trigger line running down outside the mast), then the mainsail foot would come down to its reef point, which our sailmaker added for a small $ amount. This was optimized for those "Oh s***, I need to reef right now" moments. Fairly simple, and we definitely used it -- see mid-way this video: .

Nothing like a reef to settle a multi down.

In hindsight, I think a 2:1 would have been a better idea. Trading off higher compression loads, but more flexibility & less complexity. With the snapshackle + leash approach, we had a big problem (twice), when with full-main up the leash would flog around and end-up looping over & around the mast top (!), preventing us from reefing or even dropping the mainsail entirely (unless we tipped the boat over). Also, the long external dyneema trigger line added extra messiness to the spaghetti on the tramp.

Either way, reefing is doable. TBD if it would have helped in Worrell conditions. Some F18 sailors told us that if you properly tune your rig & depower the main (via rotation + downhaul), then you really don't need a reef. Personally, I think that may hold in flat water, but I'm doubtful in waves...
 

MultiThom

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"the snapshackle + leash approach, we had a big problem (twice), when with full-main up the leash would flog around and end-up looping over & around the mast top (!), preventing us from reefing or even dropping the mainsail entirely (unless we tipped the boat over). Also, the long external dyneema trigger line added extra messiness to the spaghetti on the tramp."

Had you had more time to play with it prior to racing with it, I'm sure a couple velcro patches along the luff would have solved those issues. Also would be a good idea to add a slug at the masthead ring to keep the boltrope from pulling out when reefed. I did these changes on a hobie getaway that I liked to sail single handed and knew I was unable to right single handed.
 
Had you had more time to play with it prior to racing with it, I'm sure a couple velcro patches along the luff would have solved those issues. Also would be a good idea to add a slug at the masthead ring to keep the boltrope from pulling out when reefed.
Yes, there are likely multiple ways to tame the leash (velcro on the sail, bundling the leash in a velcro strap or a rubber band...). None are perfect, but could probably get to something reasonably reliable.

We did add a Hobie cat slug to the mainsail head, precisely to prevent boltrope from pulling out, as you mentioned. Pulling out the boltrope would be one of the worst nightmares I can imagine (making it very hard to drop the main, even capsized).
 
Can you put a rope constrictor clutch at the top of the mast? This: https://www.sailingworld.com/gear/ronstan-constrictor-clutch/

(I'm sure it takes some sorting out to the point it's reliable)
Interesting idea (kind of like a flexible hook). As with everything, can probably be made to work, but I don't think I'd try it personally -- too complex to release the rope constrictor remotely, especially from the load direction.

What I would consider instead: bond another hook to the mast at the desired reefpoint. Not sure how to get the hook geometry right, but if done right the system would be as simple as can be.

Either way, plenty of options to build-in a reef if desired.
 

Max Rockatansky

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See if you can find the Marstrom halyard lock, which if I remember right, is similar to this:

Halyard had beads swaged at a couple points, wire spliced to line. Pull to release, pull to engage. Was a rotating mast with internal halyard, in my case on my ex-F-27GS.
 

david r

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interesting part, where does that halyard lock mount? cable halyard is unusual of small cats these days i think. It is not very easy to reef a H16 on the water. That is why there is an old picture of Mike Worrell leaving the beach with reefed main and no jib. He had to land on the beach to reef. That means an extra beach landing/ launching which could very well lead to other problems with these giant dagger board boats.
I remember the original supercat 20 had a cable main halyard with a hook inside the mast track near the bottom of the mast. That system can be made reefable. There was one factory boat the Bill had that could be reefed. The mast head fitting was extra strong to handle downhaul pressure. Many of the masthead fittings can not stand downhaul pressure.
 

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