x-yachts x-119

sailor bum

New member
Anybody out there know anything about the X-119 built by X-Yachts in Denmark?  I'm thinking of buying one.

I've heard that they have a welded steel frame bonded into the hull to handle keel loads.  I'm worried that on a 30 year old boat there will be corrosion problems.

Any info would be welcome

 

d'ranger

Super Anarchist
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I don't have time right now but try doing a search in this forum for the x-119 as I remember it being discussed including the grid you asked about. I sailed and raced on one years ago and liked it, remember it being tweaky and well constructed.

 

stealth

New member
40
2
Singapore
Anybody out there know anything about the X-119 built by X-Yachts in Denmark?  I'm thinking of buying one.

I've heard that they have a welded steel frame bonded into the hull to handle keel loads.  I'm worried that on a 30 year old boat there will be corrosion problems.

Any info would be welcome
You can find the brochure for the X-119 here: https://3brefc126v633i9r4zk9q3p5-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/X-119-brochure.pdf

There is a X-yacht owners club with a large technical library where I am sure you can get a lot answers: https://x-yachtsowners.co.uk/

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
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Every boat I've ever heard of with a steel grid has eventually had to have it replaced. Some like old Cals just had a beam or a small structure but those X-boats have a big and elaborate one that would be a huge job to replace.

I wouldn't go near one.

 

Pehrst

Member
441
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Stockholm
Cristoforo said:
But of course this is from an ignorant data source with the quality of knowledge you would expect to get on an anonymous  free of charge website, so the opinion is worth as much, and the buyer shouldn't be concerned following  even a most perfunctory survey. 
I agree, I have not heard of a single X-Yacht who had their integral keel grid replaced (sure there must be some) , they had used this since 1980 (650 built since). mine was built in 1985 and showed no sign of coming apart from the hull, not even rust, they were if I recall correctly hot galvanized and simply glassed into the hull. A 3/4 tonner had a bumpy ride from Fl to Chicago had the forward end cracked from the hull however this was simply remedied. Earlier in the thread, someone mentioned the windows, beware they will all leak and needs to be rebedded, not an easy task to make it last. Butyl tape came to my rescue.

 

crashdog

Anarchist
538
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The keels themselves were a bigger problem with the 119s, because they were composite, cast iron fin and lead bulb which creates several problems.  But the internal grid is sound as far as I know.  Do a thorough moisture test during the survey.  The tin rig is getting on in life by now, and although they were tree trunks, have a long look there, also.

 

Pehrst

Member
441
3
Stockholm
Cristoforo said:
But of course this is from an ignorant data source with the quality of knowledge you would expect to get on an anonymous  free of charge website, so the opinion is worth as much, and the buyer shouldn't be concerned following  even a most perfunctory survey. 
Crashdog,

Out of curiosity, what on earth would cause lead and cast iron keels create any problems, this has been used for 30 years by many builders?

Pehr

 

slug zitski

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X- yachts uses Jeffa aluminum  rudder stocks and aluminum self aligning bearings 

pull the rudder and inspect at survey 

a new rudder  and bearing is a good way to tear up ten grand 

8E5E7174-9164-484F-83BF-0911593F443C.jpeg

5D26087A-9978-44DD-9D9B-A1BBD9C4DF77.jpeg

 

sailor bum

New member
Slug,  Thanks for the tip on the rudder post and bearings.  I'll be sure to have the surveyor pull the rudder and check.  She has a tiller, not a wheel so this should be relatively easy.

 

gkny

Member
335
25
I redid the rudder bearing on an x boat with an aluminum post.  Jeffa has bearings for many of the x boats.  Be very careful with wiring in and around the binnacle. The post on my boat had no signs of corrosion or wear

 

slug zitski

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I redid the rudder bearing on an x boat with an aluminum post.  Jeffa has bearings for many of the x boats.  Be very careful with wiring in and around the binnacle. The post on my boat had no signs of corrosion or wear
Typically the damage is caused by copper oxide antifoul 

do not use copper oxide antifoul on boats with underwater or wet aluminum

 
Crashdog,

Out of curiosity, what on earth would cause lead and cast iron keels create any problems, this has been used for 30 years by many builders?

Pehr
Cast iron fin and a lead bulb?  Would that create corrosion due to mixed metals?  Pehr, do you have any corrosion on the steel fin?  Does it require regular maintenance to keep the corrosion on the fin low (like I need to do on my Jeanneau!?!)

 
Anybody out there know anything about the X-119 built by X-Yachts in Denmark?  I'm thinking of buying one.

I've heard that they have a welded steel frame bonded into the hull to handle keel loads.  I'm worried that on a 30 year old boat there will be corrosion problems.

Any info would be welcome
wondering which one you are looking at. I sold mine in 2000 and it went to TX... if that's the one, it's a very unique 119. The boats are incredibly well built. How it has held up would have more to do with the current owner and how they've maintained it. Feel free to PM me if you want more info. 

 

Reference

Member
294
119
X- yachts uses Jeffa aluminum  rudder stocks and aluminum self aligning bearings 

pull the rudder and inspect at survey 

a new rudder  and bearing is a good way to tear up ten grand
I’d be surprised to find a seller willing to let you pull the rudder at survey. It’s not a small job on a bigger boat, depending  on how difficult it is to access the quadrant &  autopilot ram. And it has to hang in the slings the whole time, tying up the yard’s lift. 

If it were mine, I’d only agree to that after an otherwise satisfactory survey, and the buyer would need to pay the whole cost with a contractor/yard of my choosing.

 

slug zitski

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I’d be surprised to find a seller willing to let you pull the rudder at survey. It’s not a small job on a bigger boat, depending  on how difficult it is to access the quadrant &  autopilot ram. And it has to hang in the slings the whole time, tying up the yard’s lift. 

If it were mine, I’d only agree to that after an otherwise satisfactory survey, and the buyer would need to pay the whole cost with a contractor/yard of my choosing.
The shipyard pulls the rudder 

the surveyor inspects it 

the buyer pays 

if the owner fails to agree,  immediately deduct 10 grand  or whatever it costs for a new rudder and lower bearing   from the asking price 

 
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Reference

Member
294
119
The shipyard pulls the rudder 

the surveyor inspects it 

if the owner fails to agree,  immediately deduct 10 grand  or whatever it costs for a new rudder and lower bearing   from the asking price 
Sellers market right now....  good luck with that approach.  Unless there’s good cause to suspect a problem, I’m not not paying 2k and taking the boat off the market for 3 weeks waiting for the yard to do the work,  just for the novice buyer to change his mind anyway. 

A more realistic approach is to escrow 8k on the price and let the buyer buyer handle the rudder inspection, within a reasonable timeframe, say 2 weeks. It will be a good lesson for him in how much even simple boat projects cost... 
 

But when potential buyers start making expensive demands, that’s usually a sign they’re going to be unreasonable about something and the deal will fall through anyway.

 
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slug zitski

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Sellers market right now....  good luck with that approach.  Unless there’s good cause to suspect a problem, I’m not not paying 2k and taking the boat off the market for 3 weeks waiting for the yard to do the work,  just for the novice buyer to change his mind anyway. 

A more realistic approach is to escrow 8k on the price and let the buyer buyer handle the rudder inspection, within a reasonable timeframe, say 2 weeks. It will be a good lesson for him in how much even simple boat projects cost... 
 

But when potential buyers start making expensive demands, that’s usually a sign they’re going to be unreasonable about something and the deal will fall through anyway.
It’s possible the boat has a maintenance log proving that the rudder has been removed  for inspection every second year 

 

Schnick

Super Anarchist
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Vancouver, BC
If you got a 119 and put a half decent keel on it I think it would be very very fast.  As it is the hull shape is good, rig is heavy but fine, construction quite good.  That keel though has all the drawbacks of both fin and bulb keels with few of the benefits of either.

If you put the design into a vpp such as ORC it says they are quicker than most phrf fleets would have you believe.

 
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