your worst distance race experience! What happened?

moody frog

Super Anarchist
4,294
114
Brittany
But it's enlightening and humbling to read all these experiences. I've been sailing all my life, haven't done much offshore racing but all kinds of other sailing... rescued people and been rescued, some pretty bad storms, etc etc. Like most SouthEastern USAneans I have been thru hurricanes but never at sea (thank God).

My worst experience at sea was on a Navy destroyer off the coast of Scotland. Trying to work in a boiler room that's on it's ear 3/4 of the time is difficult but not in any way comparable. My worst experience in a distance race was a spinnaker broach at night in Chi-Mac and I was below... trying to get out of my bunk and to the companionway, somebody stomped hard on my right hand and it put me out of action until the fun was over anyway, so I just got back into the pipe berth and went to sleep. My near-death sailing experiences have all been in small boats, thunderstorms and asshole motorboats and such.

So yeah, I can see the point where this wouold not be the best thread to show a newbie you're hoping to recruit. But I love it just the same, thank you all!

FB- Doug
:rolleyes:

Although I would rank a Biscay crossing in a mine sweeper which moved in the gale, hour after hour, as an IOR boat before a death roll as one of my more frightening experiences ........

 

fan

Super Anarchist
1,873
104
San Diego
I guess this one is a lesson is shit doesn't only go South in breeze poor prep can lead to trouble even in light air.  Did a Cabo on boat no water maker took bottled water only against my advice.  Ended up very slow and reached go /no go and had to drop out while in first as we would not have enough water to get to the end.  Two years later asked to do Cabo agin on the same boat. Promises of water maker being installed for the race.  Race arrives no wate maker don't worry we put the bladder back in have more then enough water.  I ummed and erred but had a great crew and figured it's a Cabo waht could go wrong.  Wake up first morning to all the water from the bladder in the bilge as owner had cross threaded the fitting so instant water rationing. Forecast looked slow but not too bad we continued on.  This lead to dehydration and some constipation.  Got a cut on my finger went to med kit everything wet and had ben for a while no antibiotic ointment or anything else.  Fix it up as best I can. Started feeling worse and worse until I was confined to my bunk the last 20 hours.  Ended up going off the boat on a stertcher directly to hospital.  Dehydration, impacted bowel, a bit of shock, at the time they thought swollen or burst apendix, possible blood poisoning and MERSA.  Was in hospital for two days before I could fly home and go to doctor.  Suffice to say I am now always involved in Med Kit and won't go offshore without a water maker.

 

RImike

Super Anarchist
1,031
124
Newport RI
I wasn't even part of it and I still live with it to this day and that was the 2011 Annapolis to Newport Race when then Donnybrook ran around. My wife got messed up bad, spent the rest of June in the hospital and summer recovering from a rather lengthy internal surgery done to resolve damage done from the impact. 

 

kinardly

Super Anarchist
:rolleyes:

Although I would rank a Biscay crossing in a mine sweeper which moved in the gale, hour after hour, as an IOR boat before a death roll as one of my more frightening experiences ........
Steam, don't get me wrong. This is the most fascinating and engaging discussion in a looong time. Reading of these exploits makes me all too aware of my limitations. I doubt I wold have performed to this level and most likely would have chucked the whole sailing thing afterwards.

 

P_Wop

Super Anarchist
6,919
3,978
Bay Area, CA
:rolleyes:

Although I would rank a Biscay crossing in a mine sweeper which moved in the gale, hour after hour, as an IOR boat before a death roll as one of my more frightening experiences ........
Too right.  As was well recorded, those little ships would roll on wet grass.  HRH Prince of Wales, once in command of HMS Bronington, pennant number M-1115 (also known as "old quarter past eleven") was once asked what was the best cure for sea-sickness.  "Go and sit under a tree."

 
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moody frog

Super Anarchist
4,294
114
Brittany
Too right.  As was well recorded, those little ships would roll on wet grass.  HRH Prince of Wales, once in command of HMS Bronington, pennant number M-1115 (also known as "old quarter past eleven") was once asked what was the best cure for sea-sickness.  "Go and sit under a tree."
;) At the time, I had been only too happy to see a brass plate with " design by Philip L. Rhodes".  How's that about misplaced trust :)

 

NZK

Anarchist
910
659
Roaming
Here's another one, albeit an isolated incident in an otherwise very fun race...

During a Caribbean 600 I woke up in mid air after getting launched across the inside of a Gunboat when we got hit by a very strong gust rolling off the back of one of the islands. I'd been asleep on the port side of the main salon/cabin. Ended up slamming into the side of the galley island on the stbd side and landing on top of another crew member who I think had also been asleep on the floor. 

We stayed upright and carried on unharmed but that split second of waking up in mid air was a proper 'pucker the balloon knot' moment...

 

plenamar

Member
368
54
Buenos Aires
Whimp perspective here.

I have sailed for many (50?) years. Mostly inshore/coastal + some offshore. Reasonably resistant to seasickness.

Maybe it's age, but I am impressed how tiring a sustained 25-30 knot wind can be offshore. Is our anemometer registering correctly?
 

Imagine anything above 35/40 will be decidedly unpleasant. Have been in several of these but short duration squalls. 

 

usa293

New member
Sorry I skimmed a bit but has someone brought up 2013 Down the bay?  Did it on the family 36.7, lost count of the wipe outs, pulled the rivers out of the vang kicker and fixed it by stuffing the biggest Allen wrench we had on board into one of the holes when they lined up and duct taping it in place.... I think a TP 52 stayed just ahead of the really nautical stuff and posted a pic of a bar tab in Hampton before dark... hobie 33 had to be hauled on arrival due to hull delam from hours above hull speed, couple boats lost their rig...

 

RATM

Anarchist
852
45
While this story has nothing to do with the actual sailing, it's a story about assholes that seem to exist on our planet. We had just finished a Cleveland Deepwater to Put-In-Bay. We're pulling into the public docks trying to find a place to raft. The inner boats are all huge power boats and none of them are letting the sail boats raft up. Nothing but a huge shouting match. It's about 2AM so we're thinking about heading out and dropping an anchor. We see an open mooring ball labeled "Police Use Only". Since we knew we were going to crash on the boat. We tied up. 

 

tizak

Member
Transpac - similar to incident mentioned above. A little over half way when spin pole mast ring breaks sending outboard end of pole crashing into the owner's forehead while the inboard end punches a hole in the main. Had two doctors onboard but one had become afraid and spent all days after the West End of Catalina below along with the owner's son (CG vet with time on a cutter in Viet Nam) who was likewise, afraid. Incident resulted in a crew of five that began as eight. Fortunately it all ended well for the owner and the shirkers just kinda faded away once we hit Waikiki.

 

Livia

Super Anarchist
4,013
1,082
Southern Ocean
What did Alex Whitworth used to say when teaching Safety and survival at Sea courses: "You spend enough time at sea you see everything!"

Sinking, fire, dismasting, capsize, rudder failure, serious injury, MOB.

Sounds about right.

 

shaggybaxter

Super Anarchist
4,510
2,551
Australia
What did Alex Whitworth used to say when teaching Safety and survival at Sea courses: "You spend enough time at sea you see everything!"

Sinking, fire, dismasting, capsize, rudder failure, serious injury, MOB.

Sounds about right.
Livia,

The boys want a commemorative shirt for our delivery a few years ago.

We all reckon yours needed a few more words.....

polo Shirt.png

 




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